March 1960 lunar eclipse

Total Lunar Eclipse
March 13, 1960
(No photo)
Lunar eclipse chart close-1960Mar13.png
The moon passes west to east (right to left) across the Earth's umbral shadow, shown in hourly intervals.
Series 122 (53 of 75)
Gamma -0.1799
Magnitude 1.5145
Duration (hr:mn:sc)
Totality 1:33:59
Partial 3:39:23
Penumbral 5:44:47
Contacts UTC
P1 5:35:57
U1 6:38:39
U2 7:41:21
Greatest 8:28:21
U3 9:15:21
U4 10:18:03
P4 11:20:45

A total lunar eclipse took place on Sunday, March 13, 1960. The moon passed through the center of the Earth's shadow.[1]

This is the 53rd member of Lunar Saros 122. The next event is the March 1978 lunar eclipse.

This eclipse afforded astrophysicist Richard W. Shorthill the opportunity to make the first infrared pyrometric temperature scans of the lunar surface, and led to his discovery of the first lunar "hot spot" observed from Earth. Shorthill found that the temperature of the floor of the Tycho crater was 216° Kelvin (—57° C), significantly higher than the 160°K (—113° C) in the area around the crater.[2]

VisibilityEdit

It was visible from North America, seen rising from Australia, and eastern Asia, and setting from South America, western Europe and Africa.

 

Related lunar eclipsesEdit

Lunar year seriesEdit

Lunar eclipse series sets from 1958–1962
Ascending node   Descending node
Saros Date
Viewing
Type
Chart
Saros Date
Viewing
Type
Chart
102 1958 Apr 4
 
Penumbral
 
112 1959 Mar 24
 
Partial
 
117 1959 Sep 17
 
Penumbral
 
122 1960 Mar 13
 
Total
 
127 1960 Sep 5
 
Total
 
132 1961 Mar 2
 
Partial
 
137 1961 Aug 26
 
Partial
 
142 1962 Feb 19
 
Penumbral
 
147 1962 Aug 15
 
Penumbral
 
Last set 1958 May 3 Last set 1958 Oct 27
Next set 1963 Jan 9 Next set 1962 Jul 17

Saros seriesEdit

It was part of Saros series 122.

Tritos seriesEdit

TzolkinexEdit

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Hermit Eclipse: Saros cycle 122
  2. ^ F. Link, Eclipse Phenomena in Astronomy (Springer, 2012) p119

External linksEdit