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Road at Mullanacre Lower townland, Tomregan, County Cavan, Ireland, heading west.

Mullanacre Lower is a townland in the Parish of Tomregan, Barony of Tullyhaw, County Cavan, Ireland.

Contents

EtymologyEdit

The townland name is an anglicisation of the Gaelic placename "Mullagh an Acre" which means ‘The acre of the summit’. In the 17th century it formed part of Carrowmore, County Cavan townland.

GeographyEdit

It is bounded on the north by Mullanacre Upper townland, on the east by Carrowmore, County Cavan townland, on the south by Drumane & Bofealan townlands and on the west by Moher townland. Its chief geographical features are the Crooked River (Ireland) and Slieve Rushen mountain, on whose southern slope it lies, reaching an altitude of over 600 feet (180 m) above sea-level. The townland is traversed by the N87 road (Ireland), Carrowmore Lane and other minor lanes. The townland covers 315 statute acres, including 1-acre (4,000 m2) of water.

HistoryEdit

It formed part of the Manor of Calva which was granted to Walter Talbot in 1610 as part of the Plantation of Ulster.

A deed dated 23 December 1811 now in the Cavan Archives Service (ref P017/0028) is described as-

Lease made between Henry John Clements, Ashfield lodge, esquire, and Hannah Story, Ballyconnell House, County Cavan, widow, committees of George Montgomery, Ballyconnell, County Cavan, esquire, a lunatic, and with the consent of Thomas, Lord Manners, Lord High Chancellor of Ireland, of the first part, the said George Montgomery, of the second part, and Thomas Patterson, Mullinacre, County Cavan, of the third part. Lease made in respect of that part of the town and lands of Mullanacre (Mullinacre) containing 33 acres and 3 roods. Lease to run for the natural lives of Princess Charlotte Augusta Caroline, daughter of George, Prince of Wales, and William Whittendale, aged 9 years, third son of Thomas Whittendale of Gortmoylan, county Fermanagh. Annual rent of £33.15.0 sterling. Tenant covenants to grind all corn, grain, meal and malt used and grown on the premises at Ballyconnell Mill. Penalty of 5 shillings per bushel ground elsewhere.

A deed dated 7 January 1851 now in the Cavan Archives Service (ref P017/0058) is described as-

Lease made between William Hamilton Enery, Ballyconnell House, County Cavan, esquire, and John Henderson, Mullinacre Lower, County Cavan, farmer, in respect of part of the town and lands of Mullanacre Lower (Mullinacre Lower), barony of Tullyhaw, County Cavan, containing 24 acres late Irish plantation measure. Lease to run for the natural lives of Victoria Adelaide Mary Louisa, Princess Royal of England, and Albert Edward, Prince of Wales. Annual rent of £12 sterling. Henderson covenants that he will do suit and service at the Court of the Manor of Gwyllym Brooke and pay the seneschal thereof fees and perform all customs of the Manor.

The Tithe Applotment Books for 1827 list the following tithepayers in the townland- Henderson, Hewitt, McCabe, Donahey.[1]

The Ordnance Survey Name Books for 1836 give the following description of the townland- South-west of parish. This in old times was part of Carramore. Property of Montgomery. Rent 16 shillings to £1 per arable acre. 70 acres of mountain and pasture. Sandy soil. A Danish fort, 2 quarries. Poor natives. Old and new roads.

The 1841 Census of Ireland gives a population of 23 in Mullanacre Lower, of which 13 were males and 10 were females, with 4 houses.

The 1851 Census of Ireland gives a population of 18, a decrease of 5 on the 1841 figure, due to the intervening Irish Famine of 1845–47, of which 9 were males and 9 were females, with 4 houses. The decrease was larger in the male population.

Griffith's Valuation of 1857 lists the landlord of the townland as the Annesley Estate & the tenants as Donohoe, McBrien, Henderson, Graham, Reilly, McKiernan, Armstrong, McGovern, Kelliher and Annesley.[2]

In 1861 the population of the townland was 33, being 20 males and 13 females. There were six houses in the townland, all were inhabited.[3]

In 1871 the population of the townland was 56, being 28 males and 28 females. There were eleven houses in the townland, all were inhabited (page 297 of census).[4]

In 1881 the population of the townland was 53, being 30 males and 23 females. There were eleven houses in the townland, all were inhabited.[5]

In 1891 the population of the townland was 69, being 40 males and 29 females. There were twelve houses in the townland, all were inhabited.[6]

In the 1901 census of Ireland, there are fourteen families listed in the townland.[7]

In the 1911 census of Ireland, there are eleven families listed in the townland.[8]

In the Dúchas School's Collection at [9] is a description of Mullanacre in 1938.

AntiquitiesEdit

  1. A medieval earthen ringfort south of the Bawnboy Road, (Site number 1019, page 128, Mullanacre Lower townland, in "Archaeological Inventory of County Cavan", Patrick O’Donovan, 1995, where it is described as- Raised circular area (int. dims. 29.2m E-W; 27.5m N-S) enclosed by a low earthen bank and a largely infilled fosse abutted by a modern field boundary from E-S-NW. Break in bank at E probably represents original entrance).
  2. Old quarries.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ [1]Tithe Applotment Books 1827
  2. ^ lower
  3. ^ [2]
  4. ^ [3]
  5. ^ [4]
  6. ^ [5]
  7. ^ [6]Census of Ireland 1901
  8. ^ [7]. Census of Ireland 1911.
  9. ^ [8]

External linksEdit