Little Pattie

Patricia "Little Pattie" Thelma Thompson (née Amphlett) OAM (born 17 March 1949) is an Australian singer who started her career as a teenager in the early 1960s, recording surf pop, with her backing group The Statesmen, she subsequently went onto to record adult contemporary music.[1][2][3]

Little Pattie
Birth namePatricia Thelma Amphlett
Born (1949-03-17) 17 March 1949 (age 73)
Paddington, Sydney, Australia
OriginSydney, Australia
Genres
Occupation(s)Singer
Instrument(s)vocals, piano
Years active1962–present
Labels

Billed as Little Pattie, she released her debut single in November 1963, "He's My Blonde Headed, Stompie Wompie, Real Gone Surfer Boy"[1][3] which peaked at No. 19 on the national Kent Music Report and entered No. 2 in Sydney.[4]

She appeared regularly on television variety programs, including Bandstand, and toured as a support act for Col Joye and the Joy Boys.[1][3] Little Pattie was entertaining troops during the Vietnam War in Nui Dat, Vietnam, as an Australia Forces Sweetheart (in the vein of Lorrae Desmond, Dinah Lee and others), when the nearby Battle of Long Tan began on 18 August 1966.[1][2][3]

In 1994 she received the Vietnam Logistic and Support Medal "in recognition of her services in support of the Australian Armed Forces in operations in Vietnam."[5]

BeginningsEdit

Patricia Thelma Amphlett was born in March 1949 in Paddington, New South Wales, and has an older brother, Joe.[2] She is the cousin of the late Chrissy Amphlett, frontwoman of Australian band Divinyls.[2][6] She was educated at King Street Primary School[2] and Sydney Girls High School.[1][7] She was nicknamed "Little Pattie" at school as she had two taller friends also named Patricia.[2]

At eight years old, she commenced piano lessons with Gwen Parsons, and then singing lessons when 11 years old.[8] Parsons also taught Noeleen Batley, a popular singer called "Australia's Little Miss Sweetheart".[1][9] Both persuaded her to audition for the Nine Network TV teen variety show Saturday Date, where she was a hit.[9] She first appeared on TV, singing on the Opportunity Knocks series, when she was 13. While a third-year high school student, at the age of 14, she performed weekly at the Bronte Surf Club as lead singer of the Statesmen with Nev Jade, Peter Maxworthy, Duncan McGuire (on bass guitar), Mark Rigby and Peter Walker.[9] Singer-songwriter Jay Justin was impressed with her vocals and recommended her for a recording contract with EMI.[1]

Teenage singing starEdit

Little Pattie's debut single was the double A-sided "He's My Blonde Headed, Stompie Wompie, Real Gone Surfer Boy" / "Stompin' at Maroubra", both co-written by Jay Justin and record producer Joe Halford,[9][10][11][6] which used the surf music style and a dance style craze that was known as 'The Stomp'.[1] It was released by EMI on HMV in November 1963 when she was aged 14, and reached No. 2 on the Sydney music charts (#1 was the Beatles' "I Want to Hold Your Hand"),[1] No. 6 in Brisbane,[6] and peaked at No. 19 on the national Kent Music Report.[4] Little Pattie left school in early 1964,[9] and released her debut album, The Many Moods of Little Pattie on EMI / HMV.[1] She had further hits on the Sydney charts with "We're Gonna Have a Party Tonight" (#18 in March),[1] "Pushin' a Good Thing Too Far" (#28 in March 1965)[1][12] and "Dance Puppet Dance" (#9 in October).[1]

Her popularity saw her voted as Australian Female Singer of the Year in 1965.[9] She appeared frequently on television variety programs, including Bandstand, Saturday Date, An Evening With and Sing, Sing, Sing.[1]

Little Pattie regularly toured supporting Col Joye & the Joy Boys, with Judy Stone, Cathy Wayne and international star Sandie Shaw.[1] The Joy Boys included Joye's brothers Kevin Jacobsen on piano and Keith Jacobsen on bass guitar.[13]

On 16 August 1966, 17 years old and 147 cm (4 ft 10 in) tall, Little Pattie became the youngest and shortest person to entertain troops during the Vietnam War.[3] Along with Col Joye & the Joy Boys she performed three concerts each day[14] in Nui Dat. She was singing onstage backed by the Joy Boys when the Battle of Long Tan started on 18 August less than 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) away.[2][3][14] Although organisers had promised her safety, she was evacuated from the area before the completion of her scheduled performances.[3]

