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Northampton South (UK Parliament constituency)

HistoryEdit

This constituency was created for the election of February 1974 when the old constituency of Northampton was split into Northampton South and Northampton North.

Since creation it is generally a marginal and in elections since 1979 but one, in 2005, has been a bellwether, electing an MP from the winning (or largest governing) party.

The one-time Deputy Speaker of the House, Michael Morris, a Conservative, held this seat from its creation in 1974 until 1997, when Tony Clarke defeated Morris in a surprise result (one of many in the Labour landslide of that year) to gain the seat for Labour with a majority of just 744. Clarke only just increased his majority in 2001, but Brian Binley defeated Clarke to regain the seat for the Conservatives in 2005 with a comfortable majority, and held it until 2015 when he retired and fellow Conservative David Mackintosh held the seat. Mackintosh retired at the 2017 snap election after just one Parliament, after facing the prospect of being deselected by his local constituency party, and Andrew Lewer took over with a decreased majority from 2015 of over 1,000.

BoundariesEdit

1974-1983: The County Borough of Northampton wards of Castle, Delapre, Duston, St Crispin, South, and Weston.

1983-1997: The Borough of Northampton wards of Billing, Castle, Delapre, Nene Valley, New Duston, Old Duston, St Crispin, South, and Weston, and the District of South Northamptonshire wards of Blisworth, Brafield, Bugbrooke, Cogenhoe, Gayton, Hackleton, Harpole, Heyford, Kislingbury, Milton, Roade, Salcey, and Yardley.

1997-2010: The Borough of Northampton wards of Billing, Castle, Delapre, Nene Valley, New Duston, Old Duston, St Crispin, South, and Weston, and the District of South Northamptonshire wards of Brafield, Cogenhoe, Hackleton, Harpole, Kislingbury, Milton, Roade, Salcey, and Yardley.

2010–present: The Borough of Northampton wards of Billing, Castle, Delapre, Ecton Brook, New Duston, Old Duston, St Crispin, St James, Spencer, and Weston.

South Northamptonshire is the 2010-created constituency in the county which absorbed the southern part of the 1997 version of this constituency. Following the 2010 redistribution, the constituency is once again entirely within the Borough of Northampton as opposed to 1983 to 2010 when it also took in outlying rural parts outside the town.

Constituency profileEdit

The constituency has income, social housing and unemployment statistics[3] close to the national average and a varied and dynamic service and engineering-centred economy typical of the East Midlands with significant foodstuffs, clothing and consumables manufacturing and processing operations.[4] Health inequality is high, with the life expectancy gap between the least deprived and most deprived men in northampton reaching over 10.2 years. [5] Additionally, the constituency is 'considerably worse than [the] England average' in violent crime, self harm, under 18 conception and GCSE achievement. [6]

Members of ParliamentEdit

ElectionsEdit

Elections in the 2010sEdit

Next general election: Northampton South
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Renew Rafael Cicci (provisional)[8]
Green Scott Mabbutt[9]

The Renew Party has selected a prospective parliamentary candidate, Rafael Cicci, but have expressed interest in a "Remain Alliance" with other pro-EU parties, and may ultimately choose not to stand their candidate.[10]

General election 2017: Northampton South[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Andrew Lewer 19,231 46.9 +5.3
Labour Kevin McKeever 18,072 44.0 +12.2
UKIP Rose Gibbins 1,630 4.0 −14.3
Liberal Democrat Jill Hope 1,405 3.4 −0.9
Green Scott Mabbutt 696 1.7 −1.9
Majority 1,159 2.9 −6.9
Turnout 41,034 66.5 +3.3
Conservative hold Swing -3.5
General election 2015: Northampton South[12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative David Mackintosh 16,163 41.6 +0.7
Labour Kevin McKeever 12,370 31.8 +6.4
UKIP Rose Gibbins 7,114 18.3 +13.4
Liberal Democrat Sadik Chaudhury 1,673 4.3 -15.1
Green Julie Hawkins 1,403 3.6 +2.7
Majority 3,793 9.8
Turnout 38,884 63.4 +5.2
Conservative hold Swing -2.85
General election 2010: Northampton South [13][14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Brian Binley 15,917 40.8 +3.0
Labour Clyde Loakes 9,913 25.4 -16.1
Liberal Democrat Paul Varnsverry 7,579 19.4 +5.9
Independent Tony Clarke 2,242 5.8 N/A
UKIP Derek Clark 1,897 4.9 +2.8
English Democrat Kevin Sills 618 1.6 N/A
Green Julie Hawkins 363 0.9 N/A
Northampton Save our Public Services Dave Green 325 0.8 N/A
Independent Kevin Wilshire 65 0.2 N/A
Scrap Members' Allowances Liam Costello 59 0.2 N/A
Majority 6,004 15.4
Turnout 38,978 58.2 -0.6
Conservative hold Swing +6.6

