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Jos Charles (born November 14, 1988) is an American poet, writer, translator, and editor.

BiographyEdit

Charles grew up in a conservative, Evangelical Christian family. She wrote her first poem, about the Crucifixion, when she was seven years old.[1] Charles received a Masters in Fine Arts degree from the University of Arizona.[2]

Charles' debut poetry collection, Safe Space was published in 2016 by Ahsahta Press.[3][4] Her poetry has been published by POETRY, PEN, Washington Square Review, Denver Quarterly, GLAAD, and LAMBDA Literary', The Feminist Wire, Action Yes, BLOOM, and The Capilano Review.[5] In 2015 she received the Monique Wittig Writer's Scholarship.[6]In 2016 Charles received a Ruth Lilly & Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship through the Poetry Foundation and was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award for Transgender Poetry.[7][6][2][8] In 2017 she was the winner of the National Poetry Series.[5][9] On August 14, 2018 their poetry book feeld was published by Milkweed Editions.[1][10][11] She is the founding editor of THEM, the first trans-literary journal in the United States.[5] Charles' writing uses an original vocabulary that is created by blending together Middle English and textspeak.[12][13][14][15][16]

Charles is a transgender woman.[17] As of 2018, she lives in Long Beach, California and attends the University of California Irvine as a PhD candidate in English.[18]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Savard, Molly (14 August 2018). "The Complicated Beauty of Jos Charles' Words". Shondaland. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  2. ^ a b "Jos Charles Archives". Nationalpoetryseries.org. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  3. ^ "Ten Questions for Jos Charles". Poets & Writers. 14 August 2018. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  4. ^ "American Poetry Review - Jos Charles - "Bowl of Oranges: An Interview with Kaveh Akbar"". American Poetry Review. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  5. ^ a b c Foundation, Poetry (3 February 2019). "Jos Charles". Poetry Foundation. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  6. ^ a b "Two Poems by Jos Charles". Lithub.com. 15 August 2018. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  7. ^ "Safe Space". Ahsahtapress.org. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  8. ^ "Jos Charles". Nationalbook.org. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  9. ^ "feeld". Milkweed Editions. 9 April 2018. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  10. ^ "jos charles". Joscharles.com. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  11. ^ "An Invitation to the feeld: an Interview with Jos Charles - Frontier Poetry - A Platform For Emerging Poetry". Frontier Poetry. 12 September 2018. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  12. ^ "Standardizing the Vernacular: Jos Charles Interviewed by S. Yarberry - BOMB Magazine". Bombmagazine.org. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  13. ^ "Jos Charles on "Seagull, Tiny" - Poetry Society of America". Poetrysociety.org. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  14. ^ "Queering Language: 'Feeld' by Jos Charles". Zyzzyva.org. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  15. ^ "To describe the trans experience, this poet created a new dialect". PBS NewsHour. 30 July 2018. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  16. ^ "VIDA Reviews! feeld notes: feeld, by Jos Charles". VIDA: Women in Literary Arts. 26 October 2018. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  17. ^ Charles, Jos (8 January 2018). "Jos Charles - Poet - Academy of American Poets". Poets.org. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  18. ^ Trumpfheller, Brad (30 August 2018). "Groundshift: A Conversation with Jos Charles". The Adroit Journal. Retrieved 3 February 2019.