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Jim Krivacs is a former college basketball player for The University of Texas at Austin. Krivacs transferred to Texas from Auburn and was a three-year starter for the Longhorns under head coach Abe Lemons, beginning in Lemons' first year at Texas.[1] He twice earned All-America honors—as a first-team All-America selection as a junior in 1978 and as a second-team selection in 1979.[2] Krivacs led the Longhorns in scoring as a sophomore and junior and was second in scoring as a senior.[3] He scored an average of 22.0 points per game in 1978 and 19.5 points per game for his three-year Texas career.[4] His career point total and career scoring average remain eighth- and sixth-highest, respectively, in program history.[5] In 1978, Krivacs helped to lead Texas to a 26–5 overall record, a share of the Southwest Conference championship, the 1978 National Invitation Tournament championship, and a final ranking of No. 17 in the Associated Press Poll.[6][7] Along with teammate Ron Baxter, he was named co-MVP of the 1978 NIT.[6][8] As a senior, Krivacs helped to lead the 1979 Longhorns to a 21–8 overall record, a share of the Southwest Conference championship for the second consecutive season, an appearance in the 1979 NCAA Tournament, and a No. 15 final ranking in the Coaches Poll.[7] In 1979, he was the first Texas men's basketball player to receive recognition as a first-team Academic All-American.[9][10] Krivacs was selected in the sixth round of the 1979 NBA draft by the Kansas City Kings.[11]

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. ^ Shugart, Kim (February 14, 1978). "Discipline a problem says ex-Auburn player". The Tuscaloosa News. Retrieved May 8, 2015.
  2. ^ "2014–15 Texas Basketball Fact Book" (PDF). texassports.com. p. 140. Retrieved May 8, 2015.
  3. ^ 2014–15 Texas Basketball Fact Book, p. 135
  4. ^ 2014–15 Texas Basketball Fact Book, p. 114
  5. ^ 2014–15 Texas Basketball Fact Book, p. 113-14
  6. ^ a b Haley, Ish (March 22, 1978). "Funny-Looking Horns Have Last NIT Laugh". Dallas Times Herald.
  7. ^ a b 2014–15 Texas Basketball Fact Book, p. 100
  8. ^ Floriani, Ray (2005). The National Invitation Tournament: Images of Sports. Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia. p. 58. ISBN 0-7385-3904-X.
  9. ^ 2014–15 Texas Basketball Fact Book, p. 139
  10. ^ "Augustin named to ESPN academic team". utexas.edu. March 6, 2008. Retrieved May 8, 2015.
  11. ^ 2014–15 Texas Basketball Fact Book, p. 147