During the third show I was given the sign, which of course is the fingers across the throat, which in show business means you better finish. We were very swiftly evacuated by Iroquois helicopters. We could see the jungle where the battle was well and truly taking place and I remember that instinctive... that feeling of – this is very bad; this is dangerous. This is going to be a sad night, and indeed it was. You know, 17-year-old thoughts and through 17-year-old eyes, I guess, but I could see thousands and thousands of orange lights, which of course was the gunfire, and I'll never forget it. Never.[15]

— Patricia Amphlett, 17 August 2009, Radio Australia Today

In the days after the battle, Joye and Little Pattie visited injured soldiers in hospital to comfort and sing to them.[2][5] In 1994 she received the Vietnam Logistic and Support Medal in recognition of her services in support of the Australian Armed Forces in operations in Vietnam.[5] From 1966, Little Pattie was performing solo in cabarets and clubs, she continued releasing singles and albums with EMI until 1970, and then signed with Joye's ATA recording label and management group.[1] She subsequently appeared on several TV shows in America, including The Ed Sullivan Show.[9][14]

Later careerEdit

As Little Pattie entered her twenties, she continued her career moving into adult contemporary music. During the 1972 Australian Federal election campaign she sang with other entertainers including Joye and Judy Stone in the Australian Labor Party's "It's Time" TV commercial, which featured future Prime Minister, Gough Whitlam.[2] Styled as Pattie Amphlett from 1972, she released singles and albums on ATA / Festival Records and by 1977 had moved into country music.[1] In 1973, she married Keith Jacobsen (Joy Boys' bass guitarist, ATA record producer and manager) and continued to perform on television and in clubs.[2] Amphlett parted from Keith in 1984 and married Lawrie Thompson (a drummer) in 1986.[2]

Her repertoire included swing tunes from Gershwin, Rodgers and Hart, and Cole Porter.[14] In 1990, she toured China as vocalist for veteran jazz musician Graeme Bell and his Allstars.[14] As Patricia Thompson, she became an active unionist in the entertainment industry,[2] and a vocal teacher, later coaching Nikki Webster before her performance at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney.[2] She has taught at a number of Sydney high schools: Burwood Girls High School, St. Joseph's College, Hunters Hill, Mercy College, Chatswood and Saint Ignatius' College, Riverview.[8]

In 2001 EMI re-released a compilation album, 20 Stompy Wompy Hits, which featured her early songs. The ABC-TV series Long Way to the Top was broadcast in August 2001.[16] Little Pattie featured on Episode 1, "Bed of a Thousand Struggles 1956–1964", where she discussed her early surf music and 'The Stomp' dance craze.[17] The TV series inspired the Long Way to the Top national concert tour during August–September 2002, which featured a host of the best Australian acts of the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s including Little Pattie and Col Joye and the Joy Boys.[2][9][18][19] In 2004, General Peter Cosgrove invited her to be patron of FACE (Forces Advisory Council on Entertainment) and she was invited to go to Iraq to perform for Christmas 2005 and New Year 2006. She performed at the "Salute to Vietnam Veterans" held at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra on 19 August 2006.[2]

In addition to her music career, Little Pattie was a member of the Council for the Australian War Memorial from 1995 until 1998, and received an Order of Australia Medal in 2003 for her services (as national President) to the Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance and (as vice-president) to Actors' Equity.[20] She has been on the Federal Executive of the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU). In 2000 The Sydney Morning Herald included her on a list of the 'century's most loved faces', and she was included in a 1998 issue of Australian stamps featuring pop and rock acts.[3]

On 27 August 2009, Little Pattie was inducted into the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) Hall of Fame alongside Kev Carmody, The Dingoes, Mental As Anything and John Paul Young.[21][22][23] She was inducted by her cousin, Christina Amphlett of Divinyls, with former Australian Idol star, Lisa Mitchell performing "He's My Blonde-Headed, Stompie Wompie, Real Gone Surfer Boy".[24]

She is currently a singing teacher at various high schools in Sydney, including St Joseph's College and Burwood Girls High School.

