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Northwood is a neighborhood in the northeastern section of Baltimore, Maryland in the United States. Northwood is served by the New Northwood and the Original Northwood community associations. The area is also home to the Northwood Shopping Center and the Northwood Baseball League. Morgan State University is located in this area.

Northwood Historic District
Northwood Historic District (Baltimore) 1.jpg
Homes in Original Northwood
Northwood, Baltimore is located in Baltimore
Northwood, Baltimore
Northwood, Baltimore is located in Maryland
Northwood, Baltimore
Northwood, Baltimore is located in the United States
Northwood, Baltimore
LocationBounded on the East by Loch Raven Boulevard, U.S. Veterans Administration Rehabilitation & Extended Care Center on the South, The Alameda on the North & Cold Spring Lane on the North, Baltimore, Maryland
Coordinates39°20′26″N 76°35′48″W / 39.34056°N 76.59667°W / 39.34056; -76.59667Coordinates: 39°20′26″N 76°35′48″W / 39.34056°N 76.59667°W / 39.34056; -76.59667
Area125 acres (51 ha)
Built1930 (1930)
ArchitectAhlers, John A.,; et al.
Architectural styleLate 19th And 20th Century Revivals
NRHP reference #98000596[1]
Added to NRHPJune 15, 1998

New NorthwoodEdit

As the name implies, New Northwood is composed of newer homes, built in the mid 1950s. The houses are generally brick row house with trees and shrubs lining most blocks. New Northwood is served by the New Northwood Covenant Association.

DemographicsEdit

According to the 2000 US Census, 7,000 people live in New Northwood with 96.2% African-American and 2.4% White. The median household income is $31,105 and 94.1% of the houses are occupied.[2]

Original NorthwoodEdit

Original Northwood is composed of single family and townhouses ranging in price from $175,000 to $500,000. Development began in September 1930 with themes such as half-timbering and stucco, irregular massing, and the New England house form with jetty. Development began when The Roland Park Company purchased the estates of John W. Garrett, Enoch Pratt and Arunah Shepherdson Abell. By January 1, 1932, about 25 families had bought homes in Original Northwood. Today, Original Northwood comprises 369 homes and is one of the top 15 city neighborhoods in wealth. Original Northwood was designated an Historic District in 1998 and represents the largest unified collection of the architect, John A. Ahlers. Ahlers planning for the inclusion of the natural terrain in his design, with a canopy of oaks and elms, made Original Northwood among the first totally planned communities in the nation.[3]

Northwood Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1998.[1]

DemographicsEdit

According to the 2000 US Census, 1,240 people live in Original Northwood with 56.5% African-American and 37.9% White. The median household income is $64,688 and 93.5% of the houses are occupied.[4]

Notable residentsEdit

Legislative districtsEdit

Community State
District
Congressional
District
City Council
District
Original Northwood
43rd
7th
3rd
New Northwood 43rd 7th
3rd

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. ^ "Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: New Northwood" (PDF). Baltimore City Planning Department. Retrieved October 27, 2007.
  3. ^ Dean R. Wagner (July 1997). "National Register of Historic Places Registration: Northwood Historic District" (PDF). Maryland Historical Trust. Retrieved March 1, 2016.
  4. ^ "Profile of General Demographic Characterics: Original Northwood" (PDF). Baltimore City Planning Department. Retrieved October 27, 2007.

External linksEdit