Leonor Lasso de la Vega

Leonor Lasso de la Vega (b. before 1367 - d. 1432) was a Spanish noble woman from Cantabria and head of the prestigious House of Lasso de la Vega from 1367 - 1432.

Coat of Arms of the House of Lasso de la Vega.
the house where Leonor gave birth to Íñigo López de Mendoza, in Carrión de los Condes (Palencia).
Castle of Castrillo de Villavega, belonged to the family of Leonor.

Family OriginsEdit

Leonor was the paternal great-granddaughter of Garci Lasso de la Vega I, the chancellor of the Kingdom of Castile, who was executed in 1326 by order of King Alfonso XI of Castile, and his wife Juana de Castañeda. She was the paternal granddaughter of Garci Lasso de la Vega II, assassinated by Peter of Castile in 1351, who was the highest royal official to the court of Fadrique Alfonso de Castilla, son of King Alfonso XI of Castile, and his wife, Leonor González de Cornado. She was the only daughter of Garci Lasso Ruiz de la Vega, who spent his life in the service of Henry II of Castile and was killed at the Battle of Nájera in 1367 whereupon Leonor rose to the position of head of house.

BiographyEdit

She was a lifelong benefactor of the Monasterio de Santa Clara de Castrojeríz which was founded by her grandparents, Garci Lasso de la Vega II and Leonor González de Cornado.[1]

Marriage, Descendants and LegacyEdit

Leonor's first marriage was with Juan Téllez de Castilla, the second lord of Aguilar de Campoo and the second lord of Castañeda. He was the son of Tello de Castilla who was in turn, the illegitimate son of Alfonso XI of Castile and Eleanor de Guzmán. The couple had the following children:

When Tello died on 14 August 1385 at the Battle of Aljubarrota, Leonor remarried in 1387 with Diego Hurtado de Mendoza, High Admiral of Castile, bringing with her dowry, the title over the town of Carrión de los Condes and a manor at Asturias de Santillana. The two had the following children:

In August 1432,[3] Leonor empowered her children Íñigo, Gonzalo y Elvira to draft her last will and testament, by which process, her daughter from her first marriage, Aldonza was disinherited.

After her death, all her domains went to the House of Mendoza through Íñigo López de Mendoza. In 1445 King, John II of Castile confirmed this action by granting the title of Marquis of Santillana, where after Santillana del Mar which became the center of the lordship of Torrelavega in Cantabria.

The Cantabrian surname "Lasso de la Vega" was passed on through this maternal line at later times throughout the years and is associated with various soldiers, poets, and golden age writers such as Garcilaso de la Vega, the soldier and poet, and Inca Garcilaso, the historian from the Viceroyalty of Peru.

Preceded by
Garci Lasso Ruiz de la Vega
Head of the House of Lasso de la Vega
1367–1432
Succeeded by
Íñigo López de Mendoza

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Real Academia de Historia, Colección Salazar y Castro, ref. M-19, fº 276v a 282: Marth 30th, 1420, Deed executed by Dona Leonor de la Vega, the wife of Diego Hurtado de Mendoza, granddaughter of Garcilasso de la Vega and Leonor de Cornado, founders of the Monastery of St. Clare of Castrojeriz, by which she donated to the monastery certain estates. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-06-13. Retrieved 2013-07-14.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ Real Academia de Historia, Colección Salazar y Castro, ref. M-5, fº 282 "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-06-13. Retrieved 2013-07-14.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ Real Academia de Historia, Colección Salazar y Castro, ref. M-1, fº 137 "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-06-13. Retrieved 2013-07-14.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  • The information on this page was mostly translated from its Spanish equivalent

BibliographyEdit

  • Helen Nader, The Mendoza Family in the Spanish Renaissance (1350-1550) [1]