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The Lone Star Flight Museum, located in Houston, Texas, is an aerospace museum that displays more than 24 historically significant aircraft,[4] and many artifacts related to the history of flight. The museum's collection is rare because most of the aircraft are flyable. Located at Ellington Airport, the museum is housed on about 100,000 ft2 (10,000 m2) of property, including its own airport ramp. The museum, formerly located in Galveston, moved to Houston to avoid a repeat of the devastation suffered during Hurricane Ike.

Lone Star Flight Museum
Lone Star Flight Museum at Ellington Field.jpg
New location of museum at Ellington Field
Lone Star Flight Museum is located in Texas
Lone Star Flight Museum
Location within Texas
LocationHouston, Texas
Coordinates29°36′14″N 95°10′30″W / 29.603833°N 95.175082°W / 29.603833; -95.175082
TypeAviation museum
FounderRobert L. Waltrip[1]
CEODouglas Owens[2]
CuratorStewart W. Bailey[3]
Websitelonestarflight.org
Lone Star Flight Museum, December 2008, after damage from Hurricane Ike. Pictured here is a North American F-100D Super Sabre.
The largest aircraft owned and operated by the museum is a Boeing B-17G, christened Thunderbird.

HistoryEdit

The museum began as a private collection of historic aircraft in 1985. By 1990, that collection had grown enough that its owner decided to place them on public display. The Lone Star Flight Museum, a non-profit organization funded entirely through private donations, was formed for that purpose.

2008 damage and restorationEdit

The museum reported heavy damage from Hurricane Ike, stating on September 16, 2008, that the hangars and Hall of Fame had received seven to eight feet of water and the lobby three to four. Damaged aircraft include a B-58A and F-100 on loan from the US Air Force Museum, Consolidated PBY-5A, Dehavilland DH-82A, Grumman F3F-2, Lockheed PV-2D, and Stinson L-5. Aircraft flown out of harm's way in advance include their B-17, B-25, DC-3, P-47, F6F, F4U, SBD, PT-17, T-6 and the F8F. Most of the airworthy planes were flown out of the museum prior to the hurricane. Those remaining as well as the static displays were largely destroyed or heavily damaged.[5] The B-58 went to Little Rock Air Force Base.[6] The PBY-5A went to the Pima Air & Space Museum.[7]

Move to HoustonEdit

Following the destruction of Hurricane Ike, the museum made the decision to move to Ellington International Airport in Houston. It is working with the Collings Foundation and Texas Flying Legends to create a combined aviation museum complex.[8] In March 2014, the museum received $7.6 million from FEMA.[9] The museum broke ground at its new location on November 9, 2015.[10] Initially scheduled to be dedicated on September 1, 2017, the opening was postponed to September 16th due to Hurricane Harvey.[11][12][13]

TF-51 crashEdit

On October 23, 2013 a P-51 (TF-51) Mustang owned by the museum crashed in Halls Lake, just south west of the museum. Both the pilot and a paying passenger from the UK were killed in the crash.[14]

AirshowsEdit

The museum's collection often participates in airshows across the country. As of 2005, the museum's aircraft annually log more than 40,000 miles (60,000 km) of cross-country flying to various air demonstrations.

The museum's P-47 Thunderbolt participates in USAF Heritage Flights throughout the year. The USAF Heritage Flight program was established in 1997 to commemorate the Air Force's 50th anniversary. It involves today's state-of-the-art fighters flying in close formation with World War II, Korean and Vietnam era fighters such as the P-51 Mustang and the F-86 Sabre. The flight's mission is to safely and proudly display the evolution of US Air Force airpower and to support the Air Force's recruiting and retention efforts.

The museum's North American B-25 Mitchell also serves closely with the Disabled American Veterans program. The DAV Airshow Outreach Program was developed to increase public awareness of disabled veterans and to serve veterans in communities across the nation. Using two B-25 medium bombers, the program reminds the public of the sacrifices veterans have made.

In 2007, the museum launched its newest program by offering rides in some of its warbirds. The LSFM now operates flights for passengers in the B-17 Flying Fortress, North American B-25 Mitchell, T-6 Texan and the PT-17 Stearman.

