Lyn Mikel Brown

Lyn Mikel Brown (born February 12, 1956) is an American academic, author, feminist, and community activist. She is Professor of Education at Colby College in Waterville, Maine. Her research interests include girls development, youth activism, and sexualization and objectification of girls by the media and marketers. She is a co-founder of the research-driven nonprofit, Hardy Girls Healthy Women, and the SPARK activist movement against the sexualization of girls in the media. She has authored six books and many peer-reviewed articles, general media articles, and book chapters. She was inducted into the Maine Women's Hall of Fame in 2013.[1]

Lyn Mikel Brown
Born (1956-02-12) February 12, 1956 (age 65)
NationalityAmerican
Children1
AwardsMaine Women's Hall of Fame, 2013
Academic background
EducationB.S. psychology, Ottawa University, 1979
Ed.D., Harvard Graduate School of Education, 1989
Thesis[Thesis "Narratives of Relationship: The development of a care voice in girls ages 7 to 16"] (1989)
Doctoral advisorCarol Gilligan
Academic work
DisciplineEducation and human development
InstitutionsColby College
Main interestsGirl development, youth activism, sexualization and objectification of girls by the media and marketers
Notable worksMeeting at the Crossroads: Women's psychology and girls' development (1992, with Carol Gilligan)
Websitehttp://web.colby.edu/lynmikelbrown/

Early life and educationEdit

Lyn Mikel Brown was born in Vanceboro, Maine,[2] to Linwood C. Brown, a railroad engineer, and Diana A. Main Brown, a nurse.[3][4] She has two brothers and a sister.[3]

After graduating from Calais High School, she studied psychology at the University of Maine from 1974 to 1976, sociology at the University of Kent from 1976 to 1977, and psychology at Ottawa University from 1977 to 1979; she earned her bachelor's degree at the latter institution.[5] From 1983 to 1989 she pursued her graduate degree at Harvard Graduate School of Education, earning her Ed.D. in human development and psychology.[5] She did post-doctoral research in the Harvard Project on Women's Psychology and Girls' Development at the Harvard Graduate School of Education from 1989 to 1991, and also taught for a year at HGSE.[6]

CareerEdit

In 1991 Brown joined the faculty of Colby College as assistant professor of education and human development. She was promoted to associate professor in 1998 and to full professor in 2005.[6]

In 2000[5] she co-founded Hardy Girls Healthy Women, a research-driven nonprofit. Through the HGHW Girls' Advisory Board, she initiated the online teen blog and youth activism website, Powered by Girl.[7] In 2010[5] she co-founded, with Deborah Tolman, the SPARK (Sexualization Protest: Action Resistance Knowledge) activist movement against the sexualization and objectification of girls aged 13–22 in the media. Among the latter group's efforts was a 2012 Change.org petition against Lego Friends for targeting girls with a new line of skinny, buxom female characters.[8]

WritingEdit

Brown's first book, co-authored with Carol Gilligan, was Meeting at the Crossroads: Women's psychology and girls' development (1992), which focused attention on a previously little-studied stage of female development, the transition from girlhood to adolescence, and introduced the "Listener's Guide" as a research tool.[9] The book was named one of the New York Times Notable Books of the Year.[6] For her 2003 book, Girlfighting: Betrayal and rejection among girls, Brown interviewed more than 400 girls in grades 1 through 12 to explore the hypothesis that gossiping, backstabbing, and cliquishness stem from pressure to live up to society's idea of the perfect female.[10][11] She co-authored, with Sharon Lamb, a pair of books on the sexualization of teens in the media and marketing, Packaging Girlhood: Rescuing our daughters from marketers' schemes (2006) and Packaging Boyhood: Saving our sons from superheroes, slackers, and other media stereotypes (2009); her partner, Mark Tappan, was a co-author on the latter book.[12] Her most recent book, Powered By Girl: A Field Guide for Supporting Youth Activists (2016), is a playbook for adults who want to support girls' organizing.