Personal lifeEdit

In 1973, Little Pattie married Joy Boys' bass guitarist and ATA record producer and manager Keith Jacobsen,[1][2] brother of Colin (Col Joye) and Kevin Jacobsen.[2] Keith and Little Pattie parted in 1984 and she subsequently married Lawrie Thompson in 1986.[2]

National honoursEdit

Little Pattie received a Medal of the Order of Australia on 9 June 2003 for her services to the Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance (as National President) and to Actors Equity (as vice-president).[20] On 27 August 2009, Little Pattie was inducted into the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) Hall of Fame alongside Kev Carmody, The Dingoes, Mental As Anything and John Paul Young.[21][22][23]

DiscographyEdit

Releases by Little Pattie unless otherwise indicated:[1][25][26]

AlbumsEdit

List of albums, with Australian chart positions
Title Album details Peak chart
positions
AUS
[27]
The Many Moods of Little Pattie
  • Released: 1964
  • Format: LP
  • Label: His Master's Voice (OCLP-7621)
Pattie
  • Released: 1965
  • Format: LP
  • Label: His Master's Voice (OCLP-7651)
Little Things Like This
  • Released: 1965
  • Format: LP
  • Label: His Master's Voice (OCLP-7666)
The Best of Little Pattie
I Will Bring You Flowers (as Pattie Amphlett)
  • Released: 1972
  • Format: LP
  • Label: Ata Records (SATAL-934579)
-
Sunshine of My Life (as Pattie Amphlett) -
Only if You Want to (as Pattie Amphlett) -
A Little Bit of Country (as Pattie Amphlett with Col Joye)
  • Released: 1978
  • Format: LP
  • Label: Pisces Records (L 27031)
86
20 Stompie Wompie Hits!
  • Released: 1980
  • Format: LP, Cassette
  • Label: EMI Music (EMY.504)
  • Compilation album
-

Extended playsEdit

Title Details
Little Pattie
  • Released: 1964
  • Format: 7" EP
  • Label: His Master's Voice (7EGO 70044)
Pushin' a Good Thing Too Far
  • Released: 1965
  • Format: 7" EP
  • Label: His Master's Voice (7EGO 70050)
Dance Puppet Dance
  • Released: 1965
  • Format: 7" EP
  • Label: His Master's Voice (7EGO 70057)
I'll Eat My Hat
  • Released: 1967
  • Format: 7" EP
  • Label: His Master's Voice (7EGO 70077)

SinglesEdit

Year Title Peak chart positions Album
Go-Set
[28]
KMR
[4]
1963 "He's My Blonde-Headed, Stompie Wompie, Real Gone Surfer Boy" /
"Stomping at Maroubra" (by Little Pattie & the Statesmen)[A]
19 Little Pattie
1964 "We're Gonna Have a Party Tonight" (by Little Pattie & the Statesmen) 41 The Many Moods of Little Pattie
"He's My Boy" 71
"Surfin' Time Again" 91
1965 "Pushin' a Good Thing Too Far" 34 Pushin' a Good Thing Too Far EP'
"Dance Puppet Dance" 29 Dance Puppet Dance EP'
"My Love" Little Things Like This
"Game of Love"
1966 "Never Gonna Love Again" Non-album single
"Don't Walk Away"
"Let Me Dream" 81
"With Love from Jenny" (by Bryan Davies & Little Pattie) 88
1967 "I'll Eat My Hat" 38[29] 45 I'll Eat My Hat
"If He Would Care" Non-album single
"I Knew Right Away"
"Let Me Down Lightly[30]"
1968 "Sunshine Boy"
"Love Is a Happy Thing" (by Grantley Dee & Little Pattie) 53
1969 "Gravitation" 67 Beautiful in the Rain
"Someone Out There"
"—" denotes releases that did not chart or were not released in that country.
Year Title Peak chart positions Album
Go-Set
[28]
KMR
[4][31]
1969 "The Penthouse" Beautiful in the Rain
1971 "April Fool" Non-album single
1972 "Save Me" (by Pattie Amphlett) I Will Bring You Flowers
"Carolina" (by Pattie Amphlett)
1973 "What's Your Mama's Name" (by Pattie Amphlett) Non-album single
1974 "Kentucky Blues" (by Pattie Amphlett) Sunshine of Your Life
1976 "Only If You Want To" (by Pattie Amphlett) 61 Only If You Want To
1977 "You'll Never Know" (by Pattie Amphlett)
"What Am I Gonna Do?" (by Pattie Amphlett)
1980 "Ain't Nothing Gonna Keep Me from You" Non-album single
"—" denotes releases that did not chart or were not released in that country.