The Museum also has a flying Douglas DC-3 in the paint scheme of Continental Airlines. The Museum’s DC-3 was produced in 1940 and flew seven years for American Airlines. It was later bought by TransTexas Airways, which would later acquire Continental Airlines. When Gordon Bethune, CEO of Continental Airlines, was inducted into the TAHF in 2004, Continental Airlines donated the aircraft to the Flight Museum.[15]

Texas Aviation Hall of FameEdit

The Texas Aviation Hall of Fame, located within the museum, honors the contributions of residents or natives of Texas to aviation and spaceflight. Inductees include Howard Hughes, Gordon Bethune, Emma Carter Browning, Alan Bean, Senator Lloyd Bentsen, and President George H. W. Bush.[16]

CollectionEdit

 
P-38L Lightning
 
Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21
 
PBY Catalina

AirworthyEdit

On static display or in restorationEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Lips, Jesse (1 July 2006). "The Baton Passes at the Lone Star Flight Museum And Texas Aviation Hall of Fame". Airport Journals. Retrieved 10 December 2018.
  2. ^ "Douglas Owens". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  3. ^ "Stewart W. Bailey". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  4. ^ 24 historically significant aircraft
  5. ^ Lezon, Dale; Tolson, Mike (29 September 2008). "Ike damages Lone Star Flight Museum artifacts". Chron. Hearst Newspapers, LLC. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  6. ^ Weeks, John A. "TB-58 Hustler". John A. Weeks III. Retrieved 25 March 2019.
  7. ^ "Pima Adds a Catalina… and a Privateer!". Warbird Digest. 23 August 2015. Retrieved 25 March 2019.
  8. ^ Rice, Harvey (20 August 2011). "Lone Star Flight museum moving inland to Ellington". Chron. Hearst Newspapers, LLC. Retrieved 17 August 2017.
  9. ^ Mitelman, Josh (24 March 2014). "Lone Star Flight Museum to get $7.6 million from FEMA for relocation". Houston Business Journal. American City Business Journals. Retrieved 27 August 2017.
  10. ^ Furr, Laura (6 November 2015). "Lone Star Flight Museum to break ground on new facility". Houston Business Journal. American City Business Journals. Retrieved 27 August 2017.
  11. ^ Para, Jen (23 August 2017). "Lone Star Flight Museum to open over Labor Day weekend". Houston Business Journal. American City Business Journals. Retrieved 27 August 2017.
  12. ^ Para, Jen (29 August 2017). "Lone Star Flight Museum experiences no damage, opening postponed". Houston Journal. American City Business Journals. Retrieved 4 September 2017.
  13. ^ Owens, Douglas H. (1 September 2017). "Museum Opening Rescheduled for 9/16". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 4 September 2017.
  14. ^ Paschenko, Chris (23 October 2013). "Denton pilot, UK passenger killed when vintage fighter crashed". The Daily News. Galveston Newspapers, Inc. Retrieved 17 August 2017.
  15. ^ https://www.lonestarflight.org/aircraft/douglas-dc-3
  16. ^ Lone Star home of the Texas Aviation Hall of Fame Archived 2014-11-05 at the Wayback Machine
  17. ^ "Cobra Gunship TAH-1P". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  18. ^ "FAA REGISTRY [N599HF]". Federal Aviation Administration. U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  19. ^ "Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  20. ^ "FAA REGISTRY [N900RW]". Federal Aviation Administration. U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  21. ^ a b "Boeing PT-17 Stearman". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  22. ^ "FAA REGISTRY [N84LK]". Federal Aviation Administration. U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  23. ^ "FAA REGISTRY [N75272]". Federal Aviation Administration. U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  24. ^ "T-41 Mescalero". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  25. ^ "FAA REGISTRY [N15138]". Federal Aviation Administration. U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  26. ^ "Douglas A-1D Skyraider". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  27. ^ "FAA REGISTRY [N91945]". Federal Aviation Administration. U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  28. ^ "Douglas DC-3". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  29. ^ "FAA REGISTRY [N25673]". Federal Aviation Administration. U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  30. ^ "Douglas SBD Dauntless". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  31. ^ "FAA REGISTRY [N93RW]". Federal Aviation Administration. U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  32. ^ "Fairchild PT-19 Cornell". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  33. ^ "FAA REGISTRY [N1941N]". Federal Aviation Administration. U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  34. ^ "General Motors TBM Avenger". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  35. ^ "Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  36. ^ "Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  37. ^ "North American B-25 Mitchell". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  38. ^ "FAA REGISTRY [N333RW]". Federal Aviation Administration. U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  39. ^ "North American T-6 Texan". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  40. ^ "FAA REGISTRY [N566TX]". Federal Aviation Administration. U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  41. ^ "Piper L-4 Grasshopper". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  42. ^ "Republic P-47 Thunderbolt". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  43. ^ "FAA REGISTRY [N4747P]". Federal Aviation Administration. U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  44. ^ "Stinson L-5 Sentinel". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  45. ^ "FAA REGISTRY [N68MH]". Federal Aviation Administration. U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  46. ^ "Chance Vought F4U-5N Corsair". Lone Star Flight Museum. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  47. ^ "FAA REGISTRY [N43RW]". Federal Aviation Administration. U.S. Department of Transportation. Retrieved 18 August 2017.

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