She has co-authored seven curricula, including From Adversaries to Allies, currently in its third edition, which have been used in more than 100 girls' empowerment groups statewide and in 41 U.S. states.[13] She has also written many peer-reviewed articles, general media articles, and book chapters.[6]

Other activitiesEdit

Brown is a member of the National Women's Studies Association, the National Association for Media Literacy Education, and the Association for Women in Psychology.[6] She is a member of the board of Hardy Girls Healthy Women and the executive committee of the Waterville Inclusive Community Project. She is engaged in the trauma informed rural education redesign research-practice partnership known as Transforming Rural Experience in Education (TREE).[14] She has served as a member of the American Psychological Association Presidential Task Force on Adolescent Girls[15] and as a consultant to the Ms. Foundation for Women's National Girls' Initiative in 1994.[13] She has also been a consultant for numerous media and film projects.[6]

Awards and honorsEdit

In 2006 she was a co-winner, with Lauren Sterling, of the Groundbreaking Activist Leader Award from the Maine International Film Festival, for co-producing a documentary on the play Ugly Ducklings, which addresses homophobia and youth suicide.[16] She was named College Professor of the Year by the Academy of Education Arts and Sciences International in 2014.[17] She was inducted into the Maine Women's Hall of Fame in 2013.[13]

Personal lifeEdit

Brown and her partner, Mark Tappan, also a professor of education at Colby College,[12] have one daughter and reside in Waterville.[4] In 2012 their then-seventeen-year-old daughter Maya, a blogger for SPARK, was one of three girls interviewed by Katie Couric on the Katie show about their objections to the way the media portrays teen girls.[18]

Selected bibliographyEdit

BooksEdit

  • Powered by Girl: A field guide for working with youth activists. Beacon Press. 2016. ISBN 978-0807094600.
  • Packaging Boyhood: Saving our sons from superheroes, slackers, and other media stereotypes. Macmillan. 2009. ISBN 978-1429983259. (with Sharon Lamb and Mark Tappan)
  • Packaging Girlhood: Rescuing our daughters from marketers' schemes. Macmillan. 2006. ISBN 1429906324. (with Sharon Lamb)
  • Girlfighting: Betrayal and rejection among girls. NYU Press. 2003. ISBN 0814787061.
  • Raising Their Voices: The politics of girls' anger. Harvard University Press. 1999. ISBN 0674747216.
  • Meeting at the Crossroads: Women's psychology and girls' development. Harvard University Press. 1992. ISBN 0674564642. (with Carol Gilligan; reprinted 2013)

ArticlesEdit

ReferencesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ McCannell, Kelli. "Awards and Recognition". Retrieved 2020-01-23.
  2. ^ Brown 1999, p. 20.
  3. ^ a b "Diane Arlene Brown". Bangor Daily News. 16 June 2013. Retrieved 5 March 2016 – via HighBeam.[dead link]
  4. ^ a b "Lyn Mikel Brown". Colby College. Retrieved 5 March 2016.
  5. ^ a b c d e f "Lyn Mikel Brown (link to CV)". Colby College. Retrieved 5 March 2016.
  6. ^ "Lyn Mikel Brown". Hardy Girls Healthy Women. 2016. Archived from the original on 7 March 2016. Retrieved 5 March 2016.
  7. ^ Bridgers, Leslie (8 January 2012). "Mainer no friend of new Lego characters". Portland Press Herald. Retrieved 5 March 2016 – via HighBeam.[dead link]
  8. ^ Greene 2014, p. 63.
  9. ^ Ricks, Selena (19 January 2004). "Never easy, being a girl is harder than ever". Portland Press Herald. Retrieved 5 March 2016 – via HighBeam.[dead link]
  10. ^ "Competition: The fear that makes girls feud?". The Christian Science Monitor. 27 January 2004. Archived from the original on 19 November 2018. Retrieved 5 March 2016 – via HighBeam.
  11. ^ a b Routhier, Ray (8 November 2009). "Save the Males: Two Colby College professors collaborate on a new book about protecting boys from marketing that targets them". Portland Press Herald. Retrieved 5 March 2016 – via HighBeam.[dead link]
  12. ^ a b c "Maine Women's Hall of Fame Honorees – Lyn Mikel Brown". University of Maine at Augusta. 2016. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 5 March 2016.
  13. ^ "Lyn Mikel brown – Contributors". Colby College. 2018. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  14. ^ "A New Look at Adolescent Girls – Contributors". American Psychological Association. 2016. Retrieved 5 March 2016.
  15. ^ Calder, Amy (5 March 2006). "City theater owners among those honored". Portland Press Herald. Archived from the original on 30 April 2007. Retrieved 5 March 2016 – via HighBeam.
  16. ^ "Lyn Mikel Brown Receives Professor of the Year Award". Colby College. 22 October 2014. Retrieved 5 March 2016.
  17. ^ "Waterville teens to be interviewed by Katie Couric". Portland Press Herald. 7 August 2012. Retrieved 5 March 2016 – via HighBeam.[dead link]

SourcesEdit