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Jay Hollister Upton (April 28, 1879 – December 30, 1938) was an American politician and attorney from the state of Oregon. He was a conservative Republican who served two years in the Oregon House of Representatives; and later, fourteen years in the Oregon State Senate. In the senate, Upton represented a large rural district in eastern Oregon. He served as President of the Oregon Senate during the 1923 legislative session. Upton ran for Governor of Oregon and for the United States Congress from Oregon's 2nd congressional district, but lost both of those elections.

Jay H. Upton
Jay H. Upton, Oregon State Senator, 1922.jpg
Oregon Senate President Jay Upton, 1922
26th President of the Oregon State Senate
In office
1923–1924
Preceded byDan J. Malarkey
Succeeded byGus C. Moser
Member of the Oregon Senate
from the 17th district
In office
1921–1934
Preceded byGeorge T. Baldwin
Succeeded byN. G. Wallace
ConstituencyCrook, Deschutes, Jefferson, Klamath, and Lake counties
Member of the Oregon House of Representatives
from the 18th district
In office
1911–1912
Preceded byWillis I. Cottel
Succeeded byOscar W. Horne
ConstituencyMultnomah County
Personal details
Born(1879-04-28)April 28, 1879
Colfax, Washington
DiedDecember 30, 1938(1938-12-30) (aged 59)
Portland, Oregon
Political partyRepublican
ProfessionAttorney

Early lifeEdit

Upton was born on 28 April 1879 in Colfax, Washington, the son of James B. and Anna Amanda (Shaw) Upton. His father was a lawyer, and his grandfather, William W. Upton, was one of the first judges to serve on the Oregon Supreme Court. His family moved to Portland, Oregon when he was an infant. Upton grew up in Portland, where he attended public schools. He graduated from high school there in 1898.[1][2][3][4]

At the outbreak of the Spanish–American War, Upton joined the United States Army. He served as a private in Company H of the 2nd Oregon Volunteer Infantry Regiment[3] and participated in the capture of Guam and the Philippine campaigns. Upton remained in the Oregon National Guard after the war. By 1911, he was serving as sergeant major of the 3rd Regiment of Oregon Infantry.[1][2][3][4]

After the war, Upton attended the University of Oregon, graduating with law degree in May 1902. After graduation, he became a law clerk for Multnomah County judge Lionel R. Webster, a position he held for three years. In 1905, Upton began a private law practice in Portland, focusing on real estate and probate law. As a young professional, he joined a number of civic organizations including the local Elks and Eagles lodges as well as the United Spanish War Veterans association. On 28 April 1909, he married Maude J. Cannon in Portland.[1][2][3][4]

State representativeEdit

Upton, a Republican, ran for a Multnomah County seat the Oregon House of Representatives in 1912.[5] At that time, Multnomah County had twelve House seats, all part of District 18. Upton was one of twelve Republicans nominees selected in the primary to represent the party in the general election.[6] In the general election, Republicans won 11 of 12 seats in the Multnomah County delegation. Upton finished twelfth in field of 51 candidates, securing the last available District 18 seat.[3][7]

Upton took his seat in the Oregon House on 13 January 1913, serving through the 1913 regular legislative session which ended in early March.[4][8] During the session, Upton served as chairman of House Exposition Committee. His committee was responsible for reviewing plans and recommending funding for Oregon's exhibits at the San Francisco and San Diego exhibitions planned for 1915.[9][10]

After the legislative session ended, Upton returned to his law practice in Portland. A year later, in 1914, he moved to Prineville in central Oregon.[3][4][11]

Central OregonEdit

Upton built a successful law practice in Prineville. He also bought an 880 acres (360 ha) ranch in the Prineville area. In his law practice, he specialized in irrigation and water rights cases. He organized the Ochoco Irrigation District and was president of the Oregon Irrigation Congress for two years. In Prineville, he continued as a member of the Elks and Eagles, serving as lodge president for both organizations. He joined the Knights of Pythias and served as the local commander of that fraternal lodge as well. He also remained active in the United Spanish War Veterans association, and was elected state commander of that veterans group.[3][4][11][12]

