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Listed buildings in Bunbury, Cheshire

Bunbury is a civil parish in Cheshire East, England. It contains 31 buildings that are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as designated listed buildings. Of these, one is listed at Grade I, the highest grade, one is listed at Grade II*, the middle grade, and the others are at Grade II. The parish contains the settlements of Bunbury, Bunbury Heath, and Lower Bunbury, with surrounding countryside. Many of the listed buildings are houses, cottages, farmhouses and farm buildings, some dating back to the 17th century and timber-framed. The other buildings are a church and associated structures, a public house, a former school, an active school, and a watermill.

KeyEdit

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Grade Criteria[1]
I Buildings of exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important
II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest
II Buildings of national importance and special interest

BuildingsEdit

Name and location Photograph Date Notes Grade
St Boniface's Church
53°07′06″N 2°38′43″W / 53.1182°N 2.6453°W / 53.1182; -2.6453 (St Boniface's Church)
1320 The church was built on the site of an earlier church, and it was endowed as a collegiate church in 1385–86. It was extended in the 16th and 18th centuries, and restored in 1863–66. The church was damaged by a land mine in 1940. It is constructed in sandstone, and is in Perpendicular style. Inside the church are fragments of wall paintings, a chapel screen with paintings dating from about 1420, a free-standing monument in the chancel to Sir Hugh Calveley who died in 1394, and in the north wall of the sanctuary a monument to Sir George Beeston who died in 1601 at the age of 102.[2][3][4] I
Gravestone,
St Boniface's Church
53°07′06″N 2°38′41″W / 53.11824°N 2.64476°W / 53.11824; -2.64476 (Gravestone)
Early 16th century (probable) The gravestone consists of two red sandstone slabs, joined and sloping from each other to give the appearance of a pitched roof. They are carved with a cross shaft on a base of three steps, and a very high cross tree. There is no visible inscription.[5] II
Chantry House
53°07′01″N 2°38′47″W / 53.11701°N 2.64638°W / 53.11701; -2.64638 (Chantry House)
1527 The chantry house is constructed in timber-framing with close studding on a sandstone plinth. The panels are plastered, and the roof is slated. The house is in two storeys, and has a front of three bays. The east front has a jettied gable. A south wing was added, and other alterations were made in the 1970s. Inside the house are four fireplaces with Tudor arches.[6][7] II*
Brook Farmhouse
53°07′12″N 2°38′17″W / 53.11994°N 2.63811°W / 53.11994; -2.63811 (Brook Farmhouse)
Early 17th century The farmhouse is timber-framed with brick nogging on a stone plinth, and has a slate roof. It is in a single storey with an attic, and has a three-bay front. The windows are casements, those in the upper floor being in gabled dormers with bargeboards. A later south wing gives the building a T-shaped plan.[8] II
Brook Farm Cottage
53°07′12″N 2°38′16″W / 53.11998°N 2.63781°W / 53.11998; -2.63781 (Brook Farm Cottage)
Early 17th century The building originated as a barn, and was later converted into a cottage. It is timber-framed with brick nogging on a stone plinth, and has a slate roof. The cottage is in two storeys, and has a two-bay front. The windows are casements, those in the upper floor being in gabled dormers with bargeboards.[9] II
Bunbury Cottage and Tudor Cottage
53°06′57″N 2°39′07″W / 53.11571°N 2.65207°W / 53.11571; -2.65207 (Bunbury Cottage and Tudor Cottage)
Early 17th century Two timber-framed cottages with brick nogging on a sandstone plinth and thatched roofs. They are in a single storey with an attic, and have a three-bay front. The windows are casements; in the upper floor one is in a thatched half-dormer, and the others are in gables.[10] II
Bunbury Locks Cottage, Black and White Cottage, and Black and White House
53°07′37″N 2°38′01″W / 53.12702°N 2.63362°W / 53.12702; -2.63362 (Bunbury Locks Cottage, Black and White Cottage, and Black and White House)
Early 17th century A row of three cottages that are timber-framed with brick nogging and an asbestos-cement slate roof. They are in two storeys with an attic, and have a three-bay front. The left bay projects slightly forward, is gabled and forms a wing, giving the building a T-shaped plan. The windows are casements.[11] II
Tilstonebank Cottage
53°07′41″N 2°38′47″W / 53.12792°N 2.64625°W / 53.12792; -2.64625 (Tilstonebank Cottage)
Early 17th century Originally three cottages, it has been converted into a single dwelling, and a wing has been added to the north. The building is timber-framed with plastered brick nogging and a tiled roof, and is in two storeys. The windows are mullioned and contain casements, those in the upper floor being in gabled dormers surmounted by finials.[12] II