Charity singlesEdit

List of charity singles
Title Year Peak chart positions Notes
AUS
[32]
"I Touch Myself" (as part of the I Touch Myself Project) 2014 72 The I Touch Myself Project launched in 2014 with a mission to encourage young women to touch themselves regularly to find early signs of cancer.[33]

FILM

  • Natural Causes (1985)
  • Breaking Loose: Summer City II (1988)
  • The Sharp End (1992) (Film documentary)

TELEVISION

  • Opportunity Knocks (1963)
  • Sing, Sing, Sing (1963-1965)
  • Ampol Stamp Quiz (1964)
  • Teen Scene (1964)
  • Saturday Date (1965)
  • Bandstand (1965-1968)
  • The Go!! Show (1966-1967)
  • An Evening With (1966)
  • The 10th Annual TV Week Logie Awards (1968) (TV special)
  • Sounds Like Us (1970)
  • The Ed Sullivan Show (1970) (US)
  • 25 Years Of Channel Nine (1971) (TV special) (archival clips)
  • Carry On Spike In Australia (1972) (TV special)
  • The Bert Newton Show (1973)
  • Matt Flinders And Friends (1973)
  • The Graham Kennedy Show (1973;1975)
  • The Ernie Sigley Show (1974-1975)
  • The Norman Gunston Show (1975)
  • Countdown (1976;1977;1981)
  • Bandstand '76 (1976)
  • The Celebrity Game (1977)
  • This Is Your Life? Johnny O'Keefe (1977)
  • The 1978 Australian Song Festival (1978) (TV special)
  • Festival Of Carols (1978) (TV special)
  • This Fabulous Century (1979)
  • Young Talent Time (1979) (Herself)
  • Countdown (1981)
  • Australian Music Stars Of The 60s (1982) (TV special) (archival clips)
  • The Daryl Somers Show (1982)
  • Countdown Music & Video Awards 1983 (1984) (ABC TV special)
  • Television: The First 30 Years (1986) (TV special)
  • Have A Go (1987)
  • The N.S.W. Royal Bicentennial Concert (1988) (TV special)
  • Good Morning Australia (1988)
  • The Bert Newton Show (1988;1989)
  • 35 Years Of Australian Television (1991) (TV special) (archival clips)
  • Good Morning Australia (1994-2003)
  • Fifty Fantastic Years (1995) (TV special)
  • Our Century (1996)
  • When Rock Was Young: The 60s (1998) (TV special)
  • Barry Humphries' Flashbacks (1999) (archival clips)
  • Laws (1999)
  • This Fabulous Century: The Heroes (1999) (TV special)
  • Long Way To The Top (2001)
  • Long Way To The Top: Live In Concert (2002) (ABC TV special)
  • Love Is In The Air (2003)
  • Billy Thorpe Memorial Service (2007) (TV special)
  • ABC News (2007)
  • Talking Heads (2007)
  • Bert's Family Fued (2007)
  • Today (2008,2012)
  • Mornings With Kerri-Anne (2008)
  • Aria Hall Of Fame 2009 (2009) (TV special)
  • Spicks & Specks (2010)
  • Anzac Day March (2011- )
  • The Morning Show (2012)
  • Today Extra (2012)
  • Sunrise (2012)
  • ABC News Breakfast (2012)
  • Long Way To The Top 10th Anniversary Special (2012) (TV special)
  • The Time Of My Life (2013)
  • News Breakfast (2016;2021)
  • Australian Story (2016)
  • Men Of Wood And Foam (2017) (Foxtel TV Special)
  • News Breakfast (2020)
  • Nine Late News (2021)
  • Australian Women In Music Awards (2022) (ABC2 TV special)

NotesEdit

A.^ "He's My Blonde-Headed, Stompie Wompie, Real Gone Surfer Boy" / "Stompin' at Marourbra" was originally released as a double A-sided single by Little Pattie & the Statesmen in November 1963. Both tracks appeared on the EP, He's My Blonde Headed Real Gone Stompie Wompie Surfer Boy in December and subsequently appeared on the album, The Many Moods of Little Pattie in 1964.[1]

Awards and nominationsEdit

ARIA Music AwardsEdit

The ARIA Music Awards is an annual awards ceremony that recognises excellence, innovation, and achievement across all genres of Australian music. They commenced in 1987. Little Pattie was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2009.[34]

Year Nominee / work Award Result
ARIA Music Awards of 2009 herself ARIA Hall of Fame inductee

Australian Women in Music AwardsEdit

The Australian Women in Music Awards is an annual event that celebrates outstanding women in the Australian Music Industry who have made significant and lasting contributions in their chosen field. They commenced in 2018.

