Net worth

Net worth is the value of all the non-financial and financial assets owned by an institutional unit or sector minus the value of all its outstanding liabilities.[1] Since financial assets minus outstanding liabilities equal net financial assets, net worth can also be conveniently expressed as non-financial assets plus net financial assets. It can apply to companies, individuals, governments or economic sectors such as the sector of financial corporations or to entire countries.[2]

By entityEdit

CompaniesEdit

Net worth in business is also referred to as (own) equity. It is generally based on the value of all assets and liabilities at the carrying value which is the value as expressed on the financial statements. To the extent items on the balance sheet do not express their true (market) value, the net worth will also be inaccurate. On reading the balance sheet, if the accumulated losses exceed the shareholder's equity, net worth becomes negative.

Net worth in this formulation does not express the market value of a firm: a firm may be worth more (or less) if sold with a going concern.

Net worth vs. debt is a significant aspect of business loans. Business owners are required to "trade on equity" in order to further increase their net worth.[3] Capitalization of net worth can be achieved by investigating the equity of a loan debt scenario. Investigation of said scenario will increase the likelihood of a business growing their net worth exponentially.

IndividualsEdit

For individuals, net worth or wealth refers to an individual's net economic position, the value of the individual's assets minus liabilities. Examples of assets that an individual would factor into their net worth include retirement accounts, other investments, home(s), and vehicles. Liabilities include both secured debt (such as a home mortgage) and unsecured debt (such as consumer debt or personal loans). Typically intangible assets such as educational degrees are not factored into net worth, even though such assets positively contribute to one's overall financial position.

For a deceased individual, net worth can be used for the value of their estate when in probate.

Individuals with considerable net worth are listed as High-net-worth individuals and Ultra high-net-worth individuals.[4]

Furthermore, a deeper understanding of an individual's net worth can achieve two primary functions: improve your current financial standing and give a reference point for measuring progress towards your goals.[5]

Individual net worth growth takes time and significant progress can only be made through consistent saving. It is advisable to calculate net worth once or twice a year.[5]

GovernmentsEdit

Balance sheets that include all assets and liabilities can also be constructed for governments. Compared with government debt, a government's net worth is an alternative measure of the government's financial strength. Most governments utilize an accrual-based accounting system in order to provide a transparent picture of government operational costs. [6] Other governments may utilize cash accounting in order to better foresee future fiscal events. The accrual-based system is more effective, however, when dealing with the overall transparency of a government's spending. Massive governmental organizations rely on consistent and effective accounting in order to identify total net worth.

CountriesEdit

A country's net worth is calculated as the sum of the net worth of all companies and individuals resident in this country, plus the government's net worth. As for the United States, this measure is referred to as the financial position. To further elaborate, the United States has roughly $269.6 trillion dollars in assets.[7]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ System of National Accounts 2008, published by the European Commission, the International Monetary Fund, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the United Nations, and the World Bank, p. 49, section 3.109.
  2. ^ Ron Lieber (May 12, 2010). "Net-Worth Obsession". The New York Times.
  3. ^ Hardy, C.O. (1925). "The Ration of Net Worth to Debt". The University Journal of Business. 4 (1): 38–46. doi:10.1086/506818. JSTOR 2354605.
  4. ^ Ray Hutton (5 November 2006). "Rich spurn ultra-luxury cars". UK: The Sunday Times. Retrieved 10 September 2013.
  5. ^ a b "Your Personal Net Worth". schwabmoneywise.com. 2020. Retrieved 10 April 2020.
  6. ^ Shead, Bob (1999). "Measuring Governments' Net Worth". Agenda: A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform. 6 (4): 339–350. JSTOR 43199050.
  7. ^ Federal Reserve (2014-06-05). "Z.1 Financial Accounts of the United States - Flow of Funds, Balance Sheets, and Integrated Macroeconomic Accounts - First Quarter 2014" (PDF).

External linksEdit