Woodworth Green Farmhouse
53°06′49″N 2°37′52″W / 53.11361°N 2.63111°W / 53.11361; -2.63111 (Woodworth Green Farmhouse)
Early 17th century The farmhouse is built in brick on a sandstone plinth and has a slate roof. It is in two storeys, it has an F-shaped plan, and there are entrance and garden fronts each of two bays. The windows are casements. Inside is an 18th-century staircase decorated with marquetry, which has been moved from another building.[13][14] II
Barn,
Woodworth Green Farm
53°06′50″N 2°37′52″W / 53.11390°N 2.63115°W / 53.11390; -2.63115 (Barn, Woodworth Green Farm)
Early 17th century The barn is basically timber-framed on a sandstone plinth. It is clad and roofed in corrugated metal sheet. The barn has two storeys, and is in three bays.[13][15] II
Barn, Priestland
53°07′27″N 2°39′35″W / 53.12405°N 2.65980°W / 53.12405; -2.65980 (Barn, Priestland)
Late 17th century The barn is timber-framed and oak boarded, with a corrugated metal sheet roof. It stands on a sandstone plinth, and has a front of three bays. There are finials on the gable ends.[16] II
Chapel Cottage
53°06′52″N 2°39′07″W / 53.11449°N 2.65199°W / 53.11449; -2.65199 (Chapel Cottage)
Late 17th century The cottage is basically timber-framed, most of which has been encased or rebuilt in brick. It has a thatched roof, and is in a single storey with an attic. The cottage has a two-bay front, and a later extension to the rear. The windows are casements.[13][17] II
Church Bank Cottage
53°07′04″N 2°38′45″W / 53.11783°N 2.64595°W / 53.11783; -2.64595 (Church Bank Cottage)
Late 17th century The cottage is timber-framed with plastered brick nogging on a sandstone plinth. It has tiled roof, and is in a single storey with an attic. A west wing was added in the 20th century.[13][18] II
Church Farmhouse
53°07′05″N 2°38′47″W / 53.11816°N 2.64641°W / 53.11816; -2.64641 (Church Farmhouse)
Late 17th century The original part of the farmhouse is the south wing. This is partly timber-framed with brick nogging, and partly in brick, and is in four bays. The windows are casements, those in the upper storey being in gabled dormers with finials. The north wing was added in the 19th century, it is in brick, and has a small hexagonal bay window. The whole building is in two storeys, with a tiled roof.[19] II
Little Orchard
53°07′07″N 2°38′46″W / 53.11871°N 2.64604°W / 53.11871; -2.64604 (Little Orchard)
Late 17th century A brick house with some timber-framing and a tiled roof. It is in two storeys with an attic, and has a two-bay front. There are extensions to the rear. Above the central doorway is an arched recess that rises up to the eaves; the arch and the eaves are dentilled. The windows are casements, and a dormer has been inserted in the roof. Inside the house is an inglenook.[20] II
Birchfield
53°07′05″N 2°38′40″W / 53.11819°N 2.64447°W / 53.11819; -2.64447 (Birchfield)
Early 18th century A brick house on a stone plinth with a slate roof, it is in two storeys with an attic.. The house has a double-pile plan and a front of three bays, with a single-story extension to the east. The windows are mullioned and transomed, and contain casements. Above the door is an open pediment.[21] II
Dysart Arms public house
53°07′07″N 2°38′46″W / 53.11849°N 2.64611°W / 53.11849; -2.64611 (Dysart Arms)
Early 18th century The public house is built in brick on a sandstone plinth, and has a tiled roof. A 19th-century extension has given it a double-pile plan. The public house is in two storeys, with a two-bay front. The windows are mullioned, and contain three-light casements. In the centre of the entrance front is a gabled porch with a finial.[13][22] II
Oak Cottage
53°07′13″N 2°39′33″W / 53.12032°N 2.65922°W / 53.12032; -2.65922 (Oak Cottage)
Early 18th century The cottage is timber-framed with brick nogging, some of which has been plastered, and stands on a sandstone plinth. It has a roof of asbestos-cement slate. The cottage is in two storeys, and has a front of two bays, with a 19th-century lean-to extension. The windows are casements, and the gables contain bargeboards.[23] II
Priestland
53°07′25″N 2°39′34″W / 53.12359°N 2.65943°W / 53.12359; -2.65943 (Priestland)
Early 18th century A brick farmhouse on a sandstone plinth with a slate roof, which was later altered and extended. It is in two storeys, and has a three-bay front. The windows are sashes, and the doorcase is flanked by fluted pilasters.[24] II
Rowton Cottage
53°06′40″N 2°39′11″W / 53.11100°N 2.65308°W / 53.11100; -2.65308 (Rowton Cottage)
Early 18th century The cottage is built in sandstone and has a slate roof. It has a double-pile plan, is in two storeys, and has a two-bay front. The gables contain sash windows; the other windows are casements.[13][25] II
Sundial
53°07′05″N 2°38′43″W / 53.11806°N 2.64520°W / 53.11806; -2.64520 (Sundial)
