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Jose Trevino (born November 28, 1992) is an American professional baseball catcher for the Texas Rangers of Major League Baseball (MLB).

Jose Trevino
Texas Rangers – No. 71
Catcher
Born: (1992-11-28) November 28, 1992 (age 26)
Corpus Christi, Texas
Bats: Right Throws: Right
MLB debut
June 15, 2018, for the Texas Rangers
MLB statistics
(through 2018 Season)
Batting average.250
Home runs0
Runs batted in3
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Contents

Professional careerEdit

Trevino attended St. John Paul II High School in Corpus Christi, Texas and played college baseball at Oral Roberts University. He was drafted by the Texas Rangers in the sixth round of the 2014 Major League Baseball Draft.[1]

Trevino made his professional debut with the Spokane Indians where he played catcher, third base and second base[2] and batted .257 with nine home runs and 49 RBIs. In 2015, Trevino played for the Hickory Crawdads where he hit .261 with a career high 14 home runs along with 63 RBIs, and became a full-time catcher.[3] After the season, he played in the Arizona Fall League. In 2016, he played for the High Desert Mavericks and won a minor league Gold Glove Award.[4] He posted a .303 batting average, nine home runs, 68 RBIs and a career high .776 OPS for the Mavericks. He played in the Arizona Fall League after the season for the second consecutive year.[5]

Trevino spent 2017 with the Frisco RoughRiders where he posted a .241 average with seven home runs and 42 RBIS.[6] The Rangers added Trevino to their 40-man roster after the 2017 season.[7] He began and finished 2018 with Frisco. In 184 at bats with Frisco, he hit .234/.284/.332/.615 with 3 home runs and 16 RBI.

Texas RangersEdit

Trevino made his major league debut with the Rangers on June 15, 2018, in a game against the Colorado Rockies.[8] On June 16th, 2018, Trevino tied the game 2-2 in the 7th inning with his first major league hit, a RBI single. On June 17, 2018, Trevino delivered his first career walk-off hit, a 2-run single off of Wade Davis, giving Rangers the 13-12 win.[9] Trevino underwent season-ending surgery on his left shoulder on July 20, 2018.[10]

In 2019, Trevino was optioned to the Triple-A Nashville Sounds to open the season.[11]

AwardsEdit

Trevino was awarded the minor leagues' Rawlings Gold Glove Award for catchers, in both 2016 and 2017.[12]

Personal lifeEdit

Trevino has one son, Josiah Cruz Trevino who was born on June 10, 2018, five days before Trevino would make his MLB debut.[13]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Trevino has offensive potential". Retrieved November 19, 2016.
  2. ^ "Indians' Jose Trevino plays position of influence". Retrieved November 19, 2016.
  3. ^ "Rangers' Trevino Heeds Call To Play Catcher - BaseballAmerica.com". February 6, 2016. Retrieved November 19, 2016.
  4. ^ "Pro baseball: Former ORU catcher Jose Trevino wins Minors' Gold Glove". Retrieved November 19, 2016.
  5. ^ "Texas Rangers prospect Jose Trevino does it all in Arizona Fall League win - MiLB.com News - The Official Site of Minor League Baseball". Retrieved November 19, 2016.
  6. ^ "Jose Trevino Stats, Highlights, Bio - MiLB.com Stats - The Official Site of Minor League Baseball". Retrieved December 10, 2017.
  7. ^ "Texas Rangers: Pitchers in forefront as Rangers add to 40-man major-league roster | SportsDay". Sportsday.dallasnews.com. Retrieved February 27, 2018.
  8. ^ Rangers Reaction: Week brings Jose Trevino a baby, big league debut by Stefan Stevenson. Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 15 June 2018. Retrieved 2018-06-16.
  9. ^ "Jose Trevino delivers walk-off hit in 13-12 victory over Rockies". MLB. Retrieved June 17, 2018.
  10. ^ "Jose Trevino done for the season after shoulder surgery". lonestarball.com. July 20, 2018. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  11. ^ "Jose Trevino". mlb.com. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  12. ^ "Pro baseball: Former ORU catcher Jose Trevino wins 2nd Gold Glove". tulsaworld.com. September 20, 2017. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  13. ^ "Rangers rookie Jose Trevino caps emotional Father's Day with walk-off hit". sportingnews.com. June 17, 2018. Retrieved January 23, 2019.

External linksEdit