Nathaniel M. Gorton

Nathaniel Matheson Gorton (born July 25, 1938) is an American lawyer who has served as a Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts since 1992.

Nathaniel M. Gorton
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts
Assumed office
September 24, 1992
Nominated byGeorge H. W. Bush
Preceded bySeat established by 104 Stat. 5089
Personal details
Born
Nathaniel Matheson Gorton

(1938-07-25) July 25, 1938 (age 82)
Evanston, Illinois, U.S.
RelativesSlade Gorton (brother)
EducationDartmouth College (AB)
Columbia Law School (LLB)
AwardsFederal Bar Association, Massachusetts chapter, Recognition Award for dedication and service (2015)
Military service
Branch/serviceUnited States Navy
Years of service1960-1962
RankLieutenant Junior Grade, and Executive Officer
UnitUSS Banner (AKL-25) in the Western Pacific Ocean

Early life and early legal careerEdit

Gorton was born in 1938 in Evanston, Illinois, the son of Ruth (Israel) and Thomas Slade Gorton, Jr.[1][2] His elder brother was Slade Gorton, who later became a U.S. Senator for Washington state.[3]

Gorton received an Artium Baccalaureus degree from Dartmouth College in 1960, and a Bachelor of Laws from Columbia Law School in 1966. He was in the United States Navy from 1960 to 1962, where he was a Lieutenant Junior Grade, and an Executive Officer on the USS Banner (AKL-25) in the Western Pacific Ocean.[4][5]

Gorton worked in private practice in Boston from 1966 to 1992, where he was an associate in the trial and business departments at Nutter McClennen & Fish until 1969, an associate at Powers & Hall PC from 1970 to 1974 and a partner at the latter firm from 1975 until 1992, practicing civil business litigation.[6][7][4]

Federal judicial serviceEdit

On April 28, 1992, Gorton was nominated by President George H. W. Bush to a new seat on the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts created by Section 203(a)(14) of the Civil Justice Reform Act of 1990 (Pub.L. 101–650, 104 Stat. 5100). He was confirmed by the United States Senate on September 23, 1992, and received his commission the following day.[3] In 2015 Gorton received the Federal Bar Association, Massachusetts chapter, Recognition Award for dedication and service.[4]

According to the USA Today in April 2019, Gorton "has a reputation for issuing stronger sentences than his peers," while Law360 stated that he "has a reputation for being a no-nonsense, fairly conservative judge."[8][9] He presided over the sentencing of many parents indicted in the 2019 College admissions bribery scandal, most notably, actress Lori Loughlin and her husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli, which saw the two of them sentenced to two months and five months in prison respectively.[10]

Other activitiesEdit

Gorton is a former Chair of the Board of Trustees of Buckingham Browne & Nichols School, an independent co-educational day school in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with students from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Current Biography Yearbook". 1993.
  2. ^ Moritz, Charles (1962). Current Biography Yearbook. ISBN 9780824201289.
  3. ^ a b "Gorton, Nathaniel M." Federal Judicial Center.
  4. ^ a b c d "FEDERAL COURT JUDGES sitting in MASSACHUSETTS," Biographies of Massachusetts Judges, 2019.
  5. ^ Charles Bruce Brownson (2011). "Gorton, Nathanial M.," Judicial Staff Directory.
  6. ^ "Nathaniel Gorton, United States District Court of Massachusetts: Profile & Biography," Bloomberg.
  7. ^ GORTON, NATHANIEL M., Judicial Profiles, Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly, August 1, 2001.
  8. ^ Joey Garrison (April 11, 2019). "College admissions case: Parents, feds accused of judge shopping", USA Today.
  9. ^ 'Varsity Blues' Judge Tough, Fair, And A Good Draw For Feds, Law360, April 11, 2019.
  10. ^ https://www.justice.gov/usao-ma/pr/california-couple-college-admissions-case-sentenced-prison

External linksEdit

SourcesEdit

Legal offices
Preceded by
Seat established by 104 Stat. 5089
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts
1992–present
Incumbent