When World War I began in Europe, Upton recruited a volunteer regiment and was selected as the unit's captain. However, the unit was never called to active duty.[13] During that same period, Upton helped the legislature update the state's water and irrigation laws.[14] He also promoted agricultural interests throughout Oregon and advocated for dams, land reclamation, and irrigation projects.[12]

State senator (1921–24)Edit

In 1920, Upton decided to run for the state senate representing District 17. This senate district included Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson, Klamath, and Lake counties. It was the largest legislative district in Oregon, covering almost 25 percent of state's area.[3][4][15]

Upton campaigned for better roads in eastern Oregon, more investments in irrigation projects, improved rural school facilities, and anti-communist patriotism.[11][15] He won the Republican primary, easily defeating Wilson S. Willy of Klamath Falls.[16][17] The incumbent senator, George T. Baldwin, won the Democratic primary. However, Baldwin died a month after the primary and was not replaced on the general election ballot.[18] As a result, Upton was unopposed in the general election.[11][19][20] Upton took his seat in the Oregon State Senate on 10 January 1921, serving through the 1921 regular session plus a short special session in December of that year.[21][22]

Since Oregon state senators serve a four-year term, Upton did not have to run for re-election prior to the opening of the 1923 legislative session. Once the November 1914 general election was over, he began actively seeking support for the senate president position. By mid-November, Upton had commitments from 18 senators, two more than was needed to be elected President of the Senate. However, four senators switch their allegiance to other senators, leaving Upton one vote short.[23] Eventually, the senators settled into two camps, 15 supporting Upton and 14 supporting Senator B. L. Eddy of Roseburg with one Portland senator undecided. The Portland senator, Gus C. Moser, was very unpopular with eastern Oregon senators who universally supported Upton. Some of these eastern Oregon senators threatened to leave Upton if Moser supported him. However, after Upton personally assured the eastern Oregon senators he would not make any special deals with Moser, they agreed to continue to support him. Moser's support gave Upton the 16 votes he needed to become President of the Senate. In the end, Upton, was elected senate president by one vote. His supporters included three of the senate's four Democrats, all three from eastern Oregon.[24][25][26][27]

The 1923 legislative session opened on 8 January with Upton as the presiding officer in the senate. During the six-week session, the legislature passed a bill that created a new state office to promote settlement in irrigated agricultural areas of the state. It also defeated a proposed mileage tax that Upton opposed. At the end of the session, fellow senators, including Senator Eddy, lauded Upton leadership of the senate.[28][29] Newspaper editorials also commended Upton for his outstanding service as senate president, noting his bipartisan committee appointments and fairness as presiding officer during debates.[30]

At that time, the President of the Senate served as acting governor whenever Oregon's elected governor left the state. During his two-year term as senate president, Upton was the acting governor on several occasions when Governor Walter M. Pierce was traveling outside of the state.[31][32][33]

State senator (1925–34)Edit

Upton filed for re-election to his state senate in April 1924. He was opposed in the Republican primary by E. E. Varco of Vale.[33] Upton won the primary.[34] In the general election, he faced Democrat, P. E. Burke of Klamath Falls. Upton easily won that election with 5,066 votes to Burke's 3,007.[35] Upton began his second four-year term serving in the 1925 legislative session from 12 January through 26 February.[36]

In November 1925, Upton announced that he would run for Governor of Oregon.[37][38] He officially filed for the Republican nomination in March 1926.[39] In the three-way race for the Republican nomination, Upton came in second behind I. L. Patterson, receiving 38,048 votes against Patterson's 62,663.[40][41] After the primary, Upton endorsed Patterson and campaigned for him in eastern Oregon.[42] Patterson went on to win the governorship in the general election.[43]

