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The Fisheries Convention or the London Fisheries Convention is an international agreement signed in London in relation to fishing rights across the coastal waters of Western Europe, in particular the fishing rights in the North Sea, in the Skagerrak, in the Kattegat and on the European Atlantic coast. It gives right of full access to the fishing grounds between 6 and 12 nautical miles of the national coastline to the fishing industry of those contracting parties that had already been fishing there in the period 1953–1962.

Fisheries Convention
London Fisheries Convention
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  Parties (coastline involved)
  Parties (coastline not involved)
  Signatory (landlocked, no coastline)
Signed9 March 1964; 55 years ago (9 March 1964)[1]
LocationLondon, United Kingdom[1]
Effective15 March 1966; 53 years ago (15 March 1966)[1]
Condition8 ratifications
Signatories12[1]
Parties12[1]
DepositaryGovernment of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland[2]
LanguagesEnglish and French

This agreement is largely superseded to the Common Fisheries Policy (the CFP), as all parties are members of the European Union.

Contents

Background and negotiationsEdit

Between Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Netherlands, United Kingdom the "International Convention for regulating the police of the North Sea fisheries outside territorial waters" (the North Sea Fisheries Convention) of 1888 applied which allowed fishing in each other's waters up to 3 miles from the coast line. The United Kingdom denounced this convention in 1963 in order to allow setting up a 12-mile exclusive fishery zone. After denunciation it invited the parties to that convention and several others to negotiate on several issues related to fisheries, which resulted in the Fisheries Convention.[3]

Negotiations took place between the parties of the European Economic Communities, the European Free Trade Association, the Commission of the EEC, as well as Iceland, Ireland and Norway.[3]

PartiesEdit

The convention has 12 parties,[1] while 1 signatory (Luxembourg) signed but did not ratify. Poland is a non-signatory which acceded to the convention after its entry into force.

The UK denounced the convention on 3 July 2017,[1][4] effective 2 years later or (if that is on a later date) upon Brexit.[2][5]

Party Ratification/
Accession
Entry into force Superseded Denunciation/
Withdrawal
Territorial scope
  Belgium 10 February 1966 15 March 1966 21 September 1970
25 January 1983
all coasts
  Kingdom of Denmark 9 October 1964 15 March 1966 1 January 1973
25 January 1983
1 January 1983 (Faroe Islands[citation needed]
1 January 1985 (Greenland)[citation needed]
coasts in the North Sea, in the Skagerrak and in the Kattegat
  France 5 July 1965 15 March 1966 21 September 1970
25 January 1983
The North Sea, the English Channel and the European Atlantic coasts
  Germany
(originally as West Germany,
including Land Berlin)
19 January 1970 19 January 1970 21 September 1970
25 January 1983
The North sea coast
  Ireland 20 September 1965 15 March 1966 1 January 1973
25 January 1983
all coasts
  Italy 25 March 1966 25 March 1966 21 September 1970
25 January 1983
  Luxembourg not ratified 21 September 1970
25 January 1983
  Netherlands 20 July 1971 20 July 1971 21 September 1970
25 January 1983
The North Sea coast
  Poland 7 June 1966 7 June 1966 21 September 1970
1 January 1973
25 January 1983
1 January 1986
1 January 1995
1 May 2004
  Portugal 15 September 1965 15 March 1966 21 September 1970
1 January 1973
25 January 1983
1 January 1986
coasts north of the 36th parallel and the coasts of Madeira
  Spain 10 February 1966 15 March 1966 21 September 1970
1 January 1973
25 January 1983
1 January 1986
coasts north of the 36th parallel
  Sweden 16 February 1966 15 March 1966 25 January 1983
1 January 1995
west coast, north of a line drawn from The Kullen (sv) to Gilbjerg Head (sv)
  United Kingdom 11 September 1964 15 March 1966 1 January 1973
25 January 1983
3 July 2017,[5] effective 2019 or upon Brexit[5] All coasts, including those of the   Isle of Man and of the Channel Islands (  Jersey and   Guernsey [including   Alderney and   Sark])

Denunciation and withdrawalEdit

The convention can be denounced from 20 years of its entry into force after a two years' notice.[6][2] On 2 July 2017 the United Kingdom announced that the Government would give formal notice on the next day (3 July 2017) to denounce and withdraw from, which it did on 3 July 2017[1] effective 2 years later or upon Brexit.[7] which might have an effect on non-British fishing fleet that have used part of the 6–12 nautical-mile-zone of the UK (and also of the Isle Man and the Channel Islands) under the convention.[8]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Fisheries Convention". Treaty Database of the Government of the Netherlands. Retrieved 2 July 2017.
  2. ^ a b c "Fisheries Convention". Government of the Netherlands. Retrieved 2 July 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Memorie van Toelichting". National Library of the Netherlands (in Dutch). 30 August 1968. Retrieved 2 July 2017.
  4. ^ "Fisheries Convention". UK Treaties database. Retrieved 15 July 2017.
  5. ^ a b c "Status List" (PDF). Gov.uk. Retrieved 15 July 2017.
  6. ^ "UK leaves fishing convention amid Brexit talks". EU Observer. 3 July 2017. Retrieved 5 July 2017.
  7. ^ Perraudin, Frances (2 July 2017). "UK to 'take back control' of waters after exiting fishing convention" – via The Guardian.
  8. ^ "UK to withdraw from international fishing arrangement". BBC News. 2 July 2017. Retrieved 2 July 2017.

External linksEdit