Elections in the 2000sEdit

General election 2005: Northampton South[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Brian Binley 23,818 43.7 +2.6
Labour Tony Clarke 19,399 35.6 −7.3
Liberal Democrat Kevin Barron 8,327 15.3 +2.8
UKIP Derek Clark 1,032 1.9 −0.5
Veritas Tony Green 508 0.9 N/A
S O S! Voters Against Overdevelopment of Northampton John Harrison 437 0.8 N/A
Monster Raving Loony John Percival 354 0.6 N/A
Independent Fitzy Fitzpatrick 346 0.6 N/A
Christian Peoples Tim Webb 260 0.5 N/A
Majority 4,419 8.1
Turnout 54,481 60.7 +1.1
Conservative gain from Labour Swing +5.0
General election 2001: Northampton South[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Tony Clarke 21,882 42.9 +0.5
Conservative Shailesh Vara 20,997 41.1 0.0
Liberal Democrat Andrew Simpson 6,355 12.5 +1.4
UKIP Derek Clark 1,237 2.4 +0.4
Liberated Party Tina Harvey 362 0.7 N/A
ProLife Alliance Clare Johnson 196 0.4 N/A
Majority 885 1.8
Turnout 51,029 59.6 -12.1
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1990sEdit

General election 1997: Northampton South[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Tony Clarke 24,214 42.4 +14.1
Conservative Michael Morris 23,470 41.1 -14.6
Liberal Democrat Anthony W Morgan 6,316 11.1 -3.1
Referendum Christopher C Petrie 1,405 2.5
UKIP Derek Clark 1,159 2.0
Natural Law Graham D Woollcombe 541 0.9
Majority 744 1.3 +12.2
Turnout 55,946 71.7 -8.2
Labour gain from Conservative Swing +14.1
General election 1992: Northampton South[18][19]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Michael Morris 36,882 55.3 −0.4
Labour John Dickie 19,909 29.8 +5.3
Liberal Democrat Graham A G Mabbutt 9,912 14.9 −3.7
Majority 16,973 25.4 −5.7
Turnout 66,703 79.9 +4.7
Conservative hold Swing −2.8

Elections in the 1980sEdit

General election 1987: Northampton South[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Michael Morris 31,864 55.70
Labour John Dickie 14,061 24.58
Social Democratic George Hopkins 10,639 18.60
Green Margaret Hamilton 647 1.13
Majority 17,803 31.12
Turnout 75.21
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1983: Northampton South[21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Michael Morris 26,824 53.59
Social Democratic Keith Kyle 11,698 23.37
Labour M Coleman 11,533 23.04
Majority 15,126 30.22
Turnout 72.64
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1970sEdit

General election 1979: Northampton South
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Michael Morris 19,125 49.67
Labour Graham Mason 15,491 40.24
Liberal D Amey 3,478 9.03
National Front M James 407 1.06
Majority 3,634 9.44
Turnout 75.27
Conservative hold Swing
General election October 1974: Northampton South
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Michael Morris 14,393 42.98
Labour J Dilks 14,252 42.56
Liberal RF Miller 4,842 14.46
Majority 141 0.42
Turnout 75.52
Conservative hold Swing
General election February 1974: Northampton South
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Michael Morris 14,321 40.27
Labour J Dilks 14,142 39.77
Liberal RF Miller 7,099 19.96
Majority 179 0.50
Turnout 80.82
Conservative win (new seat)


See alsoEdit

Notes and referencesEdit

Notes
  1. ^ A borough constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
References
  1. ^ "England Parliamentary electorates 2010-2018". Boundary Commission for England. Retrieved 23 March 2019.
  2. ^ "Andrew Lewer MP". www.parliament.uk. Retrieved 12 September 2017.
  3. ^ Unemployment claimants by constituency The Guardian
  4. ^ "2011 census interactive maps". Archived from the original on 2016-01-29.
  5. ^ https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/static-reports/health-profiles/2019/e07000154.html?area-name=northampton
  6. ^ https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/static-reports/health-profiles/2019/e07000154.html?area-name=northampton
  7. ^ Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "N" (part 3)
  8. ^ https://twitter.com/RenewParty/status/1163845165007724544
  9. ^ "Prospective General Election Candidates". Green Party. Retrieved 12 October 2019.
  10. ^ "Here's What Renew Can Bring To An Autumn Election". Renew Party.
  11. ^ "BBC Local Live: Northamptonshire". BBC News.
  12. ^ "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  13. ^ "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  14. ^ [1] BBC Election Results for Northampton South
  15. ^ "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  16. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  17. ^ "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  18. ^ "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  19. ^ "Politics Resources". Election 1992. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Retrieved 2010-12-06.
  20. ^ "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  21. ^ "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.

Coordinates: 52°13′N 0°53′W / 52.22°N 0.89°W / 52.22; -0.89