Because he was elected to a four-year senate term, Upton did not lose his senate seat when he ran for governor. As a result, he continued his senate service during the 1927 legislative session. The session began on 10 January and lasted through 25 February.[44][45] During the session, Upton was appointed as chairman of senate Game Committee, the senate committee that handled wildlife and hunting laws. He was also a member of the judiciary, assessment and taxation, irrigation and drainage, and public lands committees.[46]

Upton ran for a third senate term in 1928.[47] He was unopposed in both the Republican primary and the general election.[48][49] Following the election, he served in the 1929 legislative session from early January through early March.[50] During the session, Upton was appointed chairman of the Railroads and Utilities Committee. He also served as a member of judiciary, roads and highways, banking, and resolutions committees.[51]

In December 1929, Governor Patterson died in office. The news media quickly identified Upton as a possible candidate for governor.[52] Upton told the newspapers he considered running for governor, but could not arranged campaign financing in time for the special election. Instead, he endorsed Governor A. W. Norblad, who as President of the Senate, had inherited the position when Patterson died.[53][54] However, Norblad was beaten in the Republican primary by George W. Joseph. Then, Joseph died of a heart attack just a few weeks after the primary. [55][56] Upton once again endorsed Norblad as the backfill candidate after the death of Joseph, but Norblad decided not to seek the nomination.[57][58] The selection was made by the state's Republican Central Committee. Upton was one of six candidates considered by the committee. However, the committee nominated its chairman, Phil Metschan, as the party's candidate for governor.[59][60] Metschan lost the 1930 general election to an independent candidate, Julius Meier.[61]

As the new governor took office, Upton returned to the state senate. He served through the 1931 session from 12 January through 6 March.[62] During the session, Upton was chairman of the Insurance Committee and the Irrigation and Drainage Committee. He also served on the judiciary, military affairs, railroads and utilities, roads and highways, and banking committees.[63]

In 1932, Upton ran for a fourth term in the senate. Once again, he was unopposed in both the Republican primary and the general election.[64][65] The 1933 legislative session began with a special session held during the first week of January followed a regular session that lasted two months. A second special session was held in late November and early December.[66][67] During these sessions, Upton served as chairman of the Judiciary Committee. He was also a member of six other committees including banking, insurance, game, irrigation and drainage, road and highways, and alcohol control.[68] Prior to the second special session, Governor Meier appointed Upton to a special commission charged with recommending regulations to control liquor distribution and sales in Oregon following repeal of Prohibition in the United States.[69]

In early 1934, newspapers began reporting that Upton was likely to run for Congress in Oregon's 2nd Congressional District, which represented eastern Oregon. In March, he filed for the Republican nomination for the 2nd District seat.[70][71] He easily beat David Graham of Vale in the Republican primary while the incumbent Congressman, Walter M. Pierce, was unopposed in the Democratic primary.[72][73] After the primary, Upton resigned his seat in the state senate so he could focus on his Congress race.[74][75] In the general election vote count, Upton took an early lead, but Pierce eventually won. The final vote was 29,221 for Pierce, 21,255 for Upton, and 1,034 for O. D. Teel, a socialist candidate.[76][77]

Later lifeEdit

After losing the Congressional race, Upton returned to central Oregon where he continued his law practice and his ranching activities. As a lawyer, Upton handled a wide variety of legal cases. He represented the public institutions like the Bend School District as well as numerous private clients.[78][79][80][81] Upton also continued his involved with local fraternal and civic organizations including the Elks, Eagles, Moose, Masons, Woodsmen of the World, Kiwanis, and the local Chamber of Commerce.[82][83] He spoke at public events and Republican gatherings around the state.[84][85][86] He was especially outspoken in his opposition to the policies of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.[87]

In 1937, he was elected to the Bend Chamber of Commerace board of directors.[88] Later that year, he was selected as chairman of the organizing committee for the United Spanish War Veterans national encampment to be held in Portland the following year. During the actual event in 1938, Upton was the chairman of the Spanish War veterans' nation convention.[89][90] Upton also remained active in the Oregon Bar Association. He was appointed to the association's governing committee for a two-year term starting in 1938. [91]

