NGC 1019

NGC 1019 is a barred spiral galaxy approximately 316 million light-years away from Earth in the constellation of Cetus.[2] It was discovered by French astronomer Édouard Stephan on December 1, 1880 with the 31" reflector at the Marseille Observatory.[4]

NGC 1019
NGC 1019 -HST05479 3f-606-asinh.png
NGC 1019 (NASA/ESA HST)
Observation data (J2000.0 epoch)
ConstellationCetus
Right ascension02h 38m 27.41s[1]
Declination+01° 54′ 27.79″[1]
Redshift0.024340[1]
Helio radial velocity7297 ± 20 km/s[1]
Distance316 Mly[2]
Apparent magnitude (V)13.60[3]
Apparent magnitude (B)14.40[3]
Characteristics
TypeSB(rs)bc[1]
Apparent size (V)1.0 × 0.9[1]
Other designations
UGC 2132, MCG+0-7-68, PGC 10006

NGC 1019 is classified as Type I Seyfert galaxy.[2] Its nuclei is surrounded by tight rings or annuli of star formation,[5] and the rings contain compact, young star clusters.[6]

NGC 1019 (SDSS)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f "NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database". ned.ipac.caltech.edu. Retrieved 4 December 2017.
  2. ^ a b c Xanthopoulos, E. (1996). "VRI CCD surface photometry of Seyfert 1, Seyfert 2 and intermediate Seyfert-type galaxies". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 280 (1): 6–28. Bibcode:1996MNRAS.280....6X. doi:10.1093/mnras/280.1.6.
  3. ^ a b "Revised NGC Data for NGC 1019". spider.seds.org. Retrieved December 9, 2017.
  4. ^ "Data for NGC 1019". www.astronomy-mall.com. Retrieved December 9, 2017.
  5. ^ "Closeup views of Seyfert nuclei from HST". pages.astronomy.ua.edu. Retrieved 4 December 2017.
  6. ^ "Star clusters in circumnuclear rings". ned.ipac.caltech.edu. Retrieved 4 December 2017.

External linksEdit