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Ma Sheng-kuei (pinyin: Ma Shenggui, Xiao'erjing: ﻣَﺎ ﺷْﻊ ﻗُﻮ‎) was a Chinese Muslim general of the 36th Division (National Revolutionary Army), who served under Generals Ma Zhongying and Ma Hushan. His grew up in Gansu and Shaanxi in "bad company". Ma practiced banditry was noted for torturing his victims in Ningxia. He joined Ma Zhongying in 1933, and was appointed commander of the Tungan 2nd brigade at Khotan. His troops seized the Fayzabad-Maral-Bashi area.[1] Facing the Soviet Red Army and Sheng Shicai's provincial troops, he defected while at Fazayabad and joined the forces of Sheng Shicai, turning against Ma Hushan's forces at Kashgar.[2][3] Later Ma was stationed in Khotan and it is thought that he went back to Gansu.[4] British diplomatic say he possibly received bribes from Sheng to join Sheng's forces.[5]

Ma Sheng-kuei
BornGansu
AllegianceFlag of the Republic of China Republic of China
Years of service1933-1937
RankGeneral
Unit2nd Brigade of the 36th Division (National Revolutionary Army)
Commands heldGeneral of the 2nd brigade in the 36th Division (National Revolutionary Army)
Battles/warsKumul Rebellion, Xinjiang War (1937)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 142. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved 2010-06-28.
  2. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 143. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved 2010-06-28.
  3. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 144. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved 2010-06-28.
  4. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 246. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved 2010-06-28.
  5. ^ Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 309. ISBN 0-521-25514-7. Retrieved 2010-06-28.

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