Jeff Shreve is an American public address announcer for the Cleveland Browns of the National Football League,[1] University of Akron football and men's basketball, the Mid-American Conference and the former public address announcer of the Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association and the Canton Charge of the NBA G League.[2]

Jeff Shreve
Born (1965-05-14) May 14, 1965 (age 57)
Sports commentary career
Team(s)

Shreve was born in Canton, Ohio. He left GlenOak High School in 1983 and is a graduate of the University of Mount Union (1987).

Shreve became a full-time public address announcer at the beginning of the second season of Gund Arena in the 1995-96 NBA season. He was the voice of the 1997 NBA All-Star Game and the "NBA at 50" halftime ceremony honoring the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History.[3][4] He was replaced by Ronnie Duncan after the 2004-05 NBA season as part of the team overhaul by the new owner, Dan Gilbert.

In 1999, Shreve was hired as the internal public address announcer for the Cleveland Browns and replaced Jim Mueller as the full-time stadium announcer in 2000.

Shreve was the public address announcer for the Cleveland Rockers of the WNBA for all of their seven seasons (1997-2003). He has also been the announcer for the Mid-American Conference men's and women's basketball tournaments since 2000 and the Mid-American Conference Football Championship game since 2012.

ReferencesEdit

[2][1][5][3][4]

  1. ^ a b Lubinger, Bill. "Manning the microphone at Browns Stadium a big voice, small profile post". Cleveland Plain Dealer. Retrieved 3 Dec 2008.
  2. ^ a b Duer, Benjamin. "Jeff Shreve is the man behind the stadium voice". Canton Repository. Retrieved 14 Dec 2014.
  3. ^ a b YouTube. "1997 NBA All-Star Game".
  4. ^ a b IMDb. "1997 NBA All-Star Game". IMDb.
  5. ^ Staff. "FridayNightOhio brings Bourquin, Shreve together for streaming broadcasts". FridayNightOhio.com. Retrieved 14 Jun 2018.

External linksEdit

Preceded by
Jim Mueller
Cleveland Browns Public Address Announcer
2000–present
Succeeded by
Preceded by Cleveland Cavaliers Public Address Announcer
1995–2005
Succeeded by
Ronnie Duncan