Kabloonak (Inuit for "White Person", "non-Inuit") is a Canadian drama film, directed by Claude Massot and released in 1994.[1]

Kabloonak
Kabloonak.jpg
Directed byClaude Massot
Produced byGeorges Benayoun
Pierre Gendron
Written byClaude Massot
Sebastian Regnier
StarringCharles Dance
Adamie Inukpuk
Bernard Bloch
Natar Ungalaaq
Music bySebastian Regnier
CinematographyFrançois Protat
Jacques Loiseleux
Edited byJoelle Hache
Claire Pinheiro
Release date
  • August 25, 1994 (1994-08-25) (MWFF)
Running time
103 minutes
CountryCanada
LanguageEnglish

PlotEdit

The film is about the making of Nanook of the North, a 1922 film about an Inuk called Nanook and his family in the Canadian Arctic.

CastEdit

The film's cast includes Charles Dance as Robert J. Flaherty, Adamie Inukpuk as Nanook, Bernard Bloch as Thierry Malet, and Natar Ungalaaq as Mukpullu.[2]

ProductionEdit

LocationsEdit

The film was shot in Siberia and the Northwest Territories.[3]

ReleaseEdit

It premiered at the Montreal World Film Festival in August 1994,[3] and was released theatrically on September 16, 1994 in Canada.[1]

AwardsEdit

François Protat received a Genie Award nomination for Best Cinematography at the 15th Genie Awards in 1994 for his work on the film.[4]

Charles Dance won the award for "Best Actor" at the Paris Film Festival 1994 for this film, and Claude Massot was awarded a "Special Jury Prize". At the Montréal World Film Festival 1994, Jacques Loiseleux won for "Best Artistic Contribution", and François Protat for "Photography". At the Gijón International Film Festival 1994, Claude Massot won three awards, for "Best Director", the "Grand Prix Asturias" (for "Best Feature"), and a "Special Prize of the Young Jury".

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Kabloonak captures the North". Montreal Gazette, September 16, 1994.
  2. ^ "A filmmaker' s life without its riches". The Globe and Mail, November 25, 1994.
  3. ^ a b "New movie recalls 1922 cinema classic Nanook of the North". Canadian Press, August 25, 1994.
  4. ^ "Genie Award nominations". Toronto Star, October 20, 1994.

External linksEdit