Maggie Scarf

Maggie Scarf (born Margaret Klein; May 13, 1932) is an American writer, journalist, and lecturer. Her award-winning books and articles specialize in women, family relationships, and marriage in particular, including the best-selling books Unfinished Business: Pressure Points in the Lives of Women (Doubleday, 1980) and Intimate Partners: Patterns in Love and Marriage (Random House, 1987).[1] She is a former Visiting Fellow at the Whitney Humanities Center, Yale University, and at Jonathan Edwards College, Yale University, as well as a Senior Fellow at the Bush Center in Child Development and Social Policy at Yale. She was for many years a Contributing Editor to The New Republic, and a member of the advisory board of the American Psychiatric Press. Maggie Scarf lives in Sag Harbor, NY with her husband Herbert Scarf, the Sterling Professor (Emeritus as of 2010) of Economics at Yale University. She is the mother of three adult daughters, Susan Scarf Merrell, Martha Samuelson, and Betsy S. Stone. She has eight grandchildren.

Public and media appearancesEdit

Maggie Scarf has lectured widely, and made a great number of television appearances (Oprah Winfrey, 5 times; Phil Donohue; The David Letterman Show; CBS News; Good Morning America; The Today Show; and many radio shows including Larry King.) She has been interviewed extensively on radio and for magazines and newspapers across the nation.

She currently blogs for Psychology Today.[2]

BibliographyEdit

  • Body, Mind, Behavior, New Republic Press, 1976, ISBN 0440307651
  • Unfinished Business: Pressure Points in the Lives of Women, Doubleday and Co., Inc., 1980, ISBN 0345471733
  • Intimate Partners: Patterns in Love and Marriage, Random House, 1987, ISBN 039455485X[3]
  • Intimate Worlds: How Families Thrive and Why They Fail, Ballantine Books, 1997, ISBN 0345406672
  • Meet Ben Franklin, Random House Books for Young Readers, 2002, ISBN 0375815244
  • Secrets, Lies, Betrayals: How the Body Holds the Secrets of a Life, and How to Unlock Them, Ballantine Books, 2005; Reprint edition. ISBN 0345481178
  • September Songs: The Good News About Marriage in the Later Years, Riverhead, 2009, ISBN 978-1594483998[4]
  • The Remarriage Blueprint: How Remarried Couples and Their Families Succeed or Fail, Scribner, 2013, ISBN 978-1439169544

Representative ArticlesEdit

Honors, Fellowships, and PrizesEdit

  • Ford Foundation Fellow, 1973–74
  • Nieman Fellow in Journalism (Harvard) 1975-76[5]
  • Fellow, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, 1977–78
  • Alicia Patterson Foundation Fellow, 1978–79[6]
  • Fellow, Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, 1985–86
  • Grantee, The Smith Richardson Foundation, Inc., 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994
  • National Media Award, American Psychological Foundation, 1971
  • First Prize, National Media Award, American Psychological Foundation, 1974
  • National Media Award, American Psychological Foundation, 1977
  • Connecticut United Nations Award: Outstanding Connecticut Women, 1987
  • Connecticut Psychological Association: Certificate of Appreciation, "in recognition of her contribution to the public understanding of psychological knowledge," 1988
  • Certificate of Commendation, Robert T. Morse Writer's Competition, American Psychiatric Association, 1997
  • Honoree of the New York State Society for Clinical Social Work, 1998

Professional MembershipsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Nov 1986 | Intimate Partners | Scarf". The Atlantic. 2003-02-14. Retrieved 2014-05-28. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "Maggie Scarf". Psychology Today. Retrieved 2014-05-28. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ Wolitzer, Hilma. "This Old Marriage". New York Times.
  4. ^ Wolitzer, Hilma. "Maggie Scarf's September Songs. New York Times.
  5. ^ http://nieman.harvard.edu/alumni/class-of-1976/
  6. ^ http://aliciapatterson.org/users/maggie-scarf

External linksEdit