Year Nominee / work Award Result
2018[35] Patricia Amphlett Lifetime Achievement Awards awarded

Go-Set Pop PollEdit

The Go-Set Pop Poll was coordinated by teen-oriented pop music newspaper, Go-Set and was established in February 1966 and conducted an annual poll during 1966 to 1972 of its readers to determine the most popular personalities.[36]

Year Nominee / work Award Result
1966 herself Female Vocal 4th
1967 herself Female Vocal 5th
1968 herself Female Vocal 4th

Mo AwardsEdit

The Australian Entertainment Mo Awards (commonly known informally as the Mo Awards), were annual Australian entertainment industry awards. They recognise achievements in live entertainment in Australia from 1975 to 2016. Little Pattie won one award in that time.[37]

Year Nominee / work Award Result (wins only)
2009 Little Pattie John Campbell Fellowship Award Won

Honours and awardsEdit

  Vietnam Logistic and Support Medal

  Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM)

ReferencesEdit

General
  • Brown, Graeme (1997). Little Pattie: an overview of the musical career of Little Pattie. Moonlight Publishing. ISBN 978-1-876187-18-7.
  • Johnson, Bruce (2004). "An interview with Patricia Thompson (Little Pattie)". Popular Music and Society. Routledge. 27 (1): 55–77. doi:10.1080/0300776042000166611. ISSN 0300-7766. S2CID 194080544.
  • McFarlane, Ian (1999). "Encyclopedia entry for 'Little Pattie'". Encyclopedia of Australian Rock and Pop. St Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin. ISBN 1-86508-072-1. Archived from the original on 30 September 2004. Retrieved 24 September 2009.
  • McGrath, Noel (1984) [1978]. "Noel McGrath's Australian Encyclopaedia of Rock & Pop". Australian Encyclopaedia of Rock & Pop. Adelaide: Rigby. ISBN 0-7270-1909-0.[38]
  • Spencer, Chris (1990). An Australian Rock Discography 1960–1989. Golden Square, Vic: Moonlight Publishing. ISBN 0-7316-8343-9.
  • Spencer, Chris; Paul McHenry; Zbig Nowara (2002) [1987]. The Who's Who of Australian Rock (5th ed.). Noble Park, Vic: Five Mile Press. p. 227. ISBN 978-1-86503-891-9.
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t McFarlane, (1999), "Little Pattie". Archived from the original on 30 September 2004. Retrieved 24 September 2009.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r "Patricia Amphlett – Little Pattie". Talking Heads with Peter Thompson. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 12 February 2007. Archived from the original on 3 October 2009. Retrieved 24 September 2009.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h "9991810 Patricia Thelma 'Little Pattie' Amphlett, OAM". Who's who in Australian Military History. Australian War Memorial. Retrieved 24 September 2009.
  4. ^ a b c d Kent, David (2005). Australian Chart Book 1940–1969. Turramurra, New South Wales: Australian Chart Book Pty Ltd. ISBN 0-646-44439-5. Note: Australia had no contemporaneous national charts until Go-Set published their Australian National Charts from 5 October 1966. Chart positions for 1940–1969 were back calculated by David Kent in 2005.
  5. ^ a b c "Timeline: 9991810 Patricia Thelma 'Little Pattie' Amphlett, OAM". Who's who in Australian Military History. Australian War Memorial. Retrieved 24 September 2009.
  6. ^ a b c "Little Pattie – He's My Blonde-Headed Stompie-Wompie Real Gone Surfer Boy". Pop Archives. Retrieved 25 September 2009.
  7. ^ "Distinguished Old Girls". The History of Sydney Girls High School. Sydney Girls High School. Archived from the original on 22 June 2008. Retrieved 25 May 2008.
  8. ^ a b Doherty, Linda (12 December 2002). "Stomper wows real gone girls, but she's just Pattie". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 25 September 2009.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h "Artist: Little Pattie – Stories and Highlights". Long Way to the Top – Stories of Australian Rock N' Roll. Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). 2001. Retrieved 24 September 2009.
  10. ^ ""He's My Blonde Headed Stompie Wompie, Real Gone Surfer Boy" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 24 September 2009.
  11. ^ ""Stompin' At Maroubra" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 24 September 2009.
  12. ^ "Little Pattie – Pushin' a Good Thing Too Far". Pop Archives. Retrieved 25 September 2009.