Death and legacyEdit

On 30 December 1938, Upton was killed in an automobile accident on U.S. Route 26 near Rhododendron, Oregon. The accident occurred as Upton, his wife, and another passenger were returning to central Oregon from a visit to Portland. The road was icy and Upton's vehicle skidded off road into the Zigzag River. Upton and the other passengers were pulled from the vehicle by a party of skiers. The three injured individuals were taken to the Zigzag Civilian Conservation Corps camp located about a mile from the accident scene where they were treated by the camp doctor before being transported to a Portland hospital. Upton died on the way to the hospital. Upton's wife and the other passenger both recovered from their injuries.[82][92][93][94]

On 3 January 1939, a large public funeral was held for Upton in Portland. The funeral service was overflowing with friends and admirers; many of them drove across the Cascade Mountains from central Oregon to attend the service. In addition, there were over 150 floral arrangements sent to the church for the ceremony.[95]

Upton was honored by the Oregon Bar Association and the United Spanish War Veterans association with memorial resolutions at statewide events in 1939. The United Spanish War Veterans also renamed their central Oregon camp after Upton.[96][97][98]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Jay H. Upton", History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon, Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon, 1910, pp. 237–238.
  2. ^ a b c Gaston, Joseph, "Jay Hollister Upton", Portland, Oregon Its History and Builders (Volume II), S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon, 1911, pp. 321–322.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h "Hon. Jay H. Upton", History of Oregon (Volume II), Pioneer Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon, 1922, pp. 23–25.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "Who's Who in Senate", History Oregon Voter, C. C. Chapman, Portland, Oregon, 30 December 1922, p. 57.
  5. ^ "Legislative Jobs are Being Sought by 22 Candidates", Oregon Daily Journal, Portland, Oregon, 17 March 1912, p. 3.(subscription required)
  6. ^ "Official Returns of the State are Now Nearly Complete", Oregon Daily Journal, Portland, Oregon, 27 April 1912, p. 2.(subscription required)
  7. ^ "Nolta is Popular Choice to Lead Legislative List", Oregon Daily Journal, Portland, Oregon, 20 November 1912, p. 13.(subscription required)
  8. ^ "1913 Regular Session (27th): January 13 – March 5", Oregon Legislators and Staff Guide, Oregon Secretary of State, Salem, Oregon, accessed 8 February 2016.
  9. ^ "$300,000 Fund is Urged as Limit by Businessmen", Oregon Daily Journal, Portland, Oregon, 26 January 1913, p. 31.(subscription required)
  10. ^ "Agree Oregon Must Have Fitting Exhibit", Oregon Daily Journal, Portland, Oregon, 26 January 1913, p. 1 & 2.(subscription required)
  11. ^ a b c d "Candidate and Platform in Oregon", Oregon Daily Journal, Portland, Oregon, 11 May 1920, p. 10.(subscription required)
  12. ^ a b "State Guarantee Bill is Urged by Irrigation Folks", Oregon Daily Journal, Portland, Oregon, 9 May 1919, p. 7.(subscription required)
  13. ^ "Proposed Volunteer Regiment Now has Enrollment of 910", Oregon Daily Journal, Portland, Oregon, 9 July 1916, p. 11.(subscription required)
  14. ^ "New "Irrigation Code is Described by Jay Upton", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 27 February 1917, p. 1.(subscription required)
  15. ^ a b "Upton Declares Candidacy for State Senate", Evening Herald, Klamath Falls, Oregon, 12 February 1920, p. 1.(subscription required)
  16. ^ "Race is Close for 3 Representatives", Oregon Daily Journal, Portland, Oregon, 23 May 1920, p. 4.(subscription required)
