Kathryn Schulz

Kathryn Schulz is an American journalist and author. She is a staff writer at The New Yorker.[1] In 2016, she won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing for her article on the risk of a major earthquake and tsunami in the Pacific Northwest[2]

Kathryn Schulz
Schulz in 2010
Schulz in 2010
BornShaker Heights, Ohio
OccupationJournalist
GenreNon-fiction
Notable awardsThe Pulitzer Prize

BiographyEdit

Schulz was born and raised in Shaker Heights, Ohio. Schulz is the daughter of teacher Margot Schulz and lawyer Isaac Schulz.[3] Her sister is Laura Schulz. She graduated from Brown University in 1996.[4]

 
Schulz in 2010

In 2015, Schulz became a staff writer for The New Yorker, where she has written about everything from the legacy of an early Muslim immigrant in Wyoming[5] to the radical life of civil rights activist Pauli Murray[6] to Henry David Thoreau's Walden[7] to brown marmorated stinkbugs.[8] In 2016, she won the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing and a National Magazine Award for “The Really Big One,”[9] her story on seismic risk in the Pacific Northwest.

Previously, she was the book critic for New York, the editor of the environmental magazine Grist, and a reporter and editor at the Santiago Times.

She is the author of the book “Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error.” Her second book, “Lost & Found,” will be published by Random House in 2022.[10]

Schulz was a 2004 recipient of the Pew Fellowship in International Journalism (now the International Reporting Project), and has reported from throughout Central and South America, Japan and the Middle East.[11]

Reviews and HonorsEdit

Reviewing her book Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error (2010), Dwight Garner wrote: "Ms. Schulz's book is a funny and philosophical meditation on why error is mostly a humane, courageous and extremely desirable human trait. She flies high in the intellectual skies, leaving beautiful sunlit contrails."[12] Daniel Gilbert described her as "a warm, witty and welcome presence who confides in her readers rather than lecturing them. It doesn't hurt that she combines lucid prose with perfect comic timing."[13]

In 2016, Schulz won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Magazine Award for "The Really Big One,"[14] an article about seismic risk in the Pacific Northwest. She was also a finalist for the 2017 National Magazine Award for "When Things Go Missing,"[15] an essay about loss and the death of her father.

Her writing has appeared in The Best American Essays, The Best American Travel Writing, The Best American Food Writing, and The Best American Science Writing.

BibliographyEdit

BooksEdit

  • Schulz, Kathryn (2010). Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error. Ecco/HarperCollins. ISBN 9780061176043.
  • Schulz, Kathryn (2022). Lost & Found: A Memoir. Random House. ISBN 978-0-525-51247-9.

Essays and reportingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Contributors: Kathryn Schulz", The New Yorker.
  2. ^ "The 2016 Pulitzer Prize Winner in Feature Writing: Kathryn Schulz of The New Yorker". Columbia University. 2016. Retrieved November 7, 2016.
  3. ^ "ISAAC SCHULZ's Obituary". The Plain Dealer. 2016-09-20.
  4. ^ Center, Julianne (2016-04-26). "In conversation: Kathryn Schulz '96". Brown Daily Herald. Retrieved 2021-04-13.
  5. ^ Schulz, Kathryn. "The Old West's Muslim Tamale King". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2021-04-12.
  6. ^ Schulz, Kathryn. "The Civil-Rights Luminary You've Never Heard Of". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2021-04-13.
  7. ^ Schulz, Kathryn. "Why Do We Love Henry David Thoreau?". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2021-04-13.
  8. ^ Schulz, Kathryn. "When Twenty-Six Thousand Stinkbugs Invade Your Home". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2021-04-13.
  9. ^ Schulz, Kathryn. "The Earthquake That Will Devastate the Pacific Northwest". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2021-04-13.
  10. ^ Schulz, Kathryn (2022). Lost & Found: A Memoir. Random House. ISBN 978-0-525-51247-9.
  11. ^ "Why Should We Embrace Regret?". TED Radio Hour. NPR. May 2, 2012. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  12. ^ Dwight Garner, "To Err Is Human. And How! And Why", The New York Times, June 10, 2010.
  13. ^ Daniel Gilbert, "The Errors of Our Ways", The New York Times, Sunday Book Review, July 23, 2010
  14. ^ Schulz, Kathryn. "The Earthquake That Will Devastate the Pacific Northwest". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2021-04-13.
  15. ^ Schulz, Kathryn. "When Things Go Missing". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2021-04-13.

External linksEdit