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Night in Paradise is a 1946 American film produced by Walter Wanger and directed by Arthur Lubin.

Night in Paradise
Night in Paradise poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byArthur Lubin
Produced byWalter Wanger
Written byErnest Pascal
Based onthe novel, The Peacock's Feather
by George S. Hellman
StarringMerle Oberon
Gale Sondergaard
Turhan Bey
CinematographyW. Howard Greene
Hal Mohr
Edited byMilton Carruth
Production
company
Walter Wanger Productions
Distributed byUniversal Pictures
Release date
  • May 3, 1946 (1946-05-03)
Running time
84 min.
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$1,602,641[1]
Box office$2,032,486[1]

In 560 BC King Croesus of Lydia incurs the wrath of the sorceress Queen Attossa he had promised to marry, when he chooses the beautiful Delarai of Persia instead. Attossa, in disembodied form, mocks Croesus nearly to the point of madness, so he seeks a solution from the fortune-teller Aesop, who is very young and handsome, but believes that people only receive wisdom with age, arrived from the Isle of Samos in disguise of an old man with a hunch, a limp, and a cane. But Aesop also has eyes for Delarai.

This expensive, lavish Technicolor production of plaster Grecian temples and painted skies was Wanger's second attempt to film the novel, and ended up costing $1.6 million and losing Universal some $800,000. One source describes it as a kitschy "Maria Montez vehicle without Maria Montez".[2] (The correct title is Night in Paradise, not "A Night in Paradise" as some sources have it.)

Contents

PlotEdit

In 560 BC King Croesus of Lydia incurs the wrath of the sorceress Queen Attossa he had promised to marry, when he chooses the beautiful Delarai of Persia instead. Attossa, in disembodied form, mocks Croesus nearly to the point of madness, so he seeks a solution from the fortune-teller Aesop, who is very young and handsome, but believes that people only receive wisdom with age, arrived from the Isle of Samos in disguise of an old man with a hunch, a limp, and a cane. But Aesop also has eyes for Delarai. One day, Delarai invites Aesop to interpret a charm. As he does, he goes as his young self but with a different name, Jason. Delarai doesn't know at first, but as she sees the same scar on Jason's hand as Aesop's hand, she knows, and reveals that a hunch and a limp may be faked, but a scar remains a scar, and they fall in love with each other, but Atossa and the people in the palace suspect something is going on with Aesop and Delarai. Croesus wanted the Oracle to tell him the truth and sends Aesop to retrieve it. As Aesop is packing, Delarai talks him out of it but fails. Aesop goes anyway, and Delarai cries herself to sleep. Aesop does go fetch it from a priest, but the priest refuses, saying his life is valuable. Aesop claims that if a priest's words do not mean anything, then his life means less and strangles him. He takes the priest's clothes and hides his face in the hood. Delarai comes to the temple, wanting to seek for Aesop, but before she could say anything, Aesop reveals his young face slightly, and Delarai breaks out a smile. As the security guards see her smile, they unmask Aesop, and Aesop and Delarai run hand in hand. They are forced to jump off a cliff. They jump in each other arms, and Attosa reveals her image at sea, saying that Aesop and Delarai actually survived because of their faith, their love, and a little help from Attosa. They live in a small cottage with a lake and a garden. Delarai is mending and Aesop's hand around on her shoulder, 12 boys come out saying "daddy!" which reveals that they got married and have children. "Another fable to bed?" asks the eldest son. Aesop replies "not tonight, tonight is mommy's night." Delarai and Aesop smile and they have a family hug.

CastEdit

ProductionEdit

The film was announced in 1944 with Bey attached from the beginning. Louise Albritton was to star as well.[3]

ReceptionEdit

The film recorded a loss of $790,711.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Matthew Bernstein, Walter Wagner: Hollywood Independent, Minnesota Press, 2000 p442
  2. ^ Universal horrors: the studio's classic films, 1931-1946, by Tom Weaver, Michael Brunas, John Brunas, page 532
  3. ^ SCREEN NEWS HERE AND IN HOLLYWOOD: Louise Allbritton, Turhan Bey to Co-Star for Universal New York Times 9 June 1944: 20.

External linksEdit