May 2004 Caribbean floods

The May 2004 Caribbean floods were a flood event that took place in the Caribbean Islands, mainly Hispaniola and some parts of Northern Puerto Rico from May 18, 2004, to May 25, 2004.[1] The storm caused significant rainfall, with over 9.7 inches of rain falling at the most in Haiti, and 10 inches falling at the most in the Dominican Republic.[2] These floods were caused by over two weeks of persistent rain in the Caribbean area, which eventually caused the landslides that killed many people.[3] The floods caused much damage in Haiti and the Dominican Republic, with over 1,300 homes being destroyed and about 2,000 people being killed.[2] Due to this destruction, nearly 15,000 people were displaced with nowhere to live.[4] The area that felt the worst of the flooding was the town of Jimaní, near the border of Haiti and the Dominican Republic.[5] In fact, the destruction present at Jimaní was so bad that Dominican president Hipolito Mejia declared a national day of mourning after seeing the effects of the storm.[4]

May 2004 Caribbean floods
Satellite image of flooding in Hispaniola (2004).jpg
Satellite image of convection affecting Hispaniola
DateMay 18 – 25, 2004
LocationGreater Antilles, mostly Hispaniola
DeathsAbout 2,000

Meteorological historyEdit

A broad low pressure area developed over Central America on May 19, accompanied by heavy rainfall.[6] The system drifted eastward into the Caribbean Sea,[7] and by May 23 was located in the central Caribbean, producing rainfall across Jamaica, eastern Cuba, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico. Upper-level winds prevented tropical cyclogenesis of the system.[8] However, the low had characteristics of a subtropical cyclone, with a closed atmospheric circulation and extensive convection extending to the northeast of the system. The interaction between the low and a high pressure area over the southwestern Atlantic Ocean produced winds of around 25 mph (40 km/h) across the region.[7]

The system moved slowly across the Greater Antilles.[7] By early on May 24, the low was located south of Haiti and was interacting with a tropical wave.[9] Later that day, the system moved over southwestern Haiti,[10] crossing into the Bahamas by May 25.[11] Later that day, the National Hurricane Center briefly noted the possibility of the system developing into a tropical cyclone, noting its well-defined circulation. Although there was a lack of convection near the center, there was a potential for the shear to diminish.[12] However, by late on May 26, the system no longer had a chance for development after it began moving quickly to the northeast.[13] By May 27, the system was located about 190 mi (305 km) east of Bermuda, connected to a trough that extended to Hispaniola.[14]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "2004 Flood Archive". Dartmouth College. Retrieved 2008-05-16.
  2. ^ a b "Global Hazards and Significant Events: May 2004". NOAA. Retrieved 2008-05-16.
  3. ^ "Hundreds dead in Caribbean floods". BBC News. May 26, 2004. Retrieved 2008-05-16.
  4. ^ a b "At least 900 dead in Caribbean flooding". CNN. May 28, 2004. Retrieved March 30, 2016.
  5. ^ "Severe Floods Sweep Across Haiti and the Dominican Republic". Earth Observatory. NASA.
  6. ^ Jarvinen/Avila (2004-05-19). Special Tropical Disturbance Statement (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2012-04-14.
  7. ^ a b c Gary Padgett. "Monthly Global Tropical Cyclone Summary May 2004". Retrieved 2012-04-14.
  8. ^ James Franklin (2004-05-23). Special Tropical Disturbance Statement (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2012-04-14.
  9. ^ Mike Wallace (2004-05-24). Tropical Weather Discussion (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2012-04-14.
  10. ^ Pralgo (2004-05-24). Tropical Weather Discussion (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2012-04-14.
  11. ^ MT (2004-05-25). Tropical Weather Discussion (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2012-04-14.
  12. ^ Blake (2004-05-25). Tropical Weather Discussion (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2012-04-14.
  13. ^ Blake (2004-05-26). Tropical Weather Discussion (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2012-04-14.
  14. ^ MT (2004-05-27). Tropical Weather Discussion (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved 2012-04-14.