Lola Cuddy

Lola L. Cuddy (born 1939) is a Canadian psychologist recognized for her contributions to the field of music psychology. She is a professor emerita in the Department of Psychology at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario.

Lola L. Cuddy
Born1939 (age 80–81)
NationalityCanadian
Academic background
Alma materUniversity of Winnipeg
University of Toronto
Doctoral advisorEndel Tulving
Academic work
DisciplinePsychology
Sub-disciplineMusic psychology
InstitutionsQueen's University

BiographyEdit

Cuddy was born in 1939 and grew up in a musical family in Winnipeg, Manitoba.[1] A trained pianist, she completed an undergraduate degree in psychology at United College (now the University of Winnipeg) in 1959, while also earning a diploma in music.[1][2] She earned a master's degree (1961) and a PhD (1965) in psychology from the University of Toronto, under the supervision of Endel Tulving.[1][2][3] In 1965, Cuddy and her husband, Mel Wiebe (a scholar of Victorian literature), left Toronto to accept positions at Queen's University.[1][4]

In 1969, Cuddy established the Music Cognition Lab at Queen's University, the first music psychology laboratory in Canada[5] and one of the first in the world.[6] Her research program has examined a wide range of topics within music psychology,[7] including melodic expectation,[8] absolute pitch,[9] and effects of musical training.[10] A recent line of research explored music processing among individuals with Alzheimer's disease.[7][11][12] This work garnered media attention for the finding that patients with memory loss associated with dementia may be able to maintain musical memories.[13][6][14][15]

Cuddy served as editor of the journal Music Perception from 2002 to 2017, and as a consulting editor to the journals Musicae Scientiae and Psychomusicology.[1][7][3] She was the president of the Society for Music Perception and Cognition from 2001 to 2002.[7]

Honours and awardsEdit

Selected worksEdit

  • Cuddy, Lola L.; Cohen, Annabel J.; Miller, Janet (1979). "Melody recognition: The experimental application of musical rules". Canadian Journal of Psychology. 33 (3): 148–157. doi:10.1037/h0081713. PMID 519545.
  • Cuddy, Lola L.; Cohen, Annabel J.; Mewhort, D. J. K. (1981). "Perception of structure in short melodic sequences". Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance. 7 (4): 869–883. doi:10.1037/0096-1523.7.4.869.
  • Cuddy, Lola L.; Badertscher, Betsy (1987). "Recovery of the tonal hierarchy: Some comparisons across age and levels of musical experience". Perception & Psychophysics. 41 (6): 609–620. doi:10.3758/BF03210493. PMID 3615155.
  • Cuddy, Lola L.; Lunney, Carole A. (1995). "Expectancies generated by melodic intervals: Perceptual judgments of melodic continuity". Perception & Psychophysics. 57 (4): 451–462. doi:10.3758/BF03213071. PMID 7596743.
  • Jakobson, Lorna S.; Cuddy, Lola L.; Kilgour, Andrea R. (2003). "Time Tagging: A Key to Musicians' Superior Memory". Music Perception. 20 (3): 307–313. doi:10.1525/mp.2003.20.3.307.
  • "Memory for Melodies and Lyrics in Alzheimer's Disease". Music Perception: An Interdisciplinary Journal. 29 (5): 479–491. 2012. doi:10.1525/mp.2012.29.5.479.
  • Cuddy, Lola L.; Duffin, Jacalyn (2005). "Music, memory, and Alzheimer's disease: Is music recognition spared in dementia, and how can it be assessed?". Medical Hypotheses. 64 (2): 229–235. doi:10.1016/j.mehy.2004.09.005. PMID 15607545.
  • Cuddy, Lola L. (2018). "Long-Term Memory for Music". Springer Handbook of Systematic Musicology. Springer Handbooks. pp. 453–459. doi:10.1007/978-3-662-55004-5_23. ISBN 978-3-662-55002-1.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e Cuddy, Lola L. (2009). "Development of music perception and cognition research: An autobiographical account from a Canadian perspective". Psychomusicology: Music, Mind and Brain. 20 (1–2): 43–52. doi:10.1037/h0094225. ISSN 2162-1535.
  2. ^ a b "Dr. Lola Cuddy | Education with Impact - 2 | The University of Winnipeg". University of Winnipeg. Retrieved 2019-12-18.
  3. ^ a b c d "Lola Cuddy CV" (PDF). Queen's University. 2017-06-01. Retrieved 2019-12-16.
  4. ^ Jansman, Anita (2013-09-20). "Psychology professor a pioneer in music perception and cognition". Queen's Gazette | Queen's University. Retrieved 2019-12-18.
  5. ^ "How music affects the brain". University Affairs. Retrieved 2019-12-18.
  6. ^ a b Elliott, Trisha (2019-02-15). "For those with dementia, music brings comfort, connection and joy". The UC Observer. Retrieved 2019-12-18.
  7. ^ a b c d e "SMPC honors MP Editor Lola Cuddy with Lifetime Achievement Award | Music Perception". Music Perception. Retrieved 2019-12-18.
  8. ^ Cuddy, Lola L.; Lunney, Carole A. (1995). "Expectancies generated by melodic intervals: Perceptual judgments of melodic continuity". Perception & Psychophysics. 57 (4): 451–462. doi:10.3758/BF03213071. ISSN 0031-5117. PMID 7596743.
  9. ^ Cuddy, Lola L. (1968). "Practice Effects in the Absolute Judgment of Pitch". The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 43 (5): 1069–1076. Bibcode:1968ASAJ...43.1069C. doi:10.1121/1.1910941. ISSN 0001-4966. PMID 5648097.
  10. ^ Jakobson, Lorna S.; Cuddy, Lola L.; Kilgour, Andrea R. (2003). "Time Tagging: A Key to Musicians' Superior Memory". Music Perception. 20 (3): 307–313. doi:10.1525/mp.2003.20.3.307. ISSN 0730-7829.
  11. ^ "Memory for Melodies and Lyrics in Alzheimer's Disease". Music Perception: An Interdisciplinary Journal. 29 (5): 479–491. 2012. doi:10.1525/mp.2012.29.5.479.
  12. ^ Cuddy, Lola L.; Sikka, Ritu; Vanstone, Ashley (2015). "Preservation of musical memory and engagement in healthy aging and Alzheimer's disease: Musical memory in Alzheimer's disease". Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 1337 (1): 223–231. doi:10.1111/nyas.12617. PMID 25773638.
  13. ^ Cuddy, Lola L.; Duffin, Jacalyn (2005). "Music, memory, and Alzheimer's disease: is music recognition spared in dementia, and how can it be assessed?". Medical Hypotheses. 64 (2): 229–235. doi:10.1016/j.mehy.2004.09.005. PMID 15607545.
  14. ^ a b "The Alzheimer patient who sang 'Oh, what a beautiful morning!'". www.elsevier.com. Retrieved 2019-12-23.
  15. ^ Glauberzon, Olivia (2009-02-25). "More to music than catchy tunes". Investment Executive. Retrieved 2019-12-18.
  16. ^ "APS Fellows". Association for Psychological Science. Retrieved 2019-12-21.