  13. ^ McFarlane, Ian (1999). "Encyclopedia entry for 'Col Joye'". Encyclopedia of Australian Rock and Pop. St Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin. ISBN 1-86508-072-1. Archived from the original on 28 August 2004. Retrieved 24 September 2009.
  14. ^ a b c d e "Special Fundraising Tour – Patricia Amphlett OAM (Little Pattie)". Australian Vietnam Volunteers Resource Group Incorporated (AVVRG). Archived from the original on 15 September 2009. Retrieved 29 September 2009.
  15. ^ "Vietnam war vets raise money for Nui Dat kindergarten". Radio Australia Today. Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). 17 August 2009. Retrieved 25 September 2009.
  16. ^ "ABC Online – Long Way to the Top". Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). 22 November 2002. Archived from the original on 24 November 2010. Retrieved 13 September 2009.
  17. ^ "Episode 1: Bed of a Thousand Struggles 1956–1964". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 25 September 2009. NOTE: The website quotes her as Little Patti [sic].
  18. ^ "Long Way to the Top – Live in Concert – DVD". Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). Archived from the original on 14 September 2007. Retrieved 13 September 2009.
  19. ^ Long Way to the Top – Live in Concert (Media notes). Various Artists. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 2002.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  20. ^ a b "Search Australian Honours – Advanced Search – Name: AMPHLETT, Patricia Thelma". It's an Honour – Australia Celebrating Australians. 9 June 2003. Retrieved 24 September 2009.
  21. ^ a b "ARIA 2009 Hall of Fame announcement of inductees" (PDF). Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). 17 July 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 September 2009. Retrieved 23 July 2009.
  22. ^ a b Cashmere, Paul (18 July 2009). "Mental As Anything, John Paul Young head to the Hall of Fame". Undercover.com.au. Cashmere Media Pty Ltd. Archived from the original on 19 July 2009. Retrieved 19 July 2009.
  23. ^ a b Collins, Simon (19 July 2009). "Love is in the Air at the ARIA Hall of Fame". The West Australian. West Australian Newspapers Limited. Archived from the original on 21 April 2009. Retrieved 19 July 2009.
  24. ^ Adams, Cameron (27 August 2009). "ARIA Award may heal Mental as Anything rift". Herald Sun. Retrieved 28 August 2009.
  25. ^ Duncan Kimball, ed. (2002). "HIS MASTER'S VOICE (HMV)". MILESAGO: Australasian Music and Popular Culture 1964–1975. ICE Productions. Retrieved 25 September 2009.
  26. ^ Duncan Kimball, ed. (2002). "ATA RECORDS". MILESAGO: Australasian Music and Popular Culture 1964–1975. ICE Productions. Retrieved 25 September 2009.
  27. ^ Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992 (illustrated ed.). St Ives, N.S.W.: Australian Chart Book. p. 178. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.
  28. ^ a b "Go-Set search engine results for "Little Pattie"". Go-Set. Waverley Press. Retrieved 23 October 2009. NOTE: Go-Set published its national charts from October 1966 until August 1974
  29. ^ "Go-Set Australian charts – 31 May 1967". Go-Set. Waverley Press. Retrieved 31 August 2009.
  30. ^ "International News Reports: Essex Music Scoring High on Aussie Chart". Billboard. Nielsen Company. 9 December 1967. p. 82.
  31. ^ Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992. St Ives, NSW: Australian Chart Book. ISBN 0-646-11917-6. Note: Used for Australian Singles and Albums charting from 1974 until ARIA created their own charts in mid-1988. In 1992, Kent back calculated chart positions for 1970–1974.
  32. ^ "Chart Watch". 5 July 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2021.
  33. ^ "I Touch Myself 2014". I Touch Myself. Retrieved 18 March 2021.
  34. ^ "Winners by Award: Hall of Fame". Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved 23 October 2020.
  35. ^ "2018 Recipients Finalists". women in Music Awards. October 2018. Retrieved 19 March 2021.
  36. ^ "Australian Music Awards". Ron Jeff. Retrieved 16 December 2010.
  37. ^ "MO Award Winners". Mo Awards. Retrieved 16 March 2022.
  38. ^ Noel McGrath's Australian encyclopaedia of rock & pop / Noel McGrath. catalogue. National Library of Australia. 1984. ISBN 9780727019097. Retrieved 24 September 2009.

External linksEdit