Jim Browning (wrestler)

James Orville Browning (March 31, 1903 – June 19, 1936) was an American professional wrestler.

Jim Browning
Birth nameJames Orville Browning
Born(1903-03-31)March 31, 1903
Verona, Missouri, United States
DiedJune 19, 1936(1936-06-19) (aged 33)
Rochester, Minnesota, United States
Cause of deathPulmonary embolism
Professional wrestling career
Ring name(s)Jim Browning
Young Stecher
Billed height6 ft 2 in (188 cm)[1]
Billed weight225 lb (102 kg)[1]
Debut1923
RetiredFebruary 1936

Professional wrestling careerEdit

Browning was raised on a farm in Missouri.[2] After working in construction and on oil fields, Browning made his debut in professional wrestling in 1923. he went on to work in many territories in the United States and Canada, feuding with wrestlers such as Jim Londos, Joe Stecher, and Ed "Strangler" Lewis.[1]

On February 20, 1933, Browning defeated Ed "Strangler" Lewis for the New York State Athletic Commission World Heavyweight Championship in Madison Square Gardens with an airplane scissors hold. He held the championship for 490 days, during which time he drew large crowds. On June 25, 1934, Browning dropped the title to Jim Londos.[2]

Browning retired from wrestling in February 1936 due to ill health (trachoma, an ulcerated stomach, and liver problems).[3]

DeathEdit

Browning died on June 25, 1936 at the age of 33 from a pulmonary embolism resulting from abdominal surgery.[1][4][5]

Championships and accomplishmentsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d Hornbaker, Tim. "The unknown heavyweight champion of the world - the Turnover Scissors King – Jim Browning". Legacy of Wrestling. Retrieved April 26, 2022.
  2. ^ a b "Jim Browning (1903-1936)". Wrestling Scout. Retrieved April 26, 2022.
  3. ^ "1933 Goudey Sport Kings Jim Browning (wrestling)". Professional Sports Authenticator. Collectors Universe.
  4. ^ "Jim Browning dies; ex-mat champion". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Associated Press. June 20, 1936. p. 11. Retrieved April 26, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "Death of ex-wrestling champion". The Courier-Mail. Brisbane. June 22, 1936. p. 14 – via Trove.
  6. ^ Kreikenbohm, Philip. "Los Angeles World Heavyweight Championship". Cagematch.net. Retrieved April 26, 2022.
  7. ^ Kreikenbohm, Philip. "NYSAC World Heavyweight Championship". Cagematch.net. Retrieved April 26, 2022.

External linksEdit