  17. ^ "Overturf High for the House", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 25 May 1920, p. 1.(subscription required)
  18. ^ "Judge Baldwin of Klamath Fall Dies", Oregon Daily Journal, Portland, Oregon, 5 June 1920, p. 3.(subscription required)
  19. ^ "213 Candidates Enrolled", Oregon Daily Journal, Portland, Oregon, 26 September 1920, p. 18.(subscription required)
  20. ^ "Legislature to Have Only Two Democrats", Oregon Daily Journal, Portland, Oregon, 5 November 1920, p. 2.(subscription required)
  21. ^ "1921 Regular Session (31st): January 10 – February 23", Oregon Legislators and Staff Guide, Oregon Secretary of State, Salem, Oregon, accessed 8 February 2016.
  22. ^ "1921 Special Session (31st): December 19–24", Oregon Legislators and Staff Guide, Oregon Secretary of State, Salem, Oregon, accessed 8 February 2016.
  23. ^ "Presto! Votes for Jay Upton Vanish", Eugene Register, Eugene, Oregon, 21 November 1922, p. 1.(subscription required)
  24. ^ "Jay Upton of Prineville Chosen President of Senate when Gus Moser lends Vote", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 24 November 1922, p. 1.(subscription required)
  25. ^ "Eastern Senators Hold Solid for Upton", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 8 December 1922, p. 1.(subscription required)
  26. ^ "Upton Clinches Presidency of Oregon Senate", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 9 December 1922, p. 1.(subscription required)
  27. ^ "Oregon Solons Hard at Work on Second Day", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 9 January 1923, p. 1.(subscription required)
  28. ^ "1923 Regular Session (32nd): January 8 – February 22", Oregon Legislators and Staff Guide, Oregon Secretary of State, Salem, Oregon, accessed 8 February 2016.
  29. ^ "Senate Honors Jay Upton for Work in Office", Albany Daily Democrat, Albany, Oregon, 18 February 1923, p. 1.(subscription required)
  30. ^ "President Jay Upton", Oregon Statesman, Salem, Oregon, 23 February 1923, p. 8.(subscription required)
  31. ^ "Upton Urges Northwest to Attend Fete", Oregon Statesman, Salem, Oregon, 24 June 1923, p. 1.(subscription required)
  32. ^ "Mr. Upton Goes to Salem", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 23 November 1923, p. 9.(subscription required)
  33. ^ a b "Senator Upton to Run Again", Evening Herald, Klamath Falls, Oregon, 8 April 1924, p. 1.(subscription required)
  34. ^ "Legisltors Who Won Primary Nominations", Daily Capital Journal, Salem, Oregon, 19 May 1924, p. 1.(subscription required)
  35. ^ "Republicans Win in Legislative Battles Throughout State", Evening Herald, Klamath Falls, Oregon, 6 November 1924, p. 1.(subscription required)
  36. ^ "1925 Regular Session (33rd): January 12 – February 26", Oregon Legislators and Staff Guide, Oregon Secretary of State, Salem, Oregon, accessed 8 February 2016.
  37. ^ "Jay H. Upton in Race for Governor Responding to Urgent Request from Here", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 14 November 1925, p. 1.(subscription required)
  38. ^ "Jay H. Upton Announces Candidacy for Governor", Daily Capital Journal, Salem, Oregon, 16 November 1925, p. 8.(subscription required)
  39. ^ "Jay Upton Files His Candidacy", Eugene Guard, Eugene, Oregon, 20 March 1926, p. 1.(subscription required)
  40. ^ "Haney's Lead of Watkins Slowly Grows", Daily Capital Journal, Salem, Oregon, 24 May 1926, p. 1.(subscription required)
  41. ^ "Haney Increases Lead in Election", Eugene Guard, Eugene, Oregon, 24 May 1926, p. 6.(subscription required)
  42. ^ "Upton Pledges Support in Note to Patterson", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 28 May 1926, p. 1.(subscription required)
  43. ^ "Governor I.L. Patterson's Administration", Oregon Secretary of State, Salem, Oregon, accessed 27 February 2016.
