Minerva Foundation

The Minerva Foundation is a US-based non-profit, scientific and charitable foundation. It is headquartered in Berkeley, California. It was established in 1983 by Helen and Elwin Marg.[1] Other than the founders, directors include Richard M. Buxbaum, Lawrence W. Stark, Semir Zeki, Tamia Marg Anderson, Lila S. Crutchfield, and Vero Bollow.

Minerva Foundation
Founded1983
FounderHelen and Elwin Marg
TypeCorporation
FocusNeuroscience
Location
Area served
US
MethodResearch
Awards
Websitehttp://www.minervaberkeley.org

The foundation was named after Minerva, the Roman goddess of, among other things, wisdom and medicine.[2]

FocusEdit

Minerva Foundation is a not-for-profit, charitable foundation, dedicated to promoting novel approaches to the study of the visual brain. Since its inception in 1983, the foundation has honored exceptional scientists with its Golden Brain award and brought leading research to the general public through its series of conferences and other forums on creativity, perception, and brain science.

Minerva HouseEdit

Minerva Foundation maintains a large Victorian building originally built for Charles C. Boudrow (c. 1830–1918), a Massachusetts-born master mariner, in downtown Berkeley near the University of California at Berkeley campus. The house was designated a City of Berkeley Landmark on 21 June 1976. It was bought by Frank Leba and Kelly Brown in 1994, who restored and renovated the entire building. They even received a BAHA Preservation Award in 2006.[3][4] The Minerva foundation finally acquired it in 2008.[citation needed]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Gerald Westheimer (2010). "IN MEMORIAM: Elwin Marg". senate.universityofcalifornia.edu. University of California. Archived from the original on 7 September 2014. Retrieved 4 September 2013.
  2. ^ Minerva. "About Minerva Foundation". www.minervaberkeley.org. Minerva Foundation. Retrieved 4 September 2013.
  3. ^ Daniella Thompson (8 September 2006). "East Bay Then and Now: Shipping Magnate's Mansion Is Rare Survivor on Oxford Street". The Berkeley Daily Planet. Retrieved 4 September 2013.
  4. ^ Daniella Thompson (2006). "Captain Charles C. Boudrow House". berkeleyheritage.com. Retrieved 4 September 2013.

External linksEdit