1740 The sundial is in the churchyard of St Boniface's Church. It is constructed in red sandstone, and consists of a turned baluster-shape pillar on two square stone steps. The top projects and holds a calibrated bronze plate and pointer, and is inscribed with names and the date.[26] II
Brantwood
53°06′57″N 2°39′06″W / 53.11584°N 2.65164°W / 53.11584; -2.65164 (Brantwood)
18th century The centrepiece is a bridewell around which was built a cottage in 1831. The bridewell forms the entrance hall, and is in sandstone. The rest of the cottage is in brick with a slate roof. It is in two storeys, and has a three-bay front. Most of the windows are casements.[27] II
North gates,
St Boniface's Church
53°07′07″N 2°38′42″W / 53.11865°N 2.64513°W / 53.11865; -2.64513 (North gates, St Boniface's Church)
18th century A pair of gate piers and gates, which have been subsequently restored on three occasions. The piers are in sandstone with a square plan, and have moulded caps with ball finials. They are inscribed with names and the dates of the restorations. The gates are in timber and metal.[28] II
Bunbury Millhouse
53°07′06″N 2°38′24″W / 53.11837°N 2.64000°W / 53.11837; -2.64000 (Bunbury Millhouse)
Early 19th century This was originally the miller's house, later converted into a private house. It is constructed in brick with a slate roof, and is in two storeys. The front is in two bays, with an added west bay, and a later north wing, giving it a T-shaped plan. The door is approached up two steps, and the windows are mullioned and transomed.[29] II
Image House
53°07′20″N 2°39′43″W / 53.12221°N 2.66191°W / 53.12221; -2.66191 (Image House)
Early 19th century A brick cottage on a stone plinth with a slate roof. It is in two storeys, and has a two-bay front, with lean-to extensions on the south and the west. The windows are casements, those in the upper floor being flanked by carved stone figures of small men in breeches and hats. The porch is carried on oak posts with stone capitals.[13][30] II
The Stores
53°06′59″N 2°39′03″W / 53.11632°N 2.65078°W / 53.11632; -2.65078 (The Stores)
Early 19th century This is a shop and a house built in brick with a slate roof. It has an L-shaped plan, the west front having two bays, and the south front three. At the corner of the building is the shop entrance; this has a fluted doorcase with a tympanum above. The tympanum leans outwards and contains the figure of a man wearing a kilt, holding a coil of rope and a long tobacco pipe.[31] II
Bunbury School
53°07′10″N 2°38′48″W / 53.11934°N 2.64663°W / 53.11934; -2.64663 (Bunbury School)
1830 This was built as a school with an attached schoolmaster's house, and has since been converted into dwellings. It is constructed in chequered brick on a sandstone plinth, and has a slate roof. The building extends for five bays; it is mainly in a single storey, but the south bay, which was the master's house, has two storeys. The house is set at right angles to the school. Two of the bays of the school are gabled. The windows are mullioned and transomed, and contain casements.[13][32] II
Bunbury Mill
53°07′05″N 2°38′22″W / 53.11811°N 2.63951°W / 53.11811; -2.63951 (Bunbury Mill)
c. 1850 A watermill built in brick with a slate roof, and a front of two bays. On the south face is a taking-in door under a small gable. The west and east sides are gabled, with three windows in the west side. The north side contains an entrance door and other openings. The mill pool lies to the south and the mill stream runs to the east.[13][33] II
Bunbury Aldersey School
53°07′02″N 2°39′20″W / 53.11719°N 2.65560°W / 53.11719; -2.65560 (Bunbury Aldersey School)
1874 Originally a grammar school, and later a primary school, it was designed by John Douglas. It is constructed in red brick on a sandstone plinth and has a slate roof. Its style is Tudor, it is in a single storey, and has a front of five bays. The entrance bay projects forwards and its entrance has a Tudor arch, above which is a gable with a finial. On the roof are lucarnes and an octagonal slate turret.[34][35][36] II
Church Cottages
53°07′08″N 2°38′45″W / 53.11876°N 2.64575°W / 53.11876; -2.64575 (Church Cottages)
1874 A row of five brick cottages with blue tile roofs, built for the Peckforton estate. They are in two storeys, and each cottage has a front of two bays. At each end is a single-storey lean-to extension. The windows are casements. On the front are three gables with applied timber-framing and finials. Above the central door is a carved stone plaque.[13][37] II
West gates,
St Boniface's Church
53°07′06″N 2°38′45″W / 53.11828°N 2.64588°W / 53.11828; -2.64588 (West gates, St Boniface's Church)
1920 The gates and gate piers were erected as a war memorial. There are two tall piers with a pair of timber gates, flanked by a pair of lower piers with single gates. The piers are in sandstone, the taller ones surmounted by ogee cornices and ball finials. On the west fronts are plaques inscribed with names. The lower piers have caps with four-way tops. Between the taller piers is an overthrow carrying a hexagonal lantern.[6][38] II