  44. ^ "Harmony to Rule House", Daily Capital Journal, Salem, Oregon, 5 November 1926, p. 12.(subscription required)
  45. ^ "1927 Regular Session (34th): January 10 – February 25", Oregon Legislators and Staff Guide, Oregon Secretary of State, Salem, Oregon, accessed 8 February 2016.
  46. ^ "Legislative Committees Named Today", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 11 January 1927, p. 1.(subscription required)
  47. ^ "Jay H. Upton Again in Race", Evening Herald, Klamath Falls, Oregon, 29 March 1928, p. 1.(subscription required)
  48. ^ "Republican Retain Customary Control of Legislature Next Year", Daily Capital Journal, Salem, Oregon, 28 May 1928, p. 9.(subscription required)
  49. ^ "Only 1 Place in Deschutes Contested", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 17 November 1928, p. 1.(subscription required)
  50. ^ "1929 Regular Session (35th): January 14 – March 4", Oregon Legislators and Staff Guide, Oregon Secretary of State, Salem, Oregon, accessed 8 February 2016.
  51. ^ "Legislative Story", Eugene Guard, Eugene, Oregon, 14 January 1929, p. 3.(subscription required)
  52. ^ "A Fair Field and a Wide One", Oregon Statesman, Salem, Oregon, 19 January 1930, p. 4.(subscription required)
  53. ^ "Upton to Back Norblad in Race for Nomination", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 20 February 1930, p. 1.(subscription required)
  54. ^ "Governor A.W. Norblad's Administration", Oregon Secretary of State, Salem, Oregon, accessed 27 February 2016.
  55. ^ "Winner's Margin Top 5,000", Eugene Guard, Eugene, Oregon, 17 May 1930, p. 1.(subscription required)
  56. ^ "George Josepg, Candidate for Governor, Dies Suddenly", Oregon Statesman, Salem, Oregon, 17 June 1930, p. 7.(subscription required)
  57. ^ "Upton Backs Norblad", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 16 June 1930, p. 1.(subscription required)
  58. ^ "Governor Not to Run for Office", Evening Herald, Klamath Falls, Oregon, 3 July 1930, p. 1.(subscription required)
  59. ^ "Candidates Lauded as Names Come Up", Oregon Statesman, Salem, Oregon, 26 July 1930, p. 1.(subscription required)
  60. ^ "20 Votes Cast for Chairman", Eugene Register, Eugene, Oregon, 26 July 1930, p. 1.(subscription required)
  61. ^ "Governor Julius L. Meier's Administration", Oregon Secretary of State, Salem, Oregon, accessed 27 February 2016.
  62. ^ "1931 Regular Session (36th): January 12 – March 6", Oregon Legislators and Staff Guide, Oregon Secretary of State, Salem, Oregon, accessed 8 February 2016.
  63. ^ "Marks Appoints Senate Committees", Daily Capital Journal, Salem, Oregon, 13 January 1931, p. 11.(subscription required)
  64. ^ "Upton Enter Primary for Senatorship", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 29 March 1932, p. 1.(subscription required)
  65. ^ "Upton Unopposed", Evening Herald, Klamath Falls, Oregon, 6 April 1932, p. 2.(subscription required)
  66. ^ "1933 Regular Session (37th): January 9 – March 9", Oregon Legislators and Staff Guide, Oregon Secretary of State, Salem, Oregon, accessed 8 February 2016.
  67. ^ "1933 Special Sessions (37th): 1st – January 3 – 7; 2nd – November 20 – December 9", Oregon Legislators and Staff Guide, Oregon Secretary of State, Salem, Oregon, accessed 8 February 2016.
  68. ^ "Upton and Lynch Given Places on Committees", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 4 January 1933, p. 1.(subscription required)
  69. ^ "Liquor Control Body Appointed", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 28 July 1933, p. 1.(subscription required)
  70. ^ "Jay H. Upton in Race for Seat in Congress", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 5 February 1934, p. 1.(subscription required)
  71. ^ "Jay H. Upton in Klamath; Seek Office", Evening Herald, Klamath Falls, Oregon, 19 February 1934, p. 5.(subscription required)
