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Notre Dame–Stanford football rivalry

The Notre Dame–Stanford football rivalry is an American college football rivalry[citation needed] between the Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team of the University of Notre Dame and Stanford Cardinal football team of Stanford University. As of 2018, the Notre Dame Fighting Irish and Stanford Cardinal have met 33 times, beginning in 1925 (though the modern series began in 1988).[1] The Notre Dame–Stanford game has been played annually since 1997, with the teams meeting at Notre Dame Stadium earlier in the season (late September to mid-October) in even-numbered years, and at Stanford Stadium on the weekend following Thanksgiving in odd-numbered years since 1999. The game typically alternates positions in Notre Dame's schedule with its other Pac-12 opponent, USC.

Notre Dame–Stanford football rivalry
First meetingJanuary 1, 1925
Notre Dame 27, Stanford 10
Latest meetingSeptember 29, 2018
Notre Dame 38, Stanford 17
Next meetingNovember 30, 2019 in Palo Alto
StadiumsNotre Dame Stadium
South Bend, Indiana, U.S.
Stanford Stadium
Stanford, California, U.S.
TrophyNone (1925–1988)
Legends Trophy (1989–present)
Statistics
Meetings total33
All-time seriesNotre Dame leads, 19–13 (.594)
Trophy seriesNotre Dame leads, 15–12 (.556)
Largest victoryNotre Dame, 57–7 (2003)
Longest win streakNotre Dame, 7 (2002–2008)
Current win streakNotre Dame, 1 (2018–present)

TrophyEdit

 
The Legends Trophy is awarded to the winner of the annual Notre Dame–Stanford football game, and currently resides with Notre Dame. The trophy was reconditioned in 2014 to allow for display of another 20+ future game score plates, and to honor the 90th anniversary of the first meeting of the two teams in the 1925 Rose Bowl.
 
Close up of new game score plate for Notre Dame vs. Stanford 1925 Rose Bowl

The winner of the game gains the Legends Trophy, a Dublin Irish crystal bowl resting on a California redwood base.[1][2][3][4] The trophy was presented for the first time in 1989 by the Notre Dame Club of the San Francisco Bay Area.[1][5][6]

Series historyEdit

The series began on January 1, 1925 (the end of the 1924 season) when Notre Dame's Four Horsemen and head coach Knute Rockne faced Stanford's Ernie Nevers and head coach Pop Warner at the 1925 Rose Bowl.[7][8][9] Notre Dame's 27–10 victory earned their first-ever national title and the first of four national titles to come via bowl victories.[1]

After the two teams' first meeting at the 1925 Rose Bowl, they did not play each other again until 1942.[7] They did not meet again until playing two games in 1963 and 1964. Those four games were the only games before the modern series began. Notre Dame and Stanford have played the modern series annually since 1988 (except in 1995 and 1996).[1] The series has been renewed through the 2024 season.

Game resultsEdit

As of 2018, Notre Dame leads the series 19–13, though the Cardinal lead 7–3 in the last ten games.[1] The Fighting Irish hold the longest win-streak in the series, with seven wins from 2002 to 2008.[1][7] The Cardinal's longest win streak were a pair of 3-win streaks from 2009 to 2011 and from 2015 to 2017. The back-to-back wins in 2009 and 2010 were the school's first consecutive victories in the series.[1] Notre Dame is 12–4 at home while Stanford is 9–6 at home.[1][7] Notre Dame won the only game played at a neutral site at the 1925 Rose Bowl.[7]

Notre Dame victoriesStanford victoriesVacated wins[n 1]
No.DateLocationWinnerScoreNotes
1 January 1, 1925 Pasadena, CA Notre Dame 27–10
2 October 10, 1942 South Bend, IN Notre Dame 27–0 [nb 1]
3 October 26, 1963 Stanford, CA Stanford 24–14
4 October 24, 1964 South Bend, IN #2 Notre Dame 28–6
5 October 1, 1988 South Bend, IN #5 Notre Dame 42–14 [nb 2]
6 October 7, 1989 Stanford, CA #1 Notre Dame 27–17 [nb 3]
7 October 6, 1990 South Bend, IN Stanford 36–31 [nb 4]
8 October 5, 1991 Stanford, CA #8 Notre Dame 42–26
9 October 3, 1992 South Bend, IN #18 Stanford 33–16 [nb 5]
10 October 2, 1993 Stanford, CA #4 Notre Dame 48–20
11 October 1, 1994 South Bend, IN #8 Notre Dame 34–15 [nb 6]
12 October 4, 1997 Stanford, CA #19 Stanford 33–15
13 October 3, 1998 South Bend, IN #23 Notre Dame 35–17
14 November 27, 1999 Stanford, CA Stanford 40–37
15 October 7, 2000 South Bend, IN #25 Notre Dame 20–14
16 November 24, 2001 Stanford, CA #13 Stanford 17–13
17 October 5, 2002 South Bend, IN #9 Notre Dame 31–7 [nb 7]
18 November 29, 2003 Stanford, CA Notre Dame 57–7 [nb 8]
No.DateLocationWinnerScoreNotes
19 October 9, 2004 South Bend, IN Notre Dame 23–15
20 November 26, 2005 Stanford, CA Notre Dame 38–31
21 October 7, 2006 South Bend, IN #12 Notre Dame 31–10
22 November 24, 2007 Stanford, CA Notre Dame 21–14
23 October 4, 2008 South Bend, IN Notre Dame 28–21
24 November 28, 2009 Stanford, CA Stanford 45–38 [nb 9]
25 September 25, 2010 South Bend, IN #16 Stanford 37–14 [nb 10]
26 November 26, 2011 Stanford, CA #4 Stanford 28–14 [nb 11]
27 October 13, 2012 South Bend, IN #7 Notre Dame 20–13OT [nb 12]
28 November 30, 2013 Stanford, CA #8 Stanford 27–20 [nb 13]
29 October 4, 2014 South Bend, IN #9 Notre Dame 17–14 [nb 14]
30 November 28, 2015 Stanford, CA #13 Stanford 38–36 [nb 15]
31 October 15, 2016 South Bend, IN Stanford 17–10
32 November 25, 2017 Stanford, CA #20 Stanford 38–20 [nb 16]
33 September 29, 2018 South Bend, IN #8 Notre Dame 38–17 [nb 17]
34 November 30, 2019 Stanford, CA
Series: Notre Dame leads 19–13
† Vacated by Notre Dame.
Rankings from AP Poll. Source:[10][19]