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Citations

  1. ^ Listed Buildings, Historic England, retrieved 30 March 2015
  2. ^ Hartwell et al. (2011), pp. 191–194
  3. ^ Richards (1947), pp. 74–82
  4. ^ Historic England, "The Church of St Boniface, Bunbury (1138626)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 December 2013
  5. ^ Historic England, "Gravestone in St Boniface's Churchyard 5m to east, Bunbury (1330102)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 December 2013
  6. ^ a b Hartwell et al. (2011), p. 194
  7. ^ Historic England, "The Chantry House, Bunbury (1138635)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 December 2013
  8. ^ Historic England, "Brook Farmhouse, Bunbury (1138664)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 5 December 2013
  9. ^ Historic England, "Brook Farm Cottage, Bunbury (1136085)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 December 2013
  10. ^ Historic England, "Bunbury Cottage, Tudor Cottage, Bunbury (1138632)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 December 2013
  11. ^ Historic England, "Bunbury Locks Cottage, Black and White Cottage, and Black and White House, Bunbury (1136074)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 December 2013
  12. ^ Historic England, "Tilstonebank Cottage, Bunbury (1330106)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 December 2013
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Hartwell et al. (2011), p. 195
  14. ^ Historic England, "Woodworth Green Farmhouse, Bunbury (1136063)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 December 2013
  15. ^ Historic England, "Barn north of Woodworth Green Farmhouse, Bunbury (1138663)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 5 December 2013
  16. ^ Historic England, "Barn north of Priestland, Bunbury (1330107)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 5 December 2013
  17. ^ Historic England, "Chapel Cottage, Bunbury (1330105)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 5 December 2013
  18. ^ Historic England, "Church Bank Cottage, Bunbury (1136180)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 December 2013
  19. ^ Historic England, "Church Farmhouse, Bunbury (1136167)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 December 2013
  20. ^ Historic England, "Little Orchard, Bunbury (1330104)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 5 December 2013
  21. ^ Historic England, "Birchfield, Bunbury (1330101)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 5 December 2013
  22. ^ Historic England, "The Dysart Arms Public House, Bunbury (1138630)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 December 2013
  23. ^ Historic England, "Oak Cottage, Bunbury (1136189)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 December 2013
  24. ^ Historic England, "Priestland, Bunbury (1138633)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 December 2013
  25. ^ Historic England, "Rowton Cottage, Bunbury (1136131)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 December 2013
  26. ^ Historic England, "Sundial in St Boniface's Churchyard 10m to south, Bunbury (1138627)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 December 2013
  27. ^ Historic England, "Brantwood, Bunbury (1312918)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 5 December 2013
  28. ^ Historic England, "North gates to St Boniface's Churchyard, Bunbury (1330103)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 December 2013
  29. ^ Historic England, "Bunbury Millhouse (1138625)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 December 2013
  30. ^ Historic England, "The Image House, Bunbury (1136176)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 December 2013
  31. ^ Historic England, "The Stores, Bunbury (1138634)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 December 2013
  32. ^ Historic England, "Bunbury School (1138631)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 December 2013
  33. ^ Historic England, "Bunbury Mill (1138624)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 December 2013
  34. ^ Hartwell et al. (2011), pp. 194–195
  35. ^ Hubbard (1991), p. 245
  36. ^ Historic England, "Bunbury Aldersey School (1136159)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 December 2013
  37. ^ Historic England, "Church Cottage, The Crest, Trelawn, Rose Cottage, and Widow's Cottage, Bunbury (1138629)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 4 December 2013
  38. ^ Historic England, "West gates to St Boniface's Churchyard, Bunbury (1138628)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 3 December 2013

Sources