Kinako (黄粉 or きなこ), also known as roasted soybean flour,[1] is a product commonly used in Japanese cuisine. In English, it is usually called "roasted soy flour". More precisely it is "roasted whole soy flour".[2][3] Usage of the word kinako appeared in cookbooks from the late Muromachi period (1336–1573).[4] Kinako means "yellow flour" in Japanese.

Kinako

ProductionEdit

Kinako is produced by finely grinding roasted soybeans into powder.[4][5] The skin of the soybean is typically removed before pulverizing the beans, but some varieties of kinako retain the roasted skin.[5] Yellow soybeans produce a yellow kinako, and green soybeans produce a light-green product.[5] Kinako, being composed of soybeans, is a healthy topping and flavouring which contains B vitamins and protein.[5] Compared to boiled soybeans, however, the protein in kinako is not easily digested.[5]

UsageEdit

 
Japanese dango sweets covered in kinako soybean flour

Kinako is widely used in Japanese cooking, but is strongly associated with dango and wagashi. Dango, dumplings made from mochiko (rice flour), are commonly coated with kinako.[6] Examples include ohagi and Abekawa-mochi. Kinako, when combined with milk or soy milk, can also be made into a drink. One example of its use in popular foods is warabimochi, which is a famous kinako-covered sweet.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Kinako" [Progressive Japanese-English Dictionary]. Puroguresshibu Waei Chūjiten [プログレッシブ和英中辞典]. Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2012-06-26.
  2. ^ Shurtleff, William; Aoyagi, Akiko. 1975. The Book of Tofu: Food for Mankind. Hayama-shi, Kanagawa-ken, Japan: Autumn Press. 336 p. See p. 64–66.
  3. ^ Shurtleff, W.; Aoyagi, A. 2012. History of Roasted Whole Soy Flour (Kinako), Soy Coffee, and Soy Chocolate (1540–2012). Lafayette, California: Soyinfo Center. 709 pp. (1,420 references; 76 photos and illustrations. Free online)
  4. ^ a b "Kinako". Nihon Kokugo Daijiten (日本国語大辞典) (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2012-05-26.
  5. ^ a b c d e "Kinako". Nihon Daihyakka Zensho (Nipponika) (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2012-05-26.
  6. ^ Wagashi, traditional Japanese confections, also make extensive use of a mixture of kinako and sugar."Kinako". Dijitaru daijisen (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2012-05-26.

External linksEdit

  • [1] History of Roasted Whole Soy Flour (Kinako), Soy Coffee, and Soy Chocolate (2012)