Jhyali (Nepali: झ्याली) is a traditional folk percussion instrument from Nepal. They are thinly walled, consist of a pair of round, metal plates, resembling cymbals,[1] and are used in both folk and classical music in Nepal. Unlike most percussion instruments around the world, the Jhyali is played by rubbing the plates with the right hand rising and the left hand descending at the time when they clash.[2]

Jhyali
Panche baja instruments: dholak (drums), tyamko (small kettledrums, leaning on dholak drums), narsiha (a long, S-shaped trumpet), Karnal (a wide-mouthed, straight trumpet, shehnai (a folk oboe, right of karnal), damaha (large kettledrum), and jhyali (cymbals).

These percussion instruments are made by a Nepali alloy that is called pancha dhatu, which means five metals. The alloy consists of brass, copper, silver, zinc and gold, and are usually made by blacksmiths. [3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Carol Tingey (December 1994). Auspicious music in a changing society: the Dāmai musicians of Nepal. Heritage Publishers. ISBN 978-81-7026-193-3. Retrieved 24 March 2012.
  2. ^ http://sureshparajuli.com/music.html Archived 2013-12-09 at the Wayback Machine " Jhayalis are played by friction, with the right hand rising and the left hand descending at the time when they clash."
  3. ^ "Damai Musical Instruments". Archived from the original on 2009-07-27. Retrieved 2010-05-13. "Damai Musical Instruments"