Lolo Fakaosilea (born 10 June 1995) is an Australian rugby union player. He currently plays as a flanker for Kintetsu Liners in the Top Challenge League in Japan.

Lolo Fakaosilea
Birth nameLolo Fakaosilea
Date of birth (1995-06-10) 10 June 1995 (age 24)
Place of birthAuckland, New Zealand
Height190 cm (6 ft 3 in)
Weight111 kg (17 st 7 lb)
SchoolSt Patrick's, Shorncliffe
Brisbane Boys College
Marist College Emerald
Notable relative(s)Jonah Lomu, Seiana Fakaosilea
Occupation(s)Professional Rugby Player
Rugby union career
Position(s) Number 8, Flanker
Current team ACT Brumbies
Senior career
Years Team Apps (Points)
2014–16 Queensland Country 4 (0)
Correct as of 1 November 2014
Super Rugby
Years Team Apps (Points)
2015–16
2017–2018
Reds
Brumbies
8
28
(0)
(0)
Correct as of 18 March 2017
National team(s)
Years Team Apps (Points)
2012–13
2014–15
Australian Schoolboys
Australia U20
9
4
(25)

Family and early lifeEdit

Lolo Fakaosilea was born in Auckland, New Zealand but moved to Brisbane, Queensland with his family as a young boy. His father Seiana Fakaosilea had played for the Auckland Blues and also represented the inaugural New Zealand Tongan first XV that played trial matches against the Pacific Islanders.[citation needed]

Fakaosilea started his rugby at the age of five, playing for the Sunnybank Rugby junior club until he was twelve. He then moved to Emerald where he attended Marist College from 2009 to 2011. While playing rugby for Marist College he was selected in the Central Queensland Bushrangers team to play in the Queensland Junior State Championships. He returned to Brisbane for his senior high school years at Brisbane Boys College and St Patrick's College, Shorncliffe.[1] Fakaosilea was selected for the Australian Schoolboys rugby team in 2012 and 2013.[1][2]

Fakaosilea is also a nephew of the former All Black rugby star Jonah Lomu, and he is briefly mentioned in Lomu's autobiography.[3]

CareerEdit

Fakaosilea played premier grade rugby for the Sunnybank club. He was selected for the Australian Men's Youth Sevens team to play at the Youth Olympic Festival held at Sydney in 2013,[4] before signing a one-year contract for the 2014 season,[5] and then later on signing a further two-year contract with the Queensland Reds for the 2015 and 2016 seasons.[citation needed]

In 2014, he played for the Reds A team in the Pacific Rugby Cup, and was selected for the Australia U20 team to play at the 2014 IRB Junior World Championship held in New Zealand.[2] Later that year Fakaosilea was named in the Queensland Country squad for the National Rugby Championship, but was sadly side lined, after sustaining a torn meniscus which resulted in needing surgery.[6]

Fakaosilea made his Super Rugby debut for the Reds during the 2015 Super Rugby season, coming off the bench against the Hurricanes at Lang Park.[7] He was selected again for the Australian Under 20 team in 2015.[8]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Australian Schoolboys by School" (PDF). schoolsrugby.com.au. Retrieved 13 February 2019.
  2. ^ a b "Lolo Fakaosilea". Australian Rugby. 2014. Archived from the original on 21 August 2014. Retrieved 3 May 2015.
  3. ^ Lomu, Jonah (2004). My Story. New Zealand: Hodder Moa Beckett. ISBN 978-1-86971-294-5.
  4. ^ Heslehurst, Brayden (16 January 2013). "Sunnybank Dragon's Lolo Fakaosilea to represent Australia in rugby sevens at the Youth Olympic Festival". The Courier Mail. News. Archived from the original on 22 September 2013. Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  5. ^ Yelland, Rebekah (20 September 2013). "Emerald union star accepts Qld Reds contract". Central Queensland News. APN Group. Archived from the original on 22 September 2013. Retrieved 2 May 2015.
  6. ^ Tooma, Carla (29 August 2014). "Bond University Queensland Country team named for first Buildcorp NRC clash". My Gold Coast. Archived from the original on 3 May 2015. Retrieved 3 May 2015.
  7. ^ "Queensland Reds v Hurricanes at Brisbane". ESPN Scrum. 26 April 2015. Retrieved 3 May 2015.
  8. ^ Grant, Lee (2 May 2015). "Australian Under 20s beat Samoa". Green and Gold Rugby. Archived from the original on 3 May 2015. Retrieved 3 May 2015.

External linksEdit