Michael Finnegan (song)

"Michael Finnegan" (variant spellings include Michael Finnagen and Michael Vinnegan) is an example of an unboundedly long song, which can continue with numerous variations until the singer decides (or is forced) to stop. Like most other perpetual songs, this song tends to be sung by schoolchildren. It is a popular song often sung around a campfire or during scouting events. The origin of the words and music is unknown, but the tune bears similarity to "Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush". The earliest documented reference is The Hackney Scout Song Book (Stacy & Son Ltd, 1921). It also appears in The Oxford song book, vol.2, collected and arranged by Thomas Wood (Oxford University Press, 1927). The song is most famous in Ireland.

One set of lyricsEdit

There once was a man named Michael Finn-egan,
He grew whiskers on his chin-igan,
The wind came up and blew them in-again,
Poor old Michael Finnegan. Begin-again.

There once was a man named Michael Finn-egan,
He kicked up an awful din-igan.
Because they said he must not sing again.
Poor old Michael Finnegan. Begin-again.

There once was a man named Michael Finn-egan,
Ran a race and tried to win again.
Got so puffed that he had to go in again.
Poor old Michael Finnegan. Begin-again.

There once was a man named Michael Finn-egan,
He drank through all his good gin again.
And so he wasted all his tin again,
Poor old Michael Finnegan. Begin again.

There once was a man named Michael Finn-egan,
He went fishing with a pin again.
He caught a fish but dropped it in again,
Poor old Michael Finnegan. Begin again.

There once was a man named Michael Finn-egan,
Climbed a tree and barked his shin-igan,
Took off several yards of skin-igan,
Poor old Michael Finnegan. Begin-again.

There once was a man named Michael Finn-egan,
He grew fat and then grew thin again.
Then he died and had to begin again.
Poor old Michael Finnegan. The end-i-gin.

ReferencesEdit