Lampton School is a secondary school and sixth form with academy status located in Hounslow, west London, England.

Lampton School
Address
Lampton Avenue

,
TW3 4EP

England
Coordinates51°28′38″N 0°22′05″W / 51.47709°N 0.36793°W / 51.47709; -0.36793Coordinates: 51°28′38″N 0°22′05″W / 51.47709°N 0.36793°W / 51.47709; -0.36793
Information
TypeAcademy
Established1959
Department for Education URN136341 Tables
OfstedReports
Head TeacherStephen Davis
Age11 to 19
Enrolment1389
Former nameSpring Grove Grammar School
Website

AdmissionsEdit

Lampton is a Leading Edge school, and is a training school which currently has around 1,358 students on roll. Lampton borders the A4 (Great West Road) in Hounslow, and is next to Lampton Park and Hounslow Civic Centre. This is about one mile west of Spring Grove, and a mile south of the M4 near Heston. Osterley Park is a mile to the north-east. Its ethnic mix reflects that of the local area, with most students being of Indian subcontinental heritage. The school has a wide range of ethnicities, including white British, and Polish, and around 30% of students receive free school meals.

Lampton also offers a 6th Form for pupils aged 16 and over, which takes the majority of its intake from Lampton GCSE students, but is also open to applicants from outside the school. The headteacher is Stephen Davis. He was preceded by Sue John, also known as Dame Susan Elizabeth John (born 1953), who was knighted in 2012 for her service to education.

Dame Sue John was later succeeded by Mr Stephen Davis, who has been the reigning Headteacher of Lampton School since that time.

HistoryEdit

Lampton School used to be known as Spring Grove Grammar School, a grammar school before being converted to a comprehensive. The school gained its Humanities Specialist status in 2003, a designation which enabled the building of the Language and Learning Zone (LLZ), a multi-media and Information and communication technologies suite situated at the western end of the Spring Grove building.

In recent years an ultra-modern Sixth Form Block resembling a barn (and fondly nicknamed thus) was constructed on what used to be a rather health and safety prone hockey gravel pit.

In 2013 a group of huts housing what was then the PSHE department was finalised. It had modern technology, a bay of computers and ergonomically designed seating options in order to “comfort” the children and the school's reputation better. However, in 2017 the PSHE department was relegated to a series of brutalist style huts towards the other end of the school and the new old huts became home to the drama department. In the summer break of 2018, the new old huts were torn down in favour of the construction of a new dining hall and performing arts centre. It has not been mentioned when this will follow the fate of the huts before it.

Academic performanceEdit

The last OFSTED inspection, in 2012, found the school to be "outstanding".[1] In 2009 Ofsted highlighted Lampton as one of 12 outstanding schools serving disadvantaged communities.[2]

The school's GCSE results are broadly average.[1] The school has in recent years, achieved above average results at both GCSE and A-Level.

Prime Minister's Global FellowshipEdit

The school has a good record of students attaining places on the Prime Minister's Global Fellowship programme. The school achieved its first student in the inaugural year of the programme, 2008, and in 2009 had two more successful applicants.[3]

Notable former pupilsEdit

Spring Grove Grammar SchoolEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b OFSTED Report, Lampton School
  2. ^ Twelve outstanding secondary schools – Excelling against the odds Archived 28 November 2011 at the Wayback Machine, Ofsted, 24 February 2009. Retrieved 23 February 2011.
  3. ^ British Council website "Fellows" Archived 12 September 2011 at the Wayback Machine accessed 10 November 2009.
  4. ^ Carlton Cole profile Archived 2 April 2015 at the Wayback Machine, West Ham United F.C.. Retrieved 16 June 2016.
  5. ^ Who's who in science in Europe, vol. 4, issue 1, F. Hodgson, 1984, p. 985
  6. ^ New Scientist, 31 October 1963, p. 283
  7. ^ Had Me a Real Good Time: The Faces Before During and After, Andy Neill, 2016, Omnibus Press

External linksEdit

News itemsEdit