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Pato Banton (born Patrick Murray; 5 October 1961) is a reggae singer and toaster from Birmingham, England. He received the nickname "Pato Banton" from his stepfather; The first name derives from a Jamaican night owl that stays up all night calling "patoo, patoo" and the last name from the disc jockey slang word "Banton" which means heavyweight lyricist or storyteller.[1][2]

Pato Banton
Birth namePatrick Murray
Born (1961-10-05) 5 October 1961 (age 57)
Birmingham, England
OriginBirmingham, England
GenresReggae
Occupation(s)Musician
InstrumentsVocals
Years active1980s–present
LabelsFashion, Ariwa, IRS
Associated actsThe Beat
Websitewww.patobanton.com

Contents

BiographyEdit

Born in Birmingham, Banton first came to public attention in the early 1980s when he worked with The Beat.[3] He recorded "Pato and Roger a Go Talk" with Ranking Roger, included on the 1982 album Special Beat Service.[4] He went on to record a series of singles for Fashion Records and Don Christie Records.[4] He was one of the guest artists that appeared on the UB40 album Baggariddim in 1985. Banton's debut album was the 1985, Mad Professor-produced Mad Professor Captures Pato Banton, followed in 1987 by Never Give In, which included a collaboration with Paul Shaffer and a follow-up to his earlier collaboration with Ranking Roger with "Pato and Roger Come Again".[5] After an EP in 1988, Banton released a more pop-oriented LP, Visions of the World, followed by 1990's Wize Up! (No Compromise), which included a college radio hit in Spirits in the Material World (The Police cover) and another collaboration, "Wize Up!", this time with David Hinds of Steel Pulse.[4]

Banton then worked on a live album and with Mad Professor, and then released 1992's Universal Love. The album featured a song covered by Banton called "United We Stand", which was written by fellow Birmingham musician Ray Watts, of the group Beshara. After a 1994 British number one hit with "Baby Come Back" (originally by Eddy Grant performing with The Equals) with Robin and Ali Campbell of UB40,[4] a best-of album was released, and Banton was invited by Sting to join him on his "This Cowboy Song" single.[5] 1996's Stay Positive was followed by Life Is a Miracle in 2000. Life Is a Miracle received a Grammy nomination for Best Reggae Album in the 2001 Grammy Awards.[6]

DiscographyEdit

  • Mad Professor Captures Pato Banton (1985)
  • Never Give In (1987)
  • Visions of the World (1989)
  • Mad Professor Recaptures Pato Banton (1990)
  • Wize Up! (No Compromize) (1990)
  • Live & Kickin All Over America (1991)
  • Universal Love (1992)
  • Collections (1994)
  • Stay Positive (1996)
  • Time Come (1999)
  • Tudo De Bom - Live in Brazil (2000)
  • Life Is a Miracle (2000)
  • Live at the Maritime - San Francisco (2001)
  • The Best of Pato Banton (2002)
  • Positive Vibrations (2007)
  • Pato Banton and Friends (2008)
  • Destination Paradise (2008)

FilmographyEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ [1][dead link]
  2. ^ "About". Patobanton.com. 3 February 2014. Retrieved 14 January 2019.
  3. ^ Barrow, Steve & Dalton, Peter (2004) The Rough Guide to Reggae, 3rd edn., Rough Guides, ISBN 1-84353-329-4, p.403
  4. ^ a b c d Larkin, Colin (1998) The Virgin Encyclopedia of Reggae, Virgin Books, ISBN 0-7535-0242-9, p.19-20
  5. ^ a b Moskowitz, David V. (2006), Caribbean Popular Music: an Encyclopedia of Reggae, Mento, Ska, Rock Steady, and Dancehall, Greenwood Press, ISBN 0-313-33158-8, pp. 21-22.
  6. ^ "CNN - Breaking News, Latest News and Videos". CNN. Retrieved 14 January 2019.

External linksEdit