Joe Hill-Gibbins

Joe Hill-Gibbins (born 1977 as Joseph Hill-Gibbins) is a British theatre and opera director.

BackgroundEdit

Hill-Gibbins was born and raised in Surrey. He attended a local comprehensive, George Abbot School, and later read Drama at Manchester University.

CareerEdit

Hill-Gibbins directed his first professional production, Wallace Shawn’s A Thought In Three Parts, at the Battersea Arts Centre as winner of the 2002 James Menzies-Kitchen Trust Award for young directors [1]

He trained at the Royal Court Theatre, both as an assistant director and script reader in the literary office. In 2004 he became Trainee Associate Director at the Royal Court, helping curate the Young Writer’s Festival for which he directed A Girl In A Car With A Man by Rob Evans.

In 2006 Hill-Gibbins joined the staff of the Young Vic theatre. After directing Bertolt Brecht’s one-act comedy A Respectable Wedding in a new translation by Rory Bremner,[2] he became an Associate Director. In 2010 he was appointed Deputy Artistic Director and directed acclaimed productions of Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie[3] and The Beauty Queen of Leenane by Martin McDonagh,[4] which returned to the theatre in 2011.[5]

In 2011 he also directed Penelope Skinner's new play The Village Bike at the Royal Court.[6]

Directing credits includeEdit

  • The Girlfriend Experience by Alecky Blythe (2008 Royal Court and Drum Plymouth, 2009 Young Vic)[14]
  • Family Plays: The Good Family by Joakim Pirinen & The Khomenko Family Chronicles by Natalia Vorozhbit (2007 Royal Court Theatre)
  • A Girl In A Car With A Man by Rob Evans (2004 Royal Court)
  • The One with the Oven by Emma Rosoman (2002 Royal Court)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ [1] "The JMK Trust"
  2. ^ Independent"The Independent" 10 April 2007 Archived 9 March 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ Independent On Sunday "The Independent On Sunday" 19 November 2010
  4. ^ The Guardian "The Guardian" 22 July 2010
  5. ^ London Evening Standard Archived 22 November 2011 at the Wayback Machine "London Evening Standard" 27 July 2011
  6. ^ The Telegraph "The Telegraph" 5 July 2011
  7. ^ almeida.co.uk 30 January 2019
  8. ^ lovetheatre.com "lovetheatre.com" 23 February 2013
  9. ^ The Guardian "The Guardian" 27 November 2012
  10. ^ The Observer "The Observer" 10 July 2011
  11. ^ The Telegraph "The Telegraph" 18 November 2010
  12. ^ New York Times "New York Times" 10 August 2010
  13. ^ The Guardian "The Guardian" 26 July 2011
  14. ^ What's On Stage "What's On Stage" 30 July 2009
  15. ^ Guardian "The Guardian" 4 April 2008
  16. ^ Guardian "The Guardian" 5 April 2007