Kitchener Centre

Kitchener Centre (French: Kitchener-Centre) is a federal electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada since 1997.

Kitchener Centre
Ontario electoral district
KitchenerCentre.png
Kitchener Centre in relation to Southern Ontario ridings
Federal electoral district
LegislatureHouse of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Mike Morrice
Green
District created1996
First contested1997
Last contested2021
District webpageprofile, map
Demographics
Population (2016)[1]105,258
Electors (2019)83,884
Area (km²)[2]41.47
Pop. density (per km²)2,538.2
Census division(s)Waterloo
Census subdivision(s)Kitchener

GeographyEdit

The district includes the north-central and north-eastern parts of the city of Kitchener, Ontario, including the downtown core.

Political geographyEdit

In 2008, the race in Kitchener was razor thin between the Conservatives and Liberals. Politically, the riding is split by the Conestoga Parkway. The area to the west of the Parkway tends to support the Liberals while the area to the east of the Parkway tends to vote for the Conservatives. The NDP also won a small handful of polls, scattered around the riding.[3] In 2019, The Greens saw one of their largest increases as their voteshare jumped up 23% from 3 to 26 percent, and stealing second place from the Conservatives. In terms of voteshare and margin of loss, this was the Green's most successful result in Ontario (even better than neighbouring Guelph, which has a Green MLA) and part of their surge in the South West of the province. In 2021, despite a nationwide vote collapse for the Greens, returning candidate Mike Morrice was able to pull off an upset win, largely helped by the collapse in support for the imcumbent Liberal MP, Raj Saini, being involved in sexual assault allgations. This makes the Morrice the first ever Green MP from Ontario on the federal level.

DemographicsEdit

According to the Canada 2016 Census[4]

Ethnic groups: 81.0% White, 4.1% Black, 2.8% South Asian, 2.2% Indigenous, 2.1% Latin American, 1.9% Southeast Asian, 1.6% Arab, 1.4% Chinese
Languages: 75.4% English, 2.6% German, 1.7% Serbian, 1.7% French, 1.6% Arabic, 1.3% Romanian, 1.2% Portuguese, 1.1% Polish
Religions (2011): 66.1% Christian (27.4% Catholic, 6.3% Lutheran, 5.4% United Church, 4.0% Christian Orthodox, 3.6% Anglican, 3.1% Presbyterian, 2.5% Baptist, 2.2% Pentecostal 11.7% Other), 3.9% Muslim, 1.3% Buddhist, 26.5% None.[5]
Median income: $32,546 (2015)
Average income: $40,904 (2015)

HistoryEdit

The electoral district was created in 1996 from parts of Kitchener and Kitchener—Waterloo ridings.

It initially consisted of the part of the City of Kitchener bounded on the west by the western limit of the city, on the south by a line drawn from west to east along the Conestoga Parkway, Strasburg Road, Block Line Road, the Canadian Pacific Railway line, and Highway No. 8, on the east by the Grand River, and on the north by a line drawn from east to west along Victoria Street, Lawrence Avenue and Highland Road West.

In 2003, it was redefined to consist of the part of the City of Kitchener bounded on the west by the western limit of the city, on the north by a line drawn from west to east along Highland Road West, Fischer Hallman Road and the Canadian National Railway situated northerly of Shadeland Crescent, on the east by the Grand River, and on the south by a line drawn from east to west along the King Street Bypass (Highway No. 8), King Street East and the Conestoga Parkway.

This riding lost territory to Kitchener—Conestoga and Kitchener South—Hespeler, and gained territory from Kitchener—Waterloo during the 2012 electoral redistribution.

Member of ParliamentEdit

This riding has elected the following Member of Parliament:

Parliament Years Member Party
Kitchener Centre
Riding created from Kitchener and Kitchener—Waterloo
36th  1997–2000     Karen Redman Liberal
37th  2000–2004
38th  2004–2006
39th  2006–2008
40th  2008–2011     Stephen Woodworth Conservative
41st  2011–2015
42nd  2015–2019     Raj Saini Liberal
43rd  2019–2021
44th  2021–present     Mike Morrice Green