Game notesEdit

  1. ^ The only shutout of the series[7]
  2. ^ The first meeting of the modern series
  3. ^ The start of a five-game streak in which the away team won[1]
  4. ^ Stanford's first win in the modern series
  5. ^ First time both teams were ranked entering the game[10]
  6. ^ The start of a seven-game streak in which the home team won[1]
  7. ^ The start of a seven-game winning streak for Notre Dame – the longest streak in series history[1][7]
  8. ^ The first victory for an away team since 1993[1]
    The largest margin of victory in any game of the series[7]
  9. ^ Notre Dame fires coach Charlie Weis two days later[11]
  10. ^ Stanford's first win streak in the series[1]
    The largest margin of victory for Stanford in the series
  11. ^ Second time both teams were ranked entering the game
  12. ^ Second straight time (and third time ever) both teams were ranked entering the game. Notre Dame forced overtime on a field goal with 20 seconds left after their drive was extended by Tyler Eifert drawing a pass-interference call on Terrence Brown. In OT, Irish quarterback Tommy Rees, replacing an injured Everett Golson, connected with T. J. Jones for a touchdown. Stanford had a chance to tie to force a second overtime, but after four straight runs by Stanford RB Stepfan Taylor, his final effort was ruled short of the goal line. The last play was reviewed and upheld, though the ruling met with controversy after the game.[12][13][14][15]
  13. ^ Third straight time (and fourth time ever) both teams were ranked entering the game
  14. ^ Fourth straight time (and fifth time ever) both teams were ranked entering the game. Third straight game decided by one score or less.
  15. ^ Fifth straight time (and sixth time ever) both teams were ranked entering the game.
  16. ^ Seventh time both teams were ranked entering the game.
  17. ^ Eighth time both teams were ranked entering the game, but first time both were ranked in the top 10 entering the game.

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Notre Dame's win in 2012 was vacated as a result of NCAA sanctions against the Notre Dame football program issued on November 22, 2016 after the NCAA found that a student-trainer committed academic misconduct for two football players and provided six other players with impermissible academic extra benefits. The NCAA also rejected Notre Dame's appeal on February 13, 2018. This win is not included in Notre Dame's all-time record, nor is it counted in the series record between the two teams.[16] See Wikipedia:WikiProject College football/Vacated victories for an explanation of how vacated victories are recorded.[17][18]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Stanford Game Notes". University of Notre Dame Official Athletics Site.
  2. ^ A picture of the Legends Trophy is available here.
  3. ^ "Notre Dame at Stanford". Sports Illustrated/CNN. 2001-11-24. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  4. ^ "College Football "Eithers": Rivalries Re-Loaded". Rogue Mentality. 2009-11-27.
  5. ^ Rick Eymer (2006-10-06). "Stanford hoping to survive a tough football trip to Notre Dame". Palo Alto Weekly.
  6. ^ Associated Press (2007-11-24). "Cardinal, Irish look for positive finishes". San Mateo Daily Journal.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h "Notre Dame-Stanford series – College Football". Yahoo! Rivals.
  8. ^ Erin McGinn (2010-09-25). "Long history between Notre Dame and Stanford". WNDU-TV.
  9. ^ "The Palo Alto Connection". One Foot Down. 2010-08-15.
  10. ^ a b "Stanford Football Media Guide". Stanford University Athletics.
  11. ^ "Notre Dame confirms it has not retained Charlie Weis". USA Today. November 30, 2009.
  12. ^ "Goal line call secures Notre Dame's win over Stanford (VIDEO)". USA Today. October 14, 2012.
  13. ^ "Notre Dame's controversial goal-line stand secures overtime victory vs. Stanford". AOL. October 13, 2012. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  14. ^ "Pereira: Irish lucky on two big calls". Fox Sports. October 14, 2012. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  15. ^ "Stanford-Notre Dame ends on controversial replay ruling (Video)". Larry Brown Sports. October 13, 2012. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  16. ^ NCAA orders Notre Dame Fighting Irish to vacate wins from 2012, 2013 seasons. ESPN, 2016-11-22.
  17. ^ Low, Chris (June 16, 2009). "What does vacating wins really mean?". ESPN.com. ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved July 9, 2011.
  18. ^ Taylor, John (July 4, 2009). "Vacated Wins Do Not Equal Forfeits". NBCSports.com. NBC Sports. Retrieved July 9, 2011.
  19. ^ "Stanford-Notre Dame Series Extended Through 2019". Stanford University Athletics. May 19, 2011. Archived from the original on November 19, 2012. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)