John M. Landrum

John Morgan Landrum (July 3, 1815 – October 7, 1861) was a Democratic U.S. Representative from Louisiana serving in the 36th Congress. Shortly after Louisiana seceded from the Union in January 1861, Landrum vacated his seat.

Life and careerEdit

Born in Edgefield District, South Carolina, Landrum pursued classical studies at South Carolina College (now the University of South Carolina) at Columbia, graduating in 1842. He taught school for several years as he studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1844 and commenced practice in Shreveport, Louisiana.[1]

Political careerEdit

He served one term as mayor of Shreveport in 1848 and 1849.[1]

Landrum was elected in November 1859 as a Democrat to the 36th Congress, taking 73% of the vote against Opposition Party candidate M.A. Jones.[2] He remained absent from Congress from February 5, 1861, to the end of the 36th Congress following Louisiana's secession from the Union.[1]

Later career and deathEdit

He continued to practice law until his death in Shreveport on October 7, 1861.[3] Two weeks prior to his death, Landrum was involved in a serious buggy accident in which he broke his leg.[4]

He was interred in Oakland Cemetery in Shreveport.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d United States Congress. "John M. Landrum (id: L000053)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. See footnote, page 159, of 2005 print version.
  2. ^ Greeley, Horace; Cleveland, John F. (1860). A Political Text-Book for 1860. New York, New York: The Tribune Association. p. 243. Retrieved 28 April 2021.
  3. ^ "Death of the Hon. John M. Landrum". The Times-Picayune. New Orleans, Louisiana. October 12, 1861. p. 2. Retrieved October 22, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "We deeply regret to learn ..." Shreveport Daily News. Shreveport, Louisiana. September 20, 1861. p. 2. Retrieved October 22, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.

External linksEdit

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Louisiana's 4th congressional district

1859 – 1861
Succeeded by
Vacant due to Civil War