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In the higher education system of the United States, minority-serving institutions (abbreviated MSI) make up a category of educational establishments (federally recognized Title IV colleges and universities) based on enrollment criteria (typically the percentage of enrolled minorities at a particular school). Such schools are eligible for federal funding under Title III of the Higher Education Act of 1965.[1] Until 2007, no federal legislation existed concerning Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Serving Institutions. The College Cost Reduction and Access Act of 2007 made history, because it federally recognized the existence of Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) serving institutions, making them eligible to be designated as minority serving institutions.[2]

Legal DefinitionsEdit

Seven categories of MSI are defined in US law under Title III of the Higher Education Act of 1965:

  1. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) – institutions founded prior to the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that were created primarily to educate African Americans (e.g. Howard University and Texas Southern University)[3]
  2. Predominantly Black Institutions (PBI) – institutions that do not meet the legal definition of HBCUs, but primarily serve African Americans. Eligibility is based on serving an undergraduate population that is both low income (at least 50% receiving Title IV needs-based assistance) and in which African American students constitute at least 40% [4] (e.g. Georgia State University and Community College of Philadelphia).
  3. Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSI) – institutions that serve an undergraduate population that is both low income (at least 50% receiving Title IV needs-based assistance) and in which Hispanic students constitute at least 25%[5] (e.g. University of Texas at El Paso, Fresno Pacific University and University of Texas Rio Grande Valley).
  4. Tribal Colleges or Universities (TCU) - institutions of higher education which are formally controlled, or have been formally sanctioned, or chartered, by the governing body of an Native American tribe[6] (e.g. Dine College).
  5. Native American Non-Tribal Institutions (NANTI) - institutions other than TCUs that serve an undergraduate population that is both low income (at least 50% receiving Title IV needs-based assistance) and in which American Indian students constitute at least 10%[7] (e.g. Southeastern Oklahoma State University).
  6. Alaskan Native- or Native Hawaiian-Serving Institutions (ANNHI) - institutions that serve an undergraduate population that is both low income (at least 50% receiving Title IV needs-based assistance) and in which Alaska Native students constitute at least 20% or Hawaiian Native students constitute at least 10%[8] (e.g. University of Alaska Fairbanks and University of Hawaii at Manoa).
  7. Asian American- and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISI) - institutions that serve an undergraduate population that is both low income (at least 50% receiving Title IV needs-based assistance) and in which Asian American or Native American Pacific Islander students constitute at least 10%[9] (e.g. University of California, Los Angeles and University of Guam).

Strengthening Institutions Program (SIP) institutions serve a low income undergraduate population (at least 50% receiving Title IV needs-based assistance)[10] and are eligible for federal funding under Title III of the Higher Education Act of 1965. However, as there are no requirements for minority enrollment under Title III Part A, these institutions are not considered MSIs.

Executive OrdersEdit

Specific Executive Orders currently referencing MSIs include:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Gasman, Marybeth; Benjamin Baez; Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner (2008). Understanding minority-serving institutions. SUNY Press. ISBN 978-0-7914-7359-7.
  2. ^ Chen, Edith Wen-Chu (2010). Encyclopedia of Asian American Issues Today. 1. ABC-CLIO. p. 177. ISBN 978-0-313-34751-1.
  3. ^ 20 U.S.C. § 1061
  4. ^ 20 U.S.C. § 1059e
  5. ^ 20 U.S.C. § 1101a
  6. ^ 20 U.S.C. § 1059c
  7. ^ 20 U.S.C. § 1067q
  8. ^ 20 U.S.C. § 1059d
  9. ^ 20 U.S.C. § 1059g
  10. ^ 20 U.S.C. § 1058
  11. ^ 82 FR 12499
  12. ^ 66 FR 52841
  13. ^ 67 FR 45288
  14. ^ 69 FR 25293
  15. ^ 74 FR 53635

External linksEdit