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Kaslo is a village in the West Kootenay region of British Columbia, Canada, located on the west shore of Kootenay Lake. Known for its natural environment,[citation needed] it is a member municipality of the Central Kootenay Regional District. As of 2016, it had a population of 968.[2]

Kaslo
Village
Village of Kaslo[1]
Kaslo after 1957 with Moyie at bottom left
Kaslo after 1957 with Moyie at bottom left
Coat of arms of Kaslo
Coat of arms
Motto(s): Industry Progress Wealth
Kaslo is located in British Columbia
Kaslo
Kaslo
Location of Kaslo in British Columbia
Coordinates: 49°54′48″N 116°54′41″W / 49.91333°N 116.91139°W / 49.91333; -116.91139Coordinates: 49°54′48″N 116°54′41″W / 49.91333°N 116.91139°W / 49.91333; -116.91139
Country  Canada
Province  British Columbia
Region Kootenays
Regional District Central Kootenay
Government
 • Mayor Suzan Hewat
 • Governing body Kaslo Village Council
- Romella Glorioso
- Robert Lang
- Kellie Knoll
- Jimmy Holland
 • MP Wayne Stetski (NDP)
 • MLA Michelle Mungall (NDP)
Area
 • Land 3.01 km2 (1.16 sq mi)
Elevation 591 m (1,939 ft)
Population (2016)[2]
 • Total 968
 • Density 321.9/km2 (834/sq mi)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
Postal code span V0G 1M0
Area code(s) 250 / 778 / 236
Highways Hwy 31
Hwy 31A
Waterway Kootenay Lake
Website Village of Kaslo

Kaslo was designated as a sawmill site in 1889, and expanded due to the silver boom of the late19th century. It retains much of the historic atmosphere from its earlier mining days. The town today relies mainly on the industries of forestry and tourism.

Contents

HistoryEdit

 
Kaslo, 1900

Kaslo was incorporated as a city on August 14, 1893, making it the oldest incorporated community in the Kootenays.

It was an important center for shipping and silver ore mining.[3]

After the silver rush Kaslo's fortunes faded but it was re-incorporated as a village on January 1, 1959.

National Historic SitesEdit

Kaslo is home to two National Historic Sites of Canada:

  • The SS Moyie, which worked on Kootenay Lake from 1889 until 1957, found a permanent home on Front Street in Kaslo. Beautifully restored by the Kootenay Lake Historical Society, it is the oldest intact sternwheeler in the world and draws thousands of visitors every year.[4]
  • Village Hall, built in 1898, is one of only two intact wooden municipal buildings that are still in use in Canada.

AttractionsEdit

  • The Kaslo Canada Day Folk Music Festival: Celebrate the Canada Day long weekend at Front Street Park in Kaslo with the annual Kaslo Canada Day Folk Music Festival.
  • The Kaslo Jazz Etc. Festival, held every August long weekend in Kaslo Bay Park, is a music event which attracts international performers and draws large audiences. [1]
  • The Kaslo Golf Club is a 9-hole course which plays as a 2,824-yard, men's par 35, women's par 37 course. Kaslo's Golf Club dates back to 1923, when locals invested and donated their efforts and created a 4-hole course. This makes it one of the oldest in British Columbia.[citation needed] A new timberframe clubhouse was built in 2007.

Japanese internmentEdit

In 1941, Kaslo was selected as one of many sites throughout BC for the internment of Japanese Canadians.

TelevisionEdit

Kaslo has been featured on the historical television series Gold Trails and Ghost Towns (season 2, episode 2). Kaslo was also featured in the 1995 film Magic in the Water starring Mark Harmon and Joshua Jackson.[5]

ClimateEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "British Columbia Regional Districts, Municipalities, Corporate Name, Date of Incorporation and Postal Address" (XLS). British Columbia Ministry of Communities, Sport and Cultural Development. Archived from the original on July 13, 2014. Retrieved November 2, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b Statistics Canada. "2016 Census Statistics for Kaslo, British Columbia". Retrieved 2007-07-03. 
  3. ^ Kaslo.ca. "Kaslo history". Retrieved 2007-07-03. 
  4. ^ Kootenay Lake Historical Society. "SS Moyie National Historic Site". Retrieved 2007-07-02. 
  5. ^ http://www.sonymoviechannel.com/movies/magic-in-water/details
  6. ^ "Calculation Information for 1981 to 2010 Canadian Normals Data". Environment Canada. Archived from the original on June 14, 2013. Retrieved July 9, 2013. 

External linksEdit