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Magpi is a software company, founded in 2003 by Joel Selanikio and Rose Donna under the name DataDyne, and is based in Washington, D.C., USA and Nairobi, Kenya.[citation needed]

Magpi, Inc.
IndustrySoftware
Founded2003 (as DataDyne)
HeadquartersWashington, D.C., USA
Key people
Joel Selanikio (CEO, Co-founder)
Rose Donna (COO, Co-founder)
ProductsMagpi (home.magpi.com)
Websitehome.magpi.com

The company's origins were detailed by Selanikio in a 2013 TED talk: "The Big Data Revolution in Health".[1][2]

Contents

UsersEdit

Magpi has been used by the WHO and others as part of evaluation efforts for the Global Polio Eradication Initiative.[3]

In 2014, Magpi was used by the Instituto Nacional Saude Publica in Guinea-Bissau in a pilot investigation of SMS disease reporting.[4]

Magpi continues to be used by the IFRC in the Central African Republic since 2013 to improve reporting from health facilities in conflict areas.[5]

AwardsEdit

Magpi has received numerous awards, including:

  • 21st Century Achievement Award for Collaboration – The Computer World (2012)[6]
  • FRIDA Award for contributing to the information society in Latin America (2010)
  • Wall Street Journal Technology Innovation Award for Healthcare (2009)[7]
  • The Tech Museum Award (2008)[8]
  • The Stockholm Challenge Award (2008)[9]
  • Social Enterprise of the Year – Fast Company (2009)[10]
  • The World Bank's Development Marketplace Competition (2003)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The big-data revolution in healthcare". TED.com. Retrieved 8 March 2017.
  2. ^ Selanikio, Joel. "Joel Selanikio - Speaker - TED.com". TED.com. Retrieved 8 March 2017.
  3. ^ "GPEI-". PolioEradication.org. Retrieved 8 March 2017.
  4. ^ Daily zero-reporting for suspect Ebola using short message service (SMS) in Guinea-Bissau
  5. ^ "IFRC-RAMP-CAR-2016.pdf" (PDF). Dropbox.com. Retrieved 8 March 2017.
  6. ^ "Harnessing the computing power of low-cost mobile phones". ComputerWorld.com.au. Retrieved 8 March 2017.
  7. ^ Plank, Willa (27 September 2010). "They Won. And Then What?". Retrieved 8 March 2017 – via www.wsj.com.
  8. ^ "Past Laureates". TheTech.org. 1 September 2015. Retrieved 8 March 2017.
  9. ^ "The winners in the Stockholm Challenge Award 2008". Telecentre.org. Retrieved 8 March 2017.
  10. ^ "The 10 Best Social Enterprises of 2009 - Fast Company - The Future Of Business". FastCompany.com. 1 December 2008. Retrieved 8 March 2017.

External linksEdit