Master Romi (born Mohammed Salim) is a former Indian actor in Hindi language films.[1] He was best known as a child actor after his brilliant performance in K.A. Abbas’s film “Munna” released in 1954. “Munna”, the first songless Hindi movie was screened for a select audience including India's first Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru. Nehru was so moved by child star Master Romi’s performance that he invited him for breakfast the next morning along with entire unit.[2][3][4]

Master Romi
Born
Mohammed Salim
OccupationActor
Notable workMunna (1954); Hum Panchhi Ek Daal Ke (1957)

CareerEdit

He made his screen debut in Sohrab Modi’sJhansi Ki Rani” and later played important roles in “Shole,” “Footpath,” “Dil-e-Nadaan,” “Paapi”, “Toote Khilone” and Hum Panchhi Ek Daal Ke.

In 1958, a Hindi film adaptation called Do Phool (Two Flowers) was released based on the Swiss literary novel/ icon Heidi. The role of Heidi – called Poornima in the film – was played by Baby Naaz who was one of the most famous child stars at the time along with Master Romi.[5][6][7][8][9]

FilmographyEdit

Year Film Character/Role
1960 Maa Baap Kundan
1958 Do Phool Jaggu
1957 Yahudi Eliza
1957 Ab Dilli Dur Nahin Ratan
1957 Dushman Young Ram Singh
1957 Hum Panchhi Ek Dal Ke Rajendranath Mehra "Rajan"
1956 Ek Hi Raasta Boy in Raja's birthday (singing "Bade Bhaiya Laya Hai")
1955 Jawab Young Amar Kumar Dayal
1954 Munna Munna
1954 Toote Khilone
1953 Dil-E-Nadan
1953 Footpath Monu
1953 Papi Raju's Atma
1953 Shole

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Narratives of Indian Cinema. Primus Books, 2009. 2009. pp. 136, 137, 138. ISBN 9788190891844. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  2. ^ "Master Romi – Profile & Filmography". Cineplot.com. Retrieved 19 July 2020.
  3. ^ "Unknown facets in the life of austere Indira". ABP Live. Retrieved 19 July 2020.
  4. ^ "Master Romi". British Film Institute. British Film Institute. Retrieved 31 July 2020.
  5. ^ "Swiss literary icon Heidi ready for her Hindi debut". SWI swissinfo.ch. SWI swissinfo.ch - a branch of Swiss Broadcasting Corporation SRG SSR. Retrieved 15 July 2020.
  6. ^ Bless You Bollywood!: A Tribute to Hindi Cinema on Completing 100 Years Paperback. Trafford (June 5, 2012). 5 June 2012. p. 76. ISBN 978-1466939639. Retrieved 31 July 2020.
  7. ^ Asian Children's Literature and Film in a Global Age: Local, National, and Transnational Trajectories (1st ed. 2020) (Asia-Pacific and Literature in English). Springer Singapore, Singapore. 13 April 2020. p. 154. ISBN 9789811526312. Retrieved 31 July 2020.
  8. ^ Neta Abhineta: Bollywood Star Power in Indian Politics. Hachette India. 25 September 2018. ISBN 978-9350098028. Retrieved 31 July 2020.
  9. ^ 24 Akbar Road: A Short History Of The People Behind The Fall And Rise Of The Congress Hardcover. Hachette India Local. 15 July 2011. ISBN 978-9350090770. Retrieved 31 July 2020.

External linksEdit