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OVH is a French cloud computing company that offers VPS, dedicated servers and other web services. OVH owns the world's largest datacentre in surface area.[3] They are the largest hosting provider in Europe,[4][5] and the third largest in the world based on physical servers.[6] The company was founded in 1999[7] by the Klaba family and is headquartered in Roubaix, France. OVH is incorporated as a simplified joint-stock company under French law.

OVH
Private
IndustryCloud computing, Hosting
Founded1999; 20 years ago (1999)
Headquarters,
Key people
  • Octave Klaba
    (Founder, Chairman, CEO)[1]
  • Henryk Klaba
    (President)
  • Miroslaw Klaba
    (R&D director)
ProductsVPS, Hosting, Web hosting, DSL
RevenueIncrease 320 million (2016)[2]
Websitewww.ovh.com

History and growthEdit

OVH was founded in 1999[7] by Octave Klaba, with the help of three family members (Henry, Haline, and Miroslaw). In October 2016, it was reported that OVH raised $250 million in order to raise further international expansion.[8] This funding round valued OVH at over US$1 billion. In the fiscal year of 2016, OVH reportedly had €320 million in revenue. In 2018 OVH announced its five-year plans to triple investment starting in 2021. Which represent between US$4.6 to $8.1 billion (4 to 7 billion euros).[9]

Facts and figuresEdit

As of 2018, OVH has 27 datacenters in 19 countries hosting 300,000 servers.[10] The company offers localized services such as customer service offices in many European countries, as well as in North America, Africa, and Singapore.[11]

OVH is one of the sponsors for Let's Encrypt.[12][13]

OVH hardware supplier is Super Micro Computer Inc.[14]

WikiLeaksEdit

In December 2010, French Gizmodo edition revealed that WikiLeaks selected OVH as its new hosting provider, following Amazon's refusal to host it.[15][16][17] On December 3, the growing controversy prompted Eric Besson, France's Industry Minister, to inquire about legal ways to prohibit this hosting in France. The attempt failed. On December 6, 2010, a judge ruled that there was no need for OVH to cease hosting WikiLeaks.[18] The case was rejected on the grounds that such a case required an adversarial hearing.[19]

Information disclosure and multiple vulnerabilitiesEdit

In January 2019, the magazine WebsitePlanet uncovered client-side vulnerability in some of the largest hosting companies in the world: Bluehost, DreamHost, HostGator, iPage and OVH.[20]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "OVH reorganises its governance to support new acceleration phase". OVH.
  2. ^ "OVH Mag, Actualités, innovetions & tendances IT" (in French). No. June 2014. OVH. p. 2. Cite magazine requires |magazine= (help)
  3. ^ Wood, Eric Emin (2016-10-12). "Why OVH opened the world's largest datacentre in the Great White North". www.itworldcanada.com. International Data Group, Inc. (IDG) IT World Canada. Archived from the original on 2019-10-16. Retrieved 2019-10-16.
  4. ^ MSV, Janakiram (2019-05-26). "How VMware Is Transforming Itself Into a Multi-Cloud Company". Forbes. Archived from the original on 2019-10-16. Retrieved 2019-10-16.
  5. ^ Coop, Alex (2019-08-27). "Canadian customers' heads are still in the clouds, and so is VMware's | Financial Post". Financial Post. Archived from the original on 2019-10-16. Retrieved 2019-10-16.
  6. ^ Sarraf, Samira (2017-05-12). "World's third-largest hosting provider OVH opens Melbourne office". CRN Australia. nextmedia. Archived from the original on 2019-10-16. Retrieved 2019-10-16.
  7. ^ a b Clabaugh, Jeff (2016-10-06). "French firm to open 1st US data center in Fauquier Co". WTOP. Archived from the original on 2019-10-16. Retrieved 2019-10-16.
  8. ^ "OVH Partners with KKR and TowerBrook for Further Global Expansion". exithub. Retrieved 9 January 2017.
  9. ^ Rosemain, Mathieu; Barzic, Gwénaëlle (2018-10-18). "France's OVH to triple spending to take on Google, Amazon in cloud..." Reuters. Archived from the original on 2019-09-06. Retrieved 2019-09-07.
  10. ^ "About - OVH Canada". OVH. Archived from the original on 2018-07-09. Retrieved 2018-07-09.
  11. ^ Williams, Mike; Turner, Brian (2019-08-26). "Best dedicated server hosting providers of 2019". TechRadar. Archived from the original on 2019-09-06. Retrieved 2019-09-06.
  12. ^ Lomas, Natasha (2016-04-12). "Let's Encrypt free HTTPS certification push exits beta". TechCrunch. Archived from the original on 2019-10-16. Retrieved 2019-10-16.
  13. ^ Gilbert, Guillaume (December 22, 2015). "OVH Commits to Let's Encrypt to Provide Free SSL Certificates". OVH.COM. Retrieved 21 January 2016.
  14. ^ Mawad, Marie (2018-10-18). "OVH Keeps Super Micro as Supplier, Vets Hardware In-House". www.bloomberg.com. Bloomberg. Archived from the original on 2019-09-06. Retrieved 2019-09-06.
  15. ^ Greenberg, Andy (September 13, 2012). This Machine Kills Secrets: How WikiLeakers, Hacktivists, and Cypherpunks Are Freeing the World's Information. New York (New York), USA: Random House. ISBN 978-0-753-54801-1. Archived from the original on 2019-09-06. Retrieved 2015-07-23. Within days, they had registered the URL and set up an SSLprotected site and a Tor Hidden Service in an OVH data center in the French city of Roubaix, the same one that briefly housed WikiLeaks' publications until they migrated to Sweden.
  16. ^ Vinocur, Nick; Love, Brian (2010-12-03). "France seeks to bar hosting WikiLeaks website". Reuters. Archived from the original on 2019-09-07. Retrieved 2019-09-08.
  17. ^ Greenberg, Andy (2010-12-03). "Despite Attacks, WikiLeaks' Swedish Host Won't Budge". Forbes. Archived from the original on 2016-03-05.
  18. ^ "French web host need not shut down WikiLeaks site: judge". Agence France-Presse (AFP). 2010-12-06. Archived from the original on 2013-01-03. Retrieved 2019-09-07.
  19. ^ "Following the wikileaks case". OVH. 6 December 2010. Archived from the original on 15 March 2012. Retrieved 15 October 2013.
  20. ^ "Report: We Tested 5 Popular Web Hosting Companies & All Were Easily Hacked". Website Planet. 15 January 2019. Retrieved 20 May 2019.

External linksEdit

See alsoEdit