Kyoto Prize in Advanced Technology

The Kyoto Prize in Advanced Technology is awarded once a year by the Inamori Foundation. The Prize is one of three Kyoto Prize categories; the others are the Kyoto Prize in Basic Sciences and the Kyoto Prize in Arts and Philosophy. The first Kyoto Prize in Advanced Technology was awarded to Rudolf E. Kálmán, the "creator of modern control and system theory".[1] The Prize is widely regarded as the most prestigious award available in fields which are traditionally not honored with a Nobel Prize.[2][3]

The Kyoto Prize in Advanced Technology
Kyoto Prize(U-S-A-) 2013-11-03 17-37.jpg
Awarded forGlobal achievement in Advanced Technology
LocationKyoto, Japan
Presented byInamori Foundation
First awarded1985
Websitekyotoprize.org
Rudolf E. Kálmán (born May 19, 1930), the first recipient of the Kyoto Prize in Advanced Technology.

FieldsEdit

The Kyoto Prize in Advanced Technology is awarded on a rotating basis to researchers in the following four fields:

  • Electronics
  • Biotechnology and Medical Technology
  • Materials Science and Engineering
  • Information Science

LaureatesEdit

ElectronicsEdit

Year Laureate Country
1985   Rudolf Emil Kalman   United States

  Hungary[4]

1930–2016 Establishment of the Modern Control Theory Based on the State Space Approach[5]
1989 Amos E. Joel, Jr.   United States 1918–2008 Pioneering Contribution to the Electronic Switching Technology for Telecommunications, Especially that Based on the Concept of "Stored Program Control"[6]
1993 Jack St. Clair Kilby   United States 1923–2005 Creation of the Concept of the Monolithic Semiconductor Integrated Circuit and Its Demonstration[7]
1997 Stanley Mazor   United States born 1941 Development of the World’s First Microprocessor[8][9][10][11]
Marcian Edward Hoff Jr.   United States born 1937
  Federico Faggin   Italy born 1941
Masatoshi Shima   Japan born 1943
2001 Morton B. Panish   United States born 1929 A Pioneering Step in the Development of Optoelectronics through Success in Continuous Operation of Semiconductor Lasers at Room Temperature[12][13][14]
Izuo Hayashi   Japan 1922–2005
  Zhores Ivanovich Alferov   Russia 1930–2019
2005   George H. Heilmeier   United States 1936–2014 Pioneering contributions to the realization of flat-panel displays using liquid crystals[15]
2009 Isamu Akasaki   Japan born 1929 Pioneering Work on Gallium Nitride p-n Junctions and Related Contributions to the Development of Blue Light Emitting Devices[16]
2013   Robert H. Dennard   United States born 1932 Invention of Dynamic Random Access Memory and Proposal of Guidelines for FET Miniaturization[17]
2017 Takashi Mimura [de]   Japan born 1944 Invention of the High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) and Its Development for the Progress of Information and Communications Technology[18]

Biotechnology and medical technologyEdit

Year Laureate Country
1986 Nicole Marthe Le Douarin   France born 1930 Outstanding Contribution to Embryology through the Development of the Technology for Making Chicken/Quail Chimeras[19]
1990   Sydney Brenner   United Kingdom 1927–2019 Pioneering Contribution to Molecular Biology through Demonstration of Messenger RNA and Establishment of C. Elegans as an Experimental System for Developmental Biology[20]
1994   Paul Christian Lauterbur   United States 1929–2007 Proposal of the Basic Principles and Outstanding Contribution to the Development of MRI that Confers a Great Benefit on Clinical Medicine[21]
1998   Kurt Wüthrich    Switzerland born 1938 Outstanding Contribution to Biology through the Expansion of the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy to the Structure Analyses of Biological Macromolecules in Water Solution, an Environment Similar to That in the Living Cell[22]
2002   Leroy Edward Hood   United States born 1938 Contributions to life sciences through the automation of protein and DNA sequencing and synthesis[23]
2006   Leonard Herzenberg   United States 1931–2013 Outstanding contribution to life sciences with the development of a flow cytometer that uses fluorescent-labeled monoclonal antibodies[24]
2010   Shinya Yamanaka   Japan born 1962 Development of Technology for Generating Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) Cells[25]
2014   Robert S. Langer   United States born 1948 Creation of Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery System Technologies[26]
2018 Karl Deisseroth   United States born 1971 Discovery of Optogenetics and Development of Causal Systems Neuroscience[27]

