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Judith A. Miller is an American attorney and government official who served as General Counsel of the United States Department of Defense from 1994 to 1999, and in the private sector as general counsel for Bechtel Group.

Judith A. Miller
Judith Miller DoD.jpg
General Counsel of the Department of Defense
In office
September 29, 1994 – November 7, 1999
PresidentBill Clinton
Preceded byJamie Gorelick
Succeeded byDouglas A. Dworkin
Personal details
NationalityUnited States
Spouse(s)Peter Buscemi
Alma materBeloit College (B.A.)
Yale Law School (J.D.)
OccupationLawyer, government official
Known forExpert on international and contract law

Contents

BiographyEdit

Miller grew up in Ohio and studied at Beloit College, where she received a B.A. summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa in 1972.[1][2] She attended Yale Law School, serving as an editor of the Yale Law Journal, and graduating with a J.D. in 1975.[3] After law school, she clerked for Judge Harold Leventhal of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, and then for United States Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart in 1976-1977.[4][5] Following her clerkships, from September 1977 to February 1979 she was Assistant to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary of Defense in the U.S. Department of Defense.[6] Afterwards, she practiced law from 1979 at Williams & Connolly in Washington, D.C., where she was named a partner in 1985.[7] She focused on litigation of defense contractor and corporate disputes, and criminal defense.[8]

Miller served as General Counsel of the United States Department of Defense from September 29, 1994 to November 7, 1999, during the tenure of William Cohen as Secretary of Defense.[9][10][11][12] In recognition of her work, she received the Department of Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service. In January 2008, she was considered for the post of head of the Department of Veterans Affairs.[13] After stepping down from public service, she returned to Williams & Connolly for six years. Then, from 2006 to 2010, she was general counsel and senior vice president of Bechtel Group, an international construction company.[14]

Since 1992, Miller has served as a member of American Law Institute, and in 2010 was elected to the governing council.[15] Her research interests include ethics and foreign relations. Among her honors, she was named by the Women’s Bar Association of the District of Columbia as its "2006 Woman Lawyer of the Year."[16]

Personal lifeEdit

She is married to Peter Buscemi, who was a partner at Morgan Lewis specializing in Supreme Court appeals.[17]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Donor Stories: Judith Miller, '72". Beloit College. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  2. ^ "Donor Stories: Judith Miller '72 And Peter Buscemi". Beloit College. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  3. ^ "Masthead, Board of Editors". Yale Law Journal. 1975. p. 1315. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  4. ^ Estreicher, Samuel (1980). "Pragmatic Justice: The Contribution of Harold Leventhal to Administrative Law". Columbia Law Review. 80 (5): 894–930. doi:10.2307/1122090. JSTOR 1122090.
  5. ^ Peppers, Todd C. (2006). Courtiers of the Marble Palace: The Rise and Influence of the Supreme Court Law Clerk. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press. p. 232. ISBN 9780804753821.
  6. ^ "Memorandum for the Special Assistant to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary of Defense, Judith A. Miller" (PDF). U.S. National Security Agency. August 9, 1978. Retrieved April 19, 2019.
  7. ^ Kiernan, Laurie A. (April 26, 1982). "Defense Headed By a Bulldog With a Bark". Washington Post. Retrieved April 19, 2019.
  8. ^ Taylor Jr., Stuart (June 16, 1982). "Hinckley Stirred to an Outburst". New York Times. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  9. ^ Kamen, Al (May 25, 1994). "How to Cross the Finnish Line". Washington Post. Retrieved April 19, 2019.
  10. ^ Myers, Steven Lee (July 21, 1998). "Cohen Hopes for Standard Adultery Policy Soon". New York Times. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  11. ^ "National Defense Authorization Act of 1997, House Report 104-563, Letter of Judith A. Miller to Speaker of the House". Congressional Record. U.S. Government Printing Office. 104th Congress, 2nd Session. May 7, 1996. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  12. ^ "National Defense Authorization Act of 1998, House Report 105-132, Letter of Judith A. Miller to Speaker of the House". Congressional Record. U.S. Government Printing Office. 105th Congress, 1st Session. June 16, 1997. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  13. ^ Kamen, Al (January 28, 2008). "Dogging the Wag". Washington Post. Retrieved April 19, 2019.
  14. ^ "Judith Miller Named to ABA Ethics Commission". Bechtel Group. August 5, 2009. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  15. ^ "Donor Spotlight: Judith A. Miller and Peter Buscemi" (PDF). The ALI Reporter. Fall 2017. p. 10. Retrieved April 19, 2019.
  16. ^ "Bar Happenings: Miller Named Woman Lawyer of the Year". DC Bar -- Washington Lawyer. May 2006. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  17. ^ "Profile for Peter Buscemi". Oyez.org. Retrieved April 19, 2019.

Select articlesEdit

External linksEdit

  • Appearances on C-SPAN
  • Bio, Bloomberg
  • Bio, Markle Foundation
  • Bio, Section on Professional Responsibility, American Bar Association