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Coordinates: 38°58′N 77°44′W / 38.967°N 77.733°W / 38.967; -77.733

Middleburg AVA
Wine region
TypeAmerican Viticultural Area
Year establishedSeptember 13, 2012; 7 years ago (2012-09-13)[1][2]
Years of wine industry40
CountryUSA
Part ofVirginia
Growing season211 days
Climate regionHumid subtropical
Soil conditionsGranite-based clay
Total area126,720 acres (51,282 ha)[3]
Varietals producedMerlot, Chardonnay, Cabernet Franc, Nebbiolo, Cabernet Sauvignon, Riesling[4]
No. of wineries24[5]

The Middleburg AVA is an American Viticultural Area in the northern Piedmont region of Virginia, 50 miles (80 km) west of Washington, D.C.. It is named for the town of Middleburg, Virginia and is bounded by the Potomac River to the north and by mountains in other directions.[6][7] The hardiness zone of the AVA is 7a.

HistoryEdit

In 1972, owners of Meredyth Vineyards in Middleburg planted 2,300 vines. That vineyard went on to expand to 60 acres (24 ha). The number of vineyards grew over the years until Rachel Martin, Executive Vice President of Boxwood Winery solely petitioned the Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau to establish the AVA.[7]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Establishment of the Middleburg Virginia Viticultural Area". Federal Register. 27 CFR Part 9. September 13, 2012.
  2. ^ "US Treasury Approves Middleburg AVA 7th Virginia AVA Joins 9 Virginia Wine Regions Archived 2013-03-25 at the Wayback Machine" (press release). Virginia Wine. September 28, 2012.
  3. ^ "American Viticultural Areas by State". Wine Institute on American Viticultural Areas. January 27, 2017. Archived from the original on January 27, 2008.
  4. ^ "Monticello (AVA): Appellation Description." Appellation America. Retrieved January 30, 2008.
  5. ^ "Middleburg Virginia AVA". Appellation America. Retrieved July 10, 2017.
  6. ^ Cattell, Hudson; McKee, Linda Jones. "TTB Approves Middleburg Virginia AVA". Wines and Vines. September 19, 2012.
  7. ^ a b Baratk, Trevor. "The Middleburg AVA; ‘Epicurience’ update; and ‘Virginia Uncorked’". Loudon Times|. April 3, 2013.

External linksEdit