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Justice at Stake was a judicial advocacy organization active in the United States from 2000 to 2017. The group advocated for an end to judicial elections, and for stricter regulations regarding campaign finance for state-level judicial races.[2] George Soros was one of the organization's primary donors.[3][4][5]

Justice at Stake
Justice at Stake logo
Founded2000[1]
DissolvedJune 16, 2017
FocusJudiciary
Location
Key people
Mark I. Harrison, Chair of the Board; Bert Brandenberg, Executive Director
Websitewww.justiceatstake.org

The organization's stated mission was to "help Americans keep courts fair and impartial."[6]

BackgroundEdit

Founded in 2000, Justice at Stake was a 501(c)(3) organization governed by a board of directors. The chair of the board was Mark I. Harrison. The organization announced its closure on June 16, 2017.[7]

Justice at Stake advocated for judicial appointments rather than judicial elections. It also advocated for reforms such as public financing of judicial elections and stricter campaign finance regulations regarding state judicial races.[8]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Mauro, Tony (April 29, 2015). "Supreme Court's 'Yulee' Decision: A Turning Point on Judicial Elections?". National Law Journal. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  2. ^ Oliphant, James (October 18, 2014). "When Judges Go Courting". National Journal. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  3. ^ "Judges, Politics and George Soros". Wall Street Journal. March 31, 2013. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  4. ^ Pero, Dan (September 10, 2010). "George Soros vs. judicial elections". Washington Times. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  5. ^ Newlin Carney, Eliza (October 4, 2010). "The Perils Of Big Money In Judicial Elections". National Journal. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  6. ^ "Our Mission". Justice at Stake. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  7. ^ Liss, Susan (June 16, 2017). "Justice at Stake Closing Its Doors After 16 Years". Justice at Stake. Retrieved 19 June 2017.
  8. ^ Johnson, Carrie (August 16, 2010). "Report: Too Much Money Going To State Court Races". NPR. Retrieved 29 May 2015.