Materials science and engineeringEdit

Year Laureate Country
1987 Morris Cohen   United States 1911–2005 Fundamental Contribution to Development of New Materials Based on Creation of Broad and Basic Insights into the Metal Phase Transformation and Structure-Property Relationship[28]
1991 Michael Szwarc   United States 1909–2000 Pioneering Contribution to Research and Development of Polymeric Materials by Discovering "Living Polymerization"[29]
1995 George William Gray   United Kingdom 1926–2013 Fundamental Contribution to Research and Development of Liquid Crystal Materials by Establishing the Practical Molecular Design Methods[30]
1999 W. David Kingery   United States 1926–2000 Fundamental Contribution to Development of the Ceramics Science and Technology Based on the Physicochemical Theory[31]
2003   George McClelland Whitesides   United States born 1939 Contributions to Nanomaterials Science through the Development of Organic Molecular Self-Assembly Technique[32]
2007 Hiroo Inokuchi [de]   Japan 1927–2014 Pioneering and Fundamental Contributions to Organic Molecular Electronics[33]
2011   John Werner Cahn   United States 1928–2016 Outstanding Contribution to Alloy Materials Engineering by the Establishment of Spinodal Decomposition Theory[34]
2015 Toyoki Kunitake [de]   Japan born 1936 Pioneering Contributions to the Materials Sciences by Discovering Synthetic Bilayer Membranes and Creating the Field of Chemistry Based on Molecular Self-Assembly[35]
2019 Ching W. Tang []   China

  United States

born 1947 Pioneering Contributions to the Birth of High-Efficiency Organic Light-Emitting Diodes and Their Applications.[36]

Information scienceEdit

Year Laureate Country
1988   John McCarthy   United States 1927–2011 Fundamental Contribution to the Field of Artificial Intelligence and the Invention of LISP, a Programming Language[37]
1992   Maurice Vincent Wilkes   United Kingdom 1913–2010 Building and Designing the First Practical Stored Program Computer and Pioneering Studies of Computer Architecture[38]
1996   Donald Ervin Knuth   United States born 1938 Outstanding Contribution to Various Fields of the Computer Science Ranging from the Art of Computer Programming to the Development of Epoch-Making Electronic Publishing Tools[39]
2000   Antony Hoare   United Kingdom born 1934 Pioneering and Fundamental Contributions to the Progress of Software Science[40]
2004   Alan Curtis Kay   United States born 1940 Creation of the concept of modern personal computing and contribution to its realization[41]
2008   Richard M. Karp   United States born 1935 Fundamental Contributions to the Development of the Theory of Computational Complexity[42]
2012   Ivan Edward Sutherland   United States born 1938 Pioneering Achievements in the Development of Computer Graphics and Interactive Interfaces[43]
2016   Takeo Kanade   Japan born 1945 Pioneering Contributions, both Theoretical and Practical, to Computer Vision and Robotics[44]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Rudolf Emil Kalman". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  2. ^ "Kyoto Prize honors achievement and character". USA Today. 11 November 2006. Retrieved 1 January 2013.
  3. ^ "John Cahn to Receive 2011 Kyoto Prize For Fundamental Contributions to Materials Science". National Institute of Standards and Technology. Retrieved 1 January 2013.
  4. ^ born in Budapest, Hungary
  5. ^ "Rudolf Emil Kalman". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  6. ^ "Amos Edward Joel, Jr". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  7. ^ "Jack St. Clair Kilby". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  8. ^ "Stanley Mazor". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  9. ^ "Marcian Edward Hoff, Jr". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  10. ^ "Federico Faggin". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  11. ^ "Masatoshi Shima". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  12. ^ "Morton B. Panish". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  13. ^ "Izuo Hayashi". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  14. ^ "Zhores Ivanovich Alferov". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  15. ^ "George H. Heilmeier". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  16. ^ "Isamu Akasaki". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  17. ^ "Robert Heath Dennard". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  18. ^ "Takashi Mimura". Archived from the original on 2018-07-30. Retrieved 2017-06-16.
  19. ^ "Nicole Marthe Le Douarin". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  20. ^ "Sydney Brenner". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  21. ^ "Paul Christian Lauterbur". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  22. ^ "Kurt Wüthrich". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  23. ^ "Leroy Edward Hood". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  24. ^ "Leonard Arthur Herzenberg". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  25. ^ "Shinya Yamanaka". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  26. ^ "Robert Samuel Langer". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  27. ^ "Karl Deisseroth". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2018-06-15.
  28. ^ "Morris Cohen". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  29. ^ "Michael Szwarc". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  30. ^ "George William Gray". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  31. ^ "W. David Kingery". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  32. ^ "George McClelland Whitesides". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  33. ^ "Hiroo Inokuchi". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  34. ^ "John Werner Cahn". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  35. ^ "Toyoki Kunitake". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  36. ^ Ching W. Tang
  37. ^ "John McCarthy". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  38. ^ "Maurice Vincent Wilkes". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  39. ^ "Donald Ervin Knuth". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  40. ^ "Antony Hoare". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  41. ^ "Alan Curtis Kay". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  42. ^ "Richard Manning Karp". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  43. ^ "Ivan Edward Sutherland". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.
  44. ^ "Takeo Kanade". Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 2016-10-15.