Lebbeus Egerton

Lebbeus Egerton (May 4, 1773 – August 18, 1846) was a Vermont militia officer and farmer who served as Lieutenant Governor from 1831 to 1835.

Lebbeus Egerton
Member of the Vermont Senate
In office
1837–1839
9th Lieutenant Governor of Vermont
In office
1831–1835
Preceded byMark Richards
Succeeded bySilas H. Jennison
Member of the Vermont House of Representatives
In office
1825–1826
Personal details
Born(1773-05-04)May 4, 1773
Norwich, Connecticut
DiedAugust 18, 1846(1846-08-18) (aged 73)
Randolph, Vermont
Resting placeRandolph Center Cemetery, Randolph, Vermont
Political partyAnti-Masonic
Spouse(s)Catharine Doty Egerton (1774–1826)
Elizabeth Potter Egerton (1781–1848)
ProfessionFarmer
Military service
Branch/serviceUnited States Army
Vermont Militia
RankCaptain
Battles/warsWar of 1812

BiographyEdit

Lebbeus Egerton was born in Norwich, Connecticut on May 4, 1773.[1] His family moved to Randolph, Vermont in the early 1780s and Egerton became a farmer.[2]

During the War of 1812 Egerton served as a Captain. Initially commissioned in the 31st United States Infantry Regiment, Egerton subsequently raised and commanded a company in the Vermont militia during the Plattsburgh campaign, with Martin Flint as his second in command. Egerton later served as adjutant of a regiment.[3][4][5][6]

Egerton served in the Vermont House of Representatives from 1825 to 1826, and was a delegate to the 1828 Vermont constitutional convention. He was Randolph's Town Clerk from 1830 to 1833.[7] During his life Egerton also served in other local offices, including town Selectman.[8]

Active as an Anti-Mason, in 1831 Egerton was elected Lieutenant Governor and he served until 1835. Because the annual elections were three way races, Egerton did not receive the majority required by the Vermont constitution, so he was chosen each year by the Vermont Legislature.[9][10][11][12][13][14][15]

During the early to mid-1830s Egerton was responsible for designing and overseeing construction of the second Vermont State House.[16][17][18]

From 1837 to 1839 Egerton served in the Vermont Senate.[19][20][21]

Egerton died in Randolph on August 18, 1846 and was buried in Randolph Center Cemetery.[22][23]

His Randolph Center home still stands and is a privately owned residence.[24][25]

OtherEdit

His first name is sometimes written "Lebberis", "Libbeus" or "Lebbons", and his surname sometimes appears in records as "Edgerton".

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Vital Records of Norwich, 1659 – 1848, Part II, pages 165 to 220, transcribed by Coralynn Brown. Retrieved December 28, 2011
  2. ^ Photos and records, Lebbeus Edgerton House, Historic Map Works web site, 2011
  3. ^ The Vermont Historical Gazetteer, by Carrie Elizabeth Hemenway Page, Volume 2, 1871, page 998
  4. ^ An Anxious Democracy: Aspects of the 1830s, by John J. Duffy and H. Nicholas Muller III, 1982, page 120
  5. ^ State of Vermont Roster of Soldiers in the War of 1812–14, prepared and published under the direction of Herbert T. Johnson, The Adjutant General, 1933, page 127
  6. ^ History of Royalton, Vermont: With Family Genealogies, 1769–1911, by Mary Evelyn Wood Lovejoy, Volume 1, 1911, page 441
  7. ^ Records of the Governor and Council of the State of Vermont, published by E. P. Walton, Montpelier, Volume 8, 1880, page 2
  8. ^ Vermont Year Book, Formerly Walton's Register, published by E. P. Walton, 1836, page 83
  9. ^ 1831 General Election results Archived February 15, 2012, at the Wayback Machine, published by Office of the Vermont Secretary of State, Vermont State Archives, June 9, 2006, page 1
  10. ^ 1832 General Election results Archived February 15, 2012, at the Wayback Machine, published by Office of the Vermont Secretary of State, Vermont State Archives, June 9, 2006, page 1
  11. ^ 1834 General Election results Archived February 15, 2012, at the Wayback Machine, published by Office of the Vermont Secretary of State, Vermont State Archives, June 9, 2006, page 1
  12. ^ General Election results, Lieutenant Governor, 1813–2008, published by Office of the Vermont Secretary of State, Archives and Records Administration, 2008, page 4
  13. ^ The Proceedings of the United States Anti-Masonic Convention, held at Philadelphia, September 11, 1830, published by I. P. Trimble, Philadelphia, and others, 1830, page 9
  14. ^ Newspaper article, Vermont Anti-Masonic Convention, Albany Evening Journal, February 23, 1832
  15. ^ Newspaper article, Vermont Anti-Masonic State Convention, Albany Evening Journal, May 28, 1834
  16. ^ Journal of the General Assembly of the State of Vermont, published by Ebenezer Eaton, Danville, 1832, page 14
  17. ^ Records of the Council of Safety and Governor and Council of the State of Vermont, published by E. P. Walton, Montpelier, Volume 8, 1880, page 269
  18. ^ Records of the Council of Safety and Governor and Council of the State of Vermont, published by E. P. Walton, Montpelier, Volume 5, 1877, page 437
  19. ^ Journal of the Senate of the State of Vermont, published by E. P. Walton, Montpelier, 1837, page 3
  20. ^ Memorial Encyclopedia of the State of Pennsylvania, edited by James A. Ellis, 1919, page 69
  21. ^ Journal of the Senate of the State of Vermont, published by E. P. Walton, Montpelier, 1839, page 9
  22. ^ Transcript, Randolph Center Cemetery gravestones, Randolph, Vermont, by Harriet Chase, 2002, Egerton – Fish page
  23. ^ Death notice, Lebbeus Egerton, Vermont Chronicle, September 9, 1846
  24. ^ Newspaper article, History of an Old House, by Miriam Herwig, Randolph Herald, October 23, 2003
  25. ^ Newspaper column, Runnion in Montpelier: 'Mim' Herwig Brings a Smile To the Vermont State House, by Norman Runnion, Randolph Herald, February 2, 2006
Political offices
Preceded by
Mark Richards
Lieutenant Governor of Vermont
1831–1835
Succeeded by
Silas H. Jennison