Election resultsEdit

Graph of election results in Kitchener Centre (minor parties that never got 2% of the vote or didn't run consistently are omitted)
2021 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Green Mike Morrice 17,872 34.9 +8.9 none listed
Conservative Mary Henein Thorn 12,537 24.5 +0.5 none listed
New Democratic Beisan Zubi 8,938 17.5 +6.2 none listed
Liberal Raj Saini[a] 8,297 16.2 -20.5 none listed
People's Diane Boskovic 3,381 6.6 +4.7 none listed
Animal Protection Ellen Papenburg 154 0.3 +0 none listed
Total valid votes 51,179 98.81 -0.36
Total rejected ballots 525 1.02 +0.19
Turnout 51,275 62.41
Eligible voters 82,159
Green gain from Liberal Swing +9.28
Source: Elections Canada[6]
  1. ^ Saini withdrew his candidacy, but after closure of nominations, so remained listed as the Liberal candidate on the ballot.
2019 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Raj Saini 20,316 36.69 -12.09 $71,251.01
Green Mike Morrice 14,394 25.99 +22.94 $72,289.70
Conservative Stephen Woodworth 13,191 23.82 -6.54 $86,969.26
New Democratic Andrew Moraga 6,238 11.27 -5.34 $15,354.69
People's Patrick Bernier 1,033 1.87 none listed
Animal Protection Ellen Papenburg 202 0.36 none listed
Total valid votes/expense limit 55,374 99.17 -0.28  
Total rejected ballots 465 0.83 +0.28
Turnout 55,839 66.57 -0.93
Eligible voters 83,884
Liberal hold Swing -17.52
Source: Elections Canada[7][8]
2015 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Raj Saini 25,504 48.78 +16.49 $101,034.78
Conservative Stephen Woodworth 15,872 30.36 -10.00 $127,440.14
New Democratic Susan Cadell 8,680 16.60 -5.32 $56,988.49
Green Nicholas Wendler 1,597 3.05 -1.52 $1,292.98
Libertarian Slavko Miladinovic 515 0.99 $9.05
Marxist–Leninist Julian Ichim 112 0.21
Total valid votes/Expense limit 52,280 99.44   $209,737.44
Total rejected ballots 292 0.56
Turnout 52,572 67.50
Eligible voters 77,887
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +13.25
Source: Elections Canada[9][10]
2011 federal election redistributed results[11][12]
Party Vote %
  Conservative 18,967 40.36
  Liberal 15,175 32.29
  New Democratic 10,305 21.93
  Green 2,152 4.58
  Others 396 0.84
2011 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Stephen Woodworth 21,119 42.40 +5.70 $84,217.49
Liberal Karen Redman 15,592 31.30 -4.64 $79,800.33
New Democratic Peter Thurley 10,742 21.57 +3.48 $38,822.94
Green Byron Williston 1,972 3.96 -4.55 $4,298.33
Independent Alan Rimmer 199 0.40 $1,916.45
Communist Martin Suter 93 0.19 -0.10 $502.09
Marxist–Leninist Mark Corbiere 92 0.18 none listed
Total valid votes/Expense limit 49,809 99.58 $87,274.51
Total rejected ballots 209 0.42 +0.01
Turnout 50,018 63.15 +5.12
Eligible voters 80,480
Conservative hold Swing +5.17
2008 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Stephen Woodworth 16,480 36.69 +4.56 $75,291
Liberal Karen Redman 16,141 35.94 -7.32 $74,745
New Democratic Oz Cole-Arnal 8,152 18.08 -0.35 $26,622
Green John Bithell 3,818 8.51 +2.89 $2,612
Independent Amanda Lamka 215 0.47
Communist Martin Suter 127 0.28 -0.26 $373
Total valid votes/Expense limit 44,933 100.00 $84,756
Total rejected ballots 183 0.41 -0.05
Turnout 45,091 57.03 -7.67
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +5.94
2006 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Karen Redman 21,715 43.26 -3.8
Conservative Steven Cage 16,131 32.13 +4.6
New Democratic Richard Walsh-Bowers 9,250 18.43 -0.9
Green Tony Maas 2,822 5.62 +0.2
Communist Martin Suter 274 0.54
Total valid votes 50,192 100.00
Total rejected ballots 232 0.46
Turnout 50,426 64.70
2004 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Karen Redman 21,264 47.1 -5.7
Conservative Thomas Ichim 12,412 27.5 -12.4[a]
New Democratic Richard Walsh-Bowers 8,717 19.3 +12.4
Green Karol Vesely 2,450 5.4
Independent Mark Corbiere 277 0.6
Total valid votes 45,120 100.0
  1. ^ Conservative vote is compared to the total of the Canadian Alliance vote and Progressive Conservative vote in 2000 election.
2000 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Karen Redman 23,511 52.8 +4.8
Alliance Eloise Jantzi 11,603 26.1 +6.2[a]
Progressive Conservative Steven Daniel Gadbois 6,162 13.8 -8.9
New Democratic Paul Royston 3,058 6.9 -2.5
Communist Martin Suter 167 0.4
Total valid votes 44,501 100.0
  1. ^ Canadian Alliance vote is compared to the Reform vote in 1997 election.
1997 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes %
Liberal Karen Redman 23,089 48.0
Progressive Conservative John Reimer 10,960 22.8
Reform Ronald Albert Wilson 9,550 19.9
New Democratic Lucy Harrison 4,503 9.4
Total valid votes 48,102 100.0

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • "(Code 35037) Census Profile". 2011 census. Statistics Canada. 2012. Retrieved March 3, 2011.
  • Federal riding history from the Library of Parliament
  • 2001 Results from Elections Canada
  • Campaign expense data from Elections Canada

NotesEdit

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 43°27′22″N 80°28′46″W / 43.4562°N 80.4794°W / 43.4562; -80.4794