A mechanic is an artisan, skilled tradesperson, or technician who uses tools to build, maintain, or repair machinery,[1] especially cars.

Mechanic
Lewis Hine Power house mechanic working on steam pump.jpg
A mechanic at a steam pump in an electric power house, 1920, (from a photo study for the Works Progress Administration (WPA)).
Occupation
Occupation type
Vocational
Activity sectors
Industrial
Description
Education required
Apprenticeship
Related jobs
Repairman, Technician

DutiesEdit

Most mechanics specialize in a particular field, such as auto body mechanics, air conditioning and refrigeration mechanics, auto mechanics, bicycle mechanics, boiler mechanics, and other areas.[2]

A mechanic is typically certified by a trade association or regional government power. Mechanics may be separated into two classes based on the type of machines they work on, heavyweight and lightweight. Heavyweight work is on larger machines or heavy equipment, such as tractors and trailers, while lightweight work is on smaller items, such as automotive engines.

Automotive mechanics/automotive techniciansEdit

Automotive technicians (the modern term of reference) have many trades within. Some may specialize in the electrical diagnosis, while others may specialize in the mechanical aspects. Other mechanical areas include: brakes and steering, suspension, automatic or manual transmission, engine repairs, auto body repairs or diagnosing customer complaints.

Automotive technicians require many years of training to become a licensed technician. Countries such as Canada have a governmental certification body that tests and maintains automotive technicians qualifications.[3] The United States of America uses an organization that is called ASE.[4] This organization provides independent testing of a technicians skills with over 57 different tests that can be taken.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1980 Census of Population: Classified Index of Industries and Occupations. U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 1982. p. O-68. Retrieved December 18, 2017.
  2. ^ Henderson, C.J.; Dolphin, J.; Fehl, P.; Davenport, R. (2010). Career Opportunities in the Armed Forces. Career Opportunities Series. Facts On File, Incorporated. p. 230. ISBN 978-1-4381-1062-2. Retrieved December 18, 2017.
  3. ^ "Economic Development, Investment and Trade | Province of Manitoba".
  4. ^ "Test Series".