  72. ^ "Brown Second in State Race on Late Count", Oregon Statesman, Salem, Oregon, 19 May 1934, p. 1.(subscription required)
  73. ^ "Nominates Both Say Progress Gain Victory", Oregon Statesman, Salem, Oregon, 20 May 1934, p. 1.(subscription required)
  74. ^ "Jay H. Upton Sends Meier Resignation", Eugene Guard, Eugene, Oregon, 9 August 1934, p. 1.(subscription required)
  75. ^ "Jay Upton Resign as State Senator", Daily Capital Journal, Salem, Oregon, 9 August 1934, p. 1.(subscription required)
  76. ^ "Martin Named Oregon Chief", Oregon Statesman, Salem, Oregon, 7 November 1934, p. 8.(subscription required)
  77. ^ "Official Count of Ballots Made", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 20 November 1934, p. 4.(subscription required)
  78. ^ "Grand Jury Puts 'If' in Courthouse Report", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 8 April 1935, p. 5.(subscription required)
  79. ^ "Dr. Roy Reynolds Win Judgement in Lawsuit", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 7 May 1935, p. 5.(subscription required)
  80. ^ "Back Seat Driver Found on Jury Panel", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 20 November 1935, p. 5.(subscription required)
  81. ^ "Three Damage Suits on Docket of Court", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 17 November 1936, p. 1.(subscription required)
  82. ^ a b "Jay Upton Ex-Senate Chief is Crash Victum", Oregon Statesman, Salem, Oregon, 31 December 1938, p. 1 & 2.(subscription required)
  83. ^ "Bend Kiwanis Club Installs Officers", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 4 January 1937, p. 5.(subscription required)
  84. ^ "Jay Upton Addresses Churchman's Group", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 4 January 1934, p. 7.
  85. ^ "Flag Ceremont Set for Friday", Klamath News, Klamath Falls, Oregon, 12 June 1935, p. 3.(subscription required)
  86. ^ "Rival Party Session Held in Bend", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 22 September 1936, p. 1.(subscription required)
  87. ^ "Attorneys Argue Campaign Issues", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 26 October 1936, p. 2.(subscription required)
  88. ^ "Chamber of Commerce Directors Named", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 25 February 1937, p. 5.(subscription required)
  89. ^ "Veterans Plan 1938 Encampment, Jay H. Upton Chairman of Committee", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 12 March 1937, p. 1.(subscription required)
  90. ^ "Jay H. Upton of Bend in Charge of Spanish War Veterans Meeting", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 3 September 1938, p. 1.(subscription required)
  91. ^ "Bar Association Names Committee for 1938–39", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 5 November 1937, p. 3.(subscription required)
  92. ^ "Jay H. Upton Fatally Hurt in Cart Wreck", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 30 December 1938, p. 1.(subscription required)
  93. ^ "Jay H. Upton Dies in Crash on Highway", Daily Capital Journal, Salem, Oregon, 30 December 1938, p. 9.(subscription required)
  94. ^ "Former State Senator Dies in Car Wreck", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 31 December 1938, p. 4.(subscription required)
  95. ^ "Last Rites Held for Jay H. Upton", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 3 January 1939, p. 1.(subscription required)
  96. ^ "Tribute is Paid to Jay H. Upton", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 18 January 1939, p. 5.(subscription required)
  97. ^ "Jay H. Upton is Honored by Bar", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 26 January 1939, p. 3.(subscription required)
  98. ^ "Spanish War Veterans Honor Jay H. Upton", Bend Bulletin, Bend, Oregon, 22 September 1939, p. 5.(subscription required)

External linksEdit