La Petite Illustration

La Petite Illustration was a weekly French literary journal.[1] Being a supplement to L'Illustration it existed between 1913 and 26 August 1939.

Issue 79, 7 January 1922

History and profileEdit

La Petite Illustration was founded in 1913.[1] It was a newspaper supplement to L'Illustration[2] and published plays,[3][4] novels and short stories often first publishing and containing illustrations. The headquarters of the magazine was in Paris.[5]

The magazine has been noted that it published works on French Algeria.[6] It also covered articles on theatre.[7]

Contributors included Marcel Pagnol[8] and Isabelle Sandy,[9] among others.

La Petite Illustration ceased publication on 26 August 1939.[10] It was replaced by another theatrical journal, L'avant-scène théâtre.[11]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "La petite illustration roman-théatre N° 1". Rakuten. Retrieved 22 April 2020.
  2. ^ Roxanne Panchasi (2009). Future Tense: The Culture of Anticipation in France Between the Wars. Cornell University Press. p. 95. ISBN 978-0-8014-4670-2. Retrieved 24 December 2014.
  3. ^ Margaret A. Simons (ed.) and Simone de Beauvoir, Simone de Beauvoir: Philosophical Writings, University of Illinois Press, 2005, p. 74.
  4. ^ Mary Louise Roberts, Civilization Without Sexes: Reconstructing Gender in Postwar France, 1917-1927 (Women in Culture & Society), University of Chicago Press, 1994, p. 305.
  5. ^ "La Petite Illustration - 1937". AbeBooks. Retrieved 22 April 2020.
  6. ^ Patricia M. E. Lorcin, Imperial Identities: Stereotyping, Prejudice and Race in Colonial Algeria (Society & Culture in the Modern Middle East), I B Tauris & Co Ltd, 1995, p. 312.
  7. ^ "1938 La Petite Illustration". Paper Memories Plus. Retrieved 4 September 2016.
  8. ^ Maurice Bardeche, The History of Motion Pictures, 2007, p. 341.
  9. ^ La Petite Illustration, 25 May 1929, issue 431.
  10. ^ "La Petite Illustration. Série théâtre". BnF Data. Retrieved 22 April 2020.
  11. ^ Peter Nagy (ed.), Philippe Rouyer (ed.), The World Encyclopedia of Contemporary Theatre: Europe v.1: Europe Vol 1 (World Encyclopedia of Contemporary Theatre), Routledge, 1994, p. 322.

External linksEdit