List of diplomatic missions of the Ottoman Empire

The Ottoman Empire's embassies were first established in the 1830s.[1]

In 1870 the first permanent Ottoman diplomatic mission opened in London.[2] The Ottoman Empire began classifying missions as great embassies, as legations/first class embassies, second class embassies, and third class embassies, beginning in 1886.[3]

Europe edit

North America edit

South America edit

See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ a b Kuneralp, Sinan. "Ottoman Diplomatic and Consular Personnel in the United States of America, 1867-1917." In: Criss, Nur Bilge, Selçuk Esenbel, Tony Greenwood, and Louis Mazzari (editors). American Turkish Encounters: Politics and Culture, 1830-1989 (EBSCO Ebook Academic Collection). Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 12 July 2011. ISBN 144383260X, 9781443832601. Start: p. 100. CITED: p. 100.
  2. ^ "Brief History of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Turkey / Rep. Of Turkey Ministry of Foreign Affairs". Archived from the original on 2011-05-14.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s İhsanoğlu, Ekmeleddin. History of the Ottoman State, society & civilisation: Vol. 1. IRCICA, Research Centre for Islamic History, Art and Culture, 2001. ISBN 9290630531, 9789290630531. p. 343. "Changes which were initiated in 1886 divided Ottoman embassies into four categories." - View #2: "second class embassies in Washington and Montenegro[...]The Berlin legation was opened in 1837,[...] View #3: in Stockholm in 1898,[...]The Ottoman state opened its final embassy in 1918 in the capital of the Ukrainian Republic founded after the Russian Revolution. Following the unification of Italy, the embassies in the capital[...]"
  4. ^ Turkish Yearbook of International Relations. Ankara Üniversitesi Diş Munasebetler Enstitüsü, 2000. (head book says 2000/2 Special Issue of Turkish-American Relations. Issue 31, Page 13. p. 13. "[...] at the head of the Washington mission which was raised to Embassy level in 1912,[...]"
  5. ^ Kuneralp, Sinan. "Ottoman Diplomatic and Consular Personnel in the United States of America, 1867-1917." In: Criss, Nur Bilge, Selçuk Esenbel, Tony Greenwood, and Louis Mazzari (editors). American Turkish Encounters: Politics and Culture, 1830-1989 (EBSCO Ebook Academic Collection). Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 12 July 2011. ISBN 144383260X, 9781443832601. Start: p. 100. CITED: p. 103.
  6. ^ Kuneralp, Sinan. "Ottoman Diplomatic and Consular Personnel in the United States of America, 1867-1917." In: Criss, Nur Bilge, Selçuk Esenbel, Tony Greenwood, and Louis Mazzari (editors). American Turkish Encounters: Politics and Culture, 1830-1989 (EBSCO Ebook Academic Collection). Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 12 July 2011. ISBN 144383260X, 9781443832601. Start: p. 100. CITED: p. 106.
  7. ^ Kuneralp, Sinan. "Ottoman Diplomatic and Consular Personnel in the United States of America, 1867-1917." In: Criss, Nur Bilge, Selçuk Esenbel, Tony Greenwood, and Louis Mazzari (editors). American Turkish Encounters: Politics and Culture, 1830-1989 (EBSCO Ebook Academic Collection). Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 12 July 2011. ISBN 144383260X, 9781443832601. Start: p. 100. CITED: p. 107.
  8. ^ Temel, Mehmet. "Osmanli Arşiv Kaynaklarina Göre XIX. VE XX. Yuzyilin başlarinda Osmanli-Brezilya ilişkileri" [Ottoman–Brazilian Relations in the 19th Century and in the Beginning of the 20th, According to Ottoman Archival Sources], Belleten-Türk Tarih Kurumu 68:251 (